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Just completed stock '51 Chevy Sedan delivery


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I'm just completing this detailed stock '51 Chevy Sedan Delivery based on two plastic model kits of relatively questionable proportion...the Revell '54 sedan delivery, and AMT's '51 Chevy two door fastback sedan. I've cut open and tight-hinged all the doors, added poseable steering and, using lots of reference, detailed the basic '51 SD interior, including headliner with dome light, and opening spare wheel access at the rear floor. Brass wire was then used as reinforcement to keep the body structurally sound once all the various parts were cut open. The '51 Chevy windshield has been corrected and most of the car's trim is done using stainless wire. Window glazing is clear polycarbonate which can be curved without showing whitish stress marks. The standard equipment 216" Chevy '6' is now detailed with plug wires, vacuum and fuel lines, heater hoses, etc, and the hood now has simulated hood hinges that are visible when the hood is open and disappear into the fenders/firewall when the hood is closed. The underside now has the correct spare wheel floor-pan and the correct SD/wagon fuel tank (Renshape tank with aluminum strip hold-downs cut from a pop can). The sedan deliveries standard folding commercial bucket seats are also fabricated in Renshape. In order to avoid the 'metalflake' look of automotive metallic paint on a 1/25 model, I chose automotive DupliColor touchup to simulate the available 'Moonlight Cream' non-metallic color.

51 chevy sd b.jpg

51 chevy sd e.jpg

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Cliff, you've done a superb job taking the best parts of these two kits and blending them together. Your very extensive body work has really captured all the subtle characteristics of the '51 Chevy sedan delivery. I think a big part of the fun in a project like this is all the research that goes into getting the factory details right. You work just as easily in diecast metal as you do in plastic, so I guess it's a matter of whatever material the desired subject is in. Reinforcing the body with wire is a smart plan. You won't have to worry about the model falling apart down the road and the doors will continue to open and close as they should. Seeing your in-progress photos made me realize there's a surprising amount of brightwork on these cars. Reproducing it was a lot of work but certainly worth it in my opinion. 

I have a big appreciation for '49 to '52 Chevrolets. I feel as though they exist somewhat in the shadow of the ever popular tri-five Chevys. Their good looking styling was sort of transitional but they don't have the performance image.

I love the last photo with all your SDs together, and I'm looking forward to seeing this latest addition in person. It shouldn't be too long from now!

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This looks like the work of a professional model maker! Impressive and inspiring! The small proportional changes that you made in merging and adjusting these two inaccurate kit bodies are very subtle but amazingly effective! You have an amazing eye and the workmanship skills to go with it. Bravo!

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