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removeing acylic paint


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Try soaking those parts in some 99% Isopropyl alcohol. It can work with aqueous acrylic paints, as well as some acrylic lacquers (Tamiya), though it may not remove 100% of the paint. 

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22 hours ago, Madd Trucker said:

I   forgot to prime some parts and the paint  peeling off  what is  the  fastest  way  to  remove it

just like Greg said 99% Isopropyl alcohol. easy off or what they call super clean only works on enamels..

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53 minutes ago, yh70 said:

wont remove acrylic paint..only enamels..

Dave, what is an "acrylic paint"?  Can you explain?   The hobby paint terminology is so convoluted due to ambiguous and/or vague usage of the terms.

Paint is a general term for liquid coatings which dry or harden on the painted surfaces.  Those paints then can be subdivided into multiple categories, based on the solvents and the binder chemistries.  Acrylic lacquers and acrylic enamels are both "paint". So are nitrocellulose-based paints, epoxy paints, urethane paints, etc.

Unfortunately the average modeler has barely or no clue of what the correct usage of the terminology is.  Vague hobby paint labeling makes things ever more confusing.  I'm not a chemist, but I to be a better modeler I have familiarized myself with the basics of paint, their types and the terminology used.  We all really need to get better at understanding paint terminology.

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Methylated Spirits is another alternative for removing water based and alcohol based acrylic paints.

 

27 minutes ago, peteski said:

The hobby paint terminology is so convoluted due to ambiguous and/or vague usage of the terms.

Paint is a general term for liquid coatings which dry or harden on the painted surfaces.  Those paints then can be subdivided into multiple categories, based on the solvents and the binder chemistries.  Acrylic lacquers and acrylic enamels are both "paint". So are nitrocellulose-based paints, epoxy paints, urethane paints, etc.

Unfortunately the average modeler has barely or no clue of what the correct usage of the terminology is.  Vague hobby paint labeling makes things ever more confusing.  I'm not a chemist, but I to be a better modeler I have familiarized myself with the basics of paint, their types and the terminology used.  We all really need to get better at understanding paint terminology.

Really!!

I find very simple to identify what formulation a paint is by the labelling. No need for the semantics. OP has found the solution

 

 

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8 hours ago, peteski said:

Dave, what is an "acrylic paint"?  Can you explain?   The hobby paint terminology is so convoluted due to ambiguous and/or vague usage of the terms.

Paint is a general term for liquid coatings which dry or harden on the painted surfaces.  Those paints then can be subdivided into multiple categories, based on the solvents and the binder chemistries.  Acrylic lacquers and acrylic enamels are both "paint". So are nitrocellulose-based paints, epoxy paints, urethane paints, etc.

Unfortunately the average modeler has barely or no clue of what the correct usage of the terminology is.  Vague hobby paint labeling makes things ever more confusing.  I'm not a chemist, but I to be a better modeler I have familiarized myself with the basics of paint, their types and the terminology used.  We all really need to get better at understanding paint terminology.

I agree with you on the confusion Pete. I’ve been in the model making business for over 40 years and the term acrylic was used loosely. Basically acrylic is a clear polymer. Plexiglas is acrylic. As far as I can tell, the hobbyist refer acrylic to water and alcohol soluble paints.

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On 2/17/2022 at 10:25 PM, peteski said:

Dave, what is an "acrylic paint"?  Can you explain?   The hobby paint terminology is so convoluted due to ambiguous and/or vague usage of the terms.

Paint is a general term for liquid coatings which dry or harden on the painted surfaces.  Those paints then can be subdivided into multiple categories, based on the solvents and the binder chemistries.  Acrylic lacquers and acrylic enamels are both "paint". So are nitrocellulose-based paints, epoxy paints, urethane paints, etc.

Unfortunately the average modeler has barely or no clue of what the correct usage of the terminology is.  Vague hobby paint labeling makes things ever more confusing.  I'm not a chemist, but I to be a better modeler I have familiarized myself with the basics of paint, their types and the terminology used.  We all really need to get better at understanding paint terminology.

Professor i dont need your opinion, you think i am a kid ??.. im 67 years old..i probably forgot more than you know..

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27 minutes ago, yh70 said:

you think i am a kid ??.. im 67 years old..i probably forgot more than you know..

That question can also be asked of you since it seems you are assuming that peteski is. Age doesn't bestow or infer possessing knowledge superior to others. It only means that you've been around a bit longer. No more, no less.

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23 minutes ago, SfanGoch said:

That question can also be asked of you since it seems you are assuming that peteski is. Age doesn't bestow or infer possessing knowledge superior to others. It only means that you've been around a bit longer. No more, no less.

Perhaps a comment that is actually referring to the topic would be more useful than unneeded commentary. 

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1 hour ago, Sandboarder said:

I think the confusion comes from water base acrylics and acrylic lacquer (or solvent based acrylic). All are marketed as acrylic yet shared very different properties and thinner requirements.

At least someone here understands this.  It is rare in the modeling community.  It is actually not that all those coatings are marketed as "acrylic". It is that modelers use the word "acrylic" when referring to the water-based hobby paints (even though as you correctly stated, there are many other none-water-based acrylic coatings).

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What I do @peteski is use the same brand thinners. Tamiya Acrylic gets Tamiya acrylic thinner, Mr Colour acrylic lacquer get Mr Hobby Lacquer thinner and so on.
 

Where most guys will cringe and why I didn’t post earlier is because I use the matching thinner to strip the paint too 😬 I don’t soak the body but wipe them with a damp cloth moisten with the correct thinner. 

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6 hours ago, Sandboarder said:

What I do @peteski is use the same brand thinners. Tamiya Acrylic gets Tamiya acrylic thinner, Mr Colour acrylic lacquer get Mr Hobby Lacquer thinner and so on.
 

Where most guys will cringe and why I didn’t post earlier is because I use the matching thinner to strip the paint too 😬 I don’t soak the body but wipe them with a damp cloth moisten with the correct thinner. 

Sounds like a reasonable approach.  Eliminates the chance of damaging the plastic with the stripping process. 

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