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Rust-Oleum won't give me straight answers to my questions about Testors enamel weights.


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16 minutes ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

You're serious, huh?

I’m thinking the OP is just trolling at this point. Either for attention or laughing at our expense for taking any of this seriously. Either way, from now on it’s probably best to ignore him and his whole painting dilemma until he actually paints something...

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57 minutes ago, Smoke Wagon said:

Why go through all the trouble to try and analyze your paint down to the molecular level

That way, he won't have to post anything he'll never build or finish.

2 hours ago, Plumcrazy Preston said:

I will have to set up my own outdoor lab one day, weather permitting in SW Oklahoma, with my electronic digital postal scale, my notepad, my pencil, my pill cups, my pipettes and my calculator to get these weights per unit volume down pat and recorded.

Enough, already! You want to analyze, get THIS. You'll be able to scientifically analyze until your head explodes from data overload.

1347259031_massspectrometer.jpg.1338ba7c01a93ca45c2282948b07065c.jpg

You could set it up in your living room. It can also be used as a home entertainment center.

2 hours ago, Plumcrazy Preston said:

Does anybody here understand working up loads?

You do. That describes the drek you regularly subject us to in your mind-numbngly stupid posts.

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Easy solution. Start with a 50-50 mix. Try spraying that and see if its to ruuny or too thick. Swirl the paint and observe how it runs down side of jar. Too thin add in more paint and if two thick add more thinner. Do the same thing again and try spraying the mixture. Again observe how the paint swirls. Once you get a consistacy you like th we n recreate that paint consistency.

You simply have ti get your hands dirty at this point to see what worjs for you.

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1 hour ago, Smoke Wagon said:

...the Walter White of painting....

HAHAHAHAHAHA! Good one! :lol:

1 hour ago, Smoke Wagon said:

Why go through all the trouble to try and analyze your paint down to the molecular level, when chances are you’re going to get something like a speck of dust, hair, God forbid a bug, in the paint anyway?

Mr. Wagon brings up an excellent point, and allows me to highlight one big difference between model painting and shooting: With shooting, once the shot's broken, it's gone, and there's nothing you can do to change or improve the result you're gonna get. But with a paint job, if you get a run or a dust booger or some orange peel, you can fix it when it's dry with color-sanding, polishing, and sometimes more paint. IMHO, learning to polish paint is a more valuable skill than learning how to lay it down perfectly. B)

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2 hours ago, Plumcrazy Preston said:

...I will have to set up my own outdoor lab one day with my electronic digital postal scale, my notepad, my pencil, my pill cups, my pipettes and my calculator to get these weights per unit volume down pat and recorded. 

That's pretty funny right there.

The "electronic digital postal scales" I've seen lack the precision you'll require to accurately measure and compare the specific weights of "pill cup" amounts of anything.

You're going need something accurate in the sub-one-gram range.

I use an old-school beam scale that will measure down to .1 gram for mixing aviation-grade composite resins...and you have to use them out of a draft to get any consistent results.

That kind of accuracy is necessary for mixing structural materials that hold things together that go several-hundred miles per hour and are subjected to multi-G loads.

That kind of accuracy is also required to achieve color matches in the collision industry, where one color may have 10 or more pigments and toners (with which I have considerable experience).

That kind of accuracy is not, however, necessary to achieve proper spraying consistency of any material I've worked with over the last 5 decades building high end vehicles...and somewhat above average models.  B)

 

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I found the idea of using paint, thinner, and clear gloss to help keep the paint from separating an interesting one. I have never heard of that. I wonder if it works?

That said, I am just getting back into airbrushing after a hiatus. I got my feet wet with Scale Finishes Harbor Blue (pre-thinned) on this Revell 57 Chevy snapper. Since one of the interior choices was matching blue with black, I shot the interior pieces first to get a feel for the paint. I have a Paasche H, with a 5 needle. I started at 25 PSI on a 60-ish degree overcast day in the garage and rain was just beginning to fall (bad). The interior came out pretty well, and my left hand was quite blue (stupid paint cup). On a better day, I shot the body at 30 PSI with the needle closed down a bit from how I did the interior. Paint went down nicely. Now I just need to clear it. Hopefully I won't mess it up.
 
I guess that is practice?
 
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3 hours ago, CabDriver said:

I mean, they're right though.  There's no perfect formula for getting the perfect paint job every time with every kind of paint. 

You need to practice, get a feel for the paint and what works for YOU with YOUR technique, your equipment and in YOUR environment.

They're not refusing to give you straight answers - you're asking questions that they won't be able to answer...

Exactly.

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I'll admit, I'm surprised that Rustoleum responded with as much info as they did.

 

As literally EVERYONE here has told you over your previous threads, you need to start mixing and practicing. As you have said, that is of course a waste of paint and money, because some of those tests won't get you the results you want.

Have you reached out to the world's leading authority on everything painting? Andy X? What does he say about your predicament? I'm assuming that you have reached out to him.

