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A conversation via text with my sister....


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...this morning was interesting. It started off with her sending me a pic of a gorgeous ‘65 Chevy Impala. She’s told me she’d drive that in a heartbeat. LOL! But what she said next was spot on.... the classic cars of yesteryears were the best cars. No computer modules, no electronic BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH and made in the USA. Cars of today have parts made in Japan, China, or Lord knows where. Nobody builds complete cars, including parts made, in the USA anymore.

I told her those were the glory days of classic cars. When I told her my wish is I want to get another car which happens to be my first one - a 1964 Dodge Dart, slant six, push button automatic transmission in dark blue. (Let’s see if today’s kids can figure out how drive that! LOL!!) If I do get lucky with another ‘64 Dart, I’d get the GT and put in a high performance turbo slant six under the hood. Hey...gotta make her a sleeper Mopar muscle car :)

She told me her dream was to get a Dart too (sedan or wagon) or a ‘61 or ‘62 Ford Falcon wagon that my grandparents owned when we were kids growing up. A Plymouth Valiant my dad once owned was mentioned but she can’t remember what year his was. Others mentioned are Ford Fairlane, Plymouth Duster, and Chevy Impala. In fact, she’ll take any classic car that looks good.

My baby sister has good taste in cars. LOLOL!

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Sounds like a plan, Tom.  Good luck finding a '64 Dart in CNY.  My friends in Rochester did find a 4-door '67 Impala in Michigan.  Shipping to Rochester was pretty reasonable, too.  Like $350.

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Awesome! Glad to see love of classics isn't completely dead. Yeah, technology is producing some neat stuff, but nothing made today can hold a candle to the classic styles of the 20's to the 70's.

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A lot of people say they want a more simple car, but then when you stick them in a basic, older car, they complain about the lack of features/comfort/performance/etc.

Case in point, I just leased a new 2021 F350 XLT to a long time client. He's always had loaded pickups. Said he wanted something more simple this time, too much to go wrong with his other trucks. He's 2 months into his lease. We just ordered him a loaded 2022 F350 Platinum because this XLT "isn't as nice." He wants his vented and massaging seats, and the adaptive steering, and the big sunroof, and blind spot monitoring.  Ahh well, the customer is always right. 

 

For me, as much as I enjoy a lot of the electronics and tech in modern cars, I do appreciate the simplicity of older ones.

Within reason.

If the tech makes the car more reliable and dependable, then I'm all for it. Modern ignition and fuel systems, power steering, ABS, LED lighting. 

If the tech makes me more comfortable, then I'm all for it. AC, bluetooth, satellite radio, remote start, heated seats. 

 

I don't need all the other stuff, and I could not care less where my vehicles are built.  Build quality and overall value are far more important to me.

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I have to admit to being spoiled by the newer cars in our garage, but there are several older cars I have had in the past that I would love to own again. The mention of the technology of todays cars reminds me that we have been waiting for a couple of months now for the computer chip that will make the radio and the backup camera in our '18 Charger play nice with each other. There are times when I go to back up and the camera doesn't work. The radio tells me that one of my preselected tunes is playing on another channel when it's not. OO for the old AM radio with the 8 track player option. Now you know how far back I would be willing to go. 

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I'm happy and used to modern cars and SUVs, love my 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee, it's pretty loaded w/ goodies (though the new generation w/ the optional MacIntosh sound system sounds like what I want next for a daily driver).      There are several cars I've had in the past and other older cars I wouldn't mind having, though....my sweet spot for old cars is mid 80s to early 00s, wouldn't want anything w/ carburetors or points or other fiddly old tech.  

Wouldn't mind having another '80s Fox Mustang 5.0, an early Acura Legend 2dr, another BMW E36 M3, an BMW E39 M5, or another 80s Mercedes S-class or E-class... 

Edited by Rob Hall
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7 hours ago, Zippi said:

Here ya go Tom.  It's sold but one fine looking car.  There are plenty out there.

1964 Dodge Dart | Classic Cars for Sale - Streetside Classics

1964-dodge-dart-gt.jpg

That... is gorgeous. Who doesn’t love the lines on this old girl? 

Now why won’t Revell, MPC, AMT, or somebody produce a 1964 Dodge Dart GT kit? Heck, why not a 1964 Polara 500? 

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On 8/19/2021 at 6:54 PM, BlackSheep214 said:

...this morning was interesting. It started off with her sending me a pic of a gorgeous ‘65 Chevy Impala. She’s told me she’d drive that in a heartbeat. LOL! But what she said next was spot on.... the classic cars of yesteryears were the best cars. No computer modules, no electronic BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH and made in the USA. Cars of today have parts made in Japan, China, or Lord knows where. Nobody builds complete cars, including parts made, in the USA anymore.

I told her those were the glory days of classic cars. When I told her my wish is I want to get another car which happens to be my first one - a 1964 Dodge Dart, slant six, push button automatic transmission in dark blue. (Let’s see if today’s kids can figure out how drive that! LOL!!) If I do get lucky with another ‘64 Dart, I’d get the GT and put in a high performance turbo slant six under the hood. Hey...gotta make her a sleeper Mopar muscle car :)

She told me her dream was to get a Dart too (sedan or wagon) or a ‘61 or ‘62 Ford Falcon wagon that my grandparents owned when we were kids growing up. A Plymouth Valiant my dad once owned was mentioned but she can’t remember what year his was. Others mentioned are Ford Fairlane, Plymouth Duster, and Chevy Impala. In fact, she’ll take any classic car that looks good.

My baby sister has good taste in cars. LOLOL!

