Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

Revell Porsche 911 G Coupe problems


Recommended Posts

picked up Revell new 911, and what seems to be a common occurrence with new Revell Germany Kits, Sink Marks, on this kit they show up on the C-Pillar, they are hard to repair as well. 

 

IMG_0449.jpg

IMG_0450.jpg

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Building on a budget and Tamiya magazine noted the same problems. The tip would be to use tape to protect the areas where you need detail kept and use a decent filler. 
 

Ben 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frustrating but fixable. I'll probably hold out for the US boxing though. Revell often fixes, or at least minimizes, these issues by the time they get around to releasing the US versions. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back 10 years ago or so I was designing plastic components for a company making aftermarket parts for 1:1 cars.  My job, loosely put, was to take existing plastic components, reverse engineer them, see what improvements could be made (and identify if there was a viable market for an upgrade part if we weren't making a straight bolt-on replacement) and then design the part.

I must've seen 50 different times a case where a part would be run out of nice high-quality material (new virgin plastic pellets, no color added or recycled material) and the piece would be fine - and then they'd run the production pieces on a lower quality material or start mixing color into it and it would cause issues.  And I'm pretty sure that's what happened with those E-type bodies too, with the warps and sink marks...they get the part figured out in CAD, cut tooling, make test pieces, adjust...and then somewhere down the line someone comes up with the idea of using colored material or something cheaper and you start seeing weird issues like this.  Sink marks where there weren't any before, parts warping when they come out of the machine, brittle or fragile material etc. etc.

If I was Revell first thing I'd try on these (and the E-types) is ditch the colored plastic and try regular old white.

I'm sure they don't care what I think tho, and I don't claim to be an expert in their processes...just recounting some of my experiences with this stuff... 🤪

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sink marks are nothing new w/ RoG, though...their Panamera a few years ago had a variety of sink marks.  Revell really needs to work on their quality control.  It's a bit absurd to see these kinds of issues w/ new tools....

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sink marks almost always appear where the plastic abruptly changes thickness, such as where a brace, rib, or bracket appears on the back or underside. That appears to be the case with this 911 body.

It's entirely possible this is mostly unavoidable in this case. Perhaps it was a compromise regarding the locating tabs inside the body? Not an excuse, but, as James said, not everything comes out golden.

I don't think the sink marks shown are in the worst possible location, honestly. While that does not excuse their presence, the drip rail provides a nice guide for a sanding stick, etc. Thanks goodness we have the ways and means to correct the things which don't meet our standards: http://italianhorses.net/Tutorials/Primer/primer.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just had a look at the body shell on the one I have in the stash - same problem.  I think Jim is right about the use of coloured plastic.  I built a test shot of the new Revell E-type coupe and there were no issues at all but when the kit came out moulded in glossy red plastic it was a different story.  I wonder if the Targa version of this kit has the same issue, since the body is moulded in red.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think they have fixed the E-Type coupe at least I don't remember seeing any sink marks on the two bodies I have recently got. Think I will wait a year or so before considering buying the 911.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/3/2022 at 12:55 PM, CabDriver said:

Back 10 years ago or so I was designing plastic components for a company making aftermarket parts for 1:1 cars.  My job, loosely put, was to take existing plastic components, reverse engineer them, see what improvements could be made (and identify if there was a viable market for an upgrade part if we weren't making a straight bolt-on replacement) and then design the part.

Was it Dorman Products? I heard that's what they do when they recreate parts to replace the junky OEM ones that keep breaking in the same places.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like with the 2x paint, the manufacturer won't know there is a problem with their product if the product is not returned to the store, or a warranty claim is created by requesting a new body from Revell.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...