Or maybe you have exhausted that avenue, now you want a book on the subject. Collectively, the members of this board have tried to assist, multiple times, and they know more about airbrushing and getting great paint results than any single author out there. Yet, you still do not take anyone's advice.

 

At this point, I can't tell if you are trolling the board or are actually serious about this.

 

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45 minutes ago, bobthehobbyguy said:

Easy solution. Start with a 50-50 mix. Try spraying that and see if its to ruuny or too thick. Swirl the paint and observe how it runs down side of jar. Too thin add in more paint and if two thick add more thinner. Do the same thing again and try spraying the mixture. Again observe how the paint swirls. Once you get a consistacy you like th we n recreate that paint consistency.

You simply have ti get your hands dirty at this point to see what worjs for you.

You’re barking up the wrong tree Bob, (If that’s your real name) 😊

Many of us have offered sound advice ad nausea, to no avail.

He’s obviously much more interested in wasting his own time, and everyone else’s, with these pointless posts than getting on with it.

Beginning to look more and more like a troll with each successive post.

 

 

 

Steve

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1 hour ago, Fantom said:

Why can’t you airbrush inside an apartment…I did it for years next to an open window with a window fan….maybe not  the best thing but it worked. 

I have asthma and I'm chemical-sensitive. I don't want any paint odor inside my home or visible paint damage to anything valuable. 

 

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I've just conducted my paint lab work outside my apartment with my postal scale and my calculator and here is what I have come up with; I have an AS college degree so I know some algebra. The specific gravity of paint is quite greater than that of the thinner. The paint is heavier or denser so unequal weights per equal volumes of each product has to be taken in to consideration. The different paints by pigment types measured so closely on the scale I will just use a blanket average weight in grams for them all. I take it the convention in panting is to mix by fluid volumes and not by weights. Doing it by weight will make things much less messier for me. I use grams instead of avoirdupois ounces because grams are much smaller (lighter) units and much more precision on the scale can be attained. My scale is calibrated in both English and metric weights. My scale is only precise to the nearest tenth for ounces but there are 28.3495 grams per ounce. A gram is nearly 1 of 28 divisions of an ounce. In metric mode, my scale is only precise to the nearest whole gram.  Grams are not fractionalized on the scale readout. There's not quite 3 grams per 1/10th of an ounce. 

 

Empty Paasche 1 oz. jar with lid and seal = 50 grams

Empty Testors Enamel Jar, 0.25 fluid ounces, with lid = 30 grams

Testors Enamels (from 0.25 fl. oz jars) = 36 grams/fluid ounce [average weight of flat, gloss, semi-gloss, metallic and non-metallic pigments]

Testors Universal Enamel Thinner = 22 grams/fluid ounce

Small Hex Nut used as a paint mixing agitator in jar = 0 grams, not measurable on digital electronic postal scale

Mixing Ratio for Testors Enamels and Enamel Thinner per label on can = 3 parts paint/2 parts thinner for gloss; 3 parts paint/1 part thinner for flat; 2 parts paint/1 part thinner for semi-gloss

 


Weight Formulae for Mixing Testors Enamels and Universal Enamel Thinner


Let t = thinner weight in grams and p = paint weight in grams


For 3 parts paint/2 parts thinner for gloss:

t = 0.42p


For 3 parts paint/1 part thinner for flat:

t = 0.21p


For 2 parts paint/1 part thinner for semi-gloss:

t = 0.31p

 

 

Edited by Plumcrazy Preston
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6 minutes ago, Plumcrazy Preston said:

I've just conducted my paint lab work outside my apartment with my postal scale and my calculator and here is what I have come up with; I have an AS college degree so I know some algebra. The specific gravity of paint is quite greater than that of the thinner. The paint is heavier or denser and has to be taken in to consideration. I take it the convention in panting is to mix by fluid volumes and not by weights. Doing it by weight will make things much less messier for me. 

 

Empty Paasche 1 oz. jar with lid and seal = 50.0 grams

Empty Testors Enamel Jar, 0.25 fluid ounces, with lid = 29.5 grams

Testors Enamels (from 0.25 fl.oz jars) = 36.0 grams/fluid ounce [average weight of flat, gloss, semi-gloss, metallic and non-metallic pigments]

Testors Universal Enamel Thinner = 22.0 grams/fluid ounce

Small Hex Nut used as a paint mixing agitator in jar = 0.0 grams, not measurable on digital electronic postal scale

Mixing Ratio for Testors Enamels and Enamel Thinner per label on can = 3 parts paint/2 parts thinner for gloss; 3 parts paint/1 part thinner for flat; 2 parts paint/1 part thinner for semi-gloss


Weight Formulae for Mixing Testors Enamels and Universal Enamel Thinner


Let t = thinner weight in grams and p = paint weight in grams


For 3 parts paint/2 parts thinner for gloss:

t = 0.42p


For 3 parts paint/1 part thinner for flat:

t = 0.21p


For 2 parts paint/1 part thinner for semi-gloss:

t = 0.31p

 

 

This just keeps getting better all of the time! 😄

 

Steve

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