My older sister still has her first car that dad gave her when she turned 16. A 1965 Galaxie 500 convertible.  It is in need of an entire restoration at this time,  but her husband can handle it. She wants it restored to original condition yet she was lamenting the fact that she really couldn't use it as a reliable and safe daily driver.  I informed her that she could do so and still keep it looking all original and anything done could always be undone easy enough. I showed her that she could add electronic ignition with either a module or replacement distributer, change out the carburetor for a fuel injection setup, and add a disc brake conversion kit up front, and dual master cylinder if needed.(it already has power steering and brakes) If she wanted to keep the rpm down at 80 (freeway speed in her state) she could always switch out the C4 for a mechanical OD unit from the early 80's.  As far as amenities,  easy enough to add an aftermarket stereo with Bluetooth and updated speakers that fit in the factory locations. Add a vintage air system if you want to chill in the summer. Heated seats and cruise control could be added as well. All of these are pretty basic upgrades that can make your driving experience that much more enjoyable.  If it's enjoyable,  you will drive it more. 

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I am fortunate that I do not have to dream of a classic car. I have always had one since 1982.

My cruiser of choice is a '72 Pontiac Grand Prix. They were marketed as Luxury with Performance.

Unlike most muscle cars of the era, it has many comfort features optioned in. Power disc brakes, power steering, power windows, power door locks (I added remotes), power driver's seat, power trunk release, rear window defroster, A/C, posi-traction, upgraded suspension, slap stick shifter and oh yeah, 455 cubes of gas guzzling power.

I have also added a killer stereo with 12 speakers, 4 amps and a digital signal processor I can manipulate with my iPad. I even put in a second battery so I can jam at full tilt for two hours without running the engine.

EVERY time I drive it I get thumbs up or "nice car!" from young and old.

IMG_0405.JPG

Proposed configuration.JPG

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10 minutes ago, BlackSheep214 said:

I'd love to see the look of lost and bewilderment of young folks today figure out how to drive a push button automatic transmission automobile. ROFLMAO!

Likely not that much different than the push button automatics of today (as seen on various GMC SUVs, various Lincolns, etc). 

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I had a dealer loaner last week when they were putting the trailer hitch on my wife's new Cherokee Trail Hawk. The 2021 Dodge short bed was sort of a basic work truck but had a dial on the dash for the gear selector.  

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6 hours ago, Rob Hall said:
7 hours ago, BlackSheep214 said:

I'd love to see the look of lost and bewilderment of young folks today figure out how to drive a push button automatic transmission automobile. ROFLMAO!

Likely not that much different than the push button automatics of today (as seen on various GMC SUVs, various Lincolns, etc). 

I really don't think that pushing a button with a "D" or an "R" on it is so difficult or unusual that it would take more than 10 seconds for a "young folk" to figure out. They would probably figure it out faster than a Gen Xer.

Saw a hilarious security video this week of the attempted theft of a 2020 Civic. Electric parking brake > crackhead thief. 

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21 minutes ago, Rodent said:

I really don't think that pushing a button with a "D" or an "R" on it is so difficult or unusual that it would take more than 10 seconds for a "young folk" to figure out. They would probably figure it out faster than a Gen Xer.

It’s quite easy.  I’m a Gen-Xer, have driven modern vehicles with buttons or rotary dials for gear selection, quite easy.  I like the rotary dials, they free up space on the console.

 My Jeep has a rather odd shifter—moves forward or back for the gear, but it pops back to a fixed place. I think they only used that shifter for 2 years.  

Edited by Rob Hall
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20 hours ago, Rob Hall said:

 My Jeep has a rather odd shifter—moves forward or back for the gear, but it pops back to a fixed place. I think they only used that shifter for 2 years.  

Yes, the "wobble" shifter that killed Anton Yelchin. I haven't driven a Jeep with one, but I have driven BMWs and Audis with a similar unit. The thing I don't like about the "alternate shifters" is that i have to look at them to make sure that I have selected the desired gear. Every column or floor A/T I have driven is the same, one audible detent down for reverse, two more for drive. 

Guido: My daily is a 6mt and our extra vehicle is a 5mt.

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3 minutes ago, Rodent said:

Yes, the "wobble" shifter that killed Anton Yelchin. I haven't driven a Jeep with one, but I have driven BMWs and Audis with a similar unit. The thing I don't like about the "alternate shifters" is that i have to look at them to make sure that I have selected the desired gear. Every column or floor A/T I have driven is the same, one audible detent down for reverse, two more for drive. 

Guido: My daily is a 6mt and our extra vehicle is a 5mt.

Even after 4 years driving it, I still have to look at it.  When I first bought it, I found myself going into neutral instead of reverse often.  I need to get back into driving manuals, my first 14 or so years of driving I only had manual cars and a manual SUV...at one point in my late 20s ('98-00) I owned 3 manuals.   

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On 8/21/2021 at 1:07 PM, Sam I Am said:

Fluid Drive transmission

A friend of mine in the Air Force back in North Carolina had a '51 Windsor that had a chassis and engine from a '52 New Yorker with the Fluid Drive transmission. The clutch was only needed for changing from forward to reverse or low range to high range. Car was slow as molasses even with the Hemi. Can't imagine what it was like with the original Spitfire flathead six. I think he took it back to Akron, Ohio when he got out of the Air Force

Edited by THarrison351
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I got a '51 Chrysler from a family friend many eons ago. He had bought it new and I was needing a transportation car while going to city College and I had a hard time making lunch money. He sold it to me for a $1.00. Anyway it had the "powerful flathead 6" with the Fluid Drive. You could use the clutch and reave the engine in low and pop the clutch. Nothing could touch you across the cross walk stripes. After that you had better have packed a lunch since you were going for a slow ride. 

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