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Has anyone here ever tried to replicate hail damage on a model car.  Just trying to think of this for a build I am working on.  It's not uncommon around these parts for it to rain baseballs in the summertime.   I thought about warming it up with a heat gun and pouring bb's over it,  but I think by the time you get it warm enough it would be warped to the point of being unworkable.  I have tried a search here and on the net and come up empty handed.   Just looking for ideas.

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Funny thing is that I would never think of trying to make a model of hail damaged vehicles.  That's IMO ugly. But I guess if you see enough of those cars, they might grow on you.

Edited by peteski
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For what, a Corvette? 😉  Depends on the vehicle, an old International truck wouldn't even get dents, an aluminum body must look different than a steel body?  I've used the Dremel to make dents, sanded and steel wool to smooth the divot.  Do the other damage like broken glass, mirrors hanging, would be fun.

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Like Bill said…twirl a small drill bit to create divots. Alternately, you could use any type of metal rod with a rounded end. Heat it up and melt in a little divot. Then sand the displaced styrene back level to the body. Try a few trials on a scrap body or even on plastic spoons.

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A diamond coated ball burr would be the go.  Quick and easy to achieve the effect.

There is a cheap generic brand set out there.

xPk6B8k.jpg

Comes with 5 ball end burr's.

fKXZ6LM.jpg

Edited by Cool Hand
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3 hours ago, Rick L said:

Heat the bb’s instead of the plastic. Then pour the bb’s over the cold plastic.

i think they would stick then..

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1 hour ago, Cool Hand said:

A diamond coated ball burr would be the go.  Quick and easy to achieve the effect.

XgiuY5e.jpg

i agree with Luke ...you can get one the right size and use a variable speed dremel tool..

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6 hours ago, yh70 said:

i think they would stick then..

What ever the technique chosen, A little trial and error would be in store. I agree with Doug’s original idea in that the bb’s would make a smooth dent. The Dremel bit would be on the rough side.  

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11 hours ago, Erik Smith said:

If you’re doing a Texas car, get out the big drill bit…

Everything’s bigger in Texas eh?😎

11 hours ago, Rick L said:

Heat the bb’s instead of the plastic. Then pour the bb’s over the cold plastic.

You would have to get the heat just right so it makes the divot but doesn’t melt right through.😬

45 minutes ago, jokar124 said:

Try an automatic, spring-loaded center punch to make your hail divot first. Enlarge with a drill bit after if desired.

I’d be worried that may crack or shatter the plastic.🤔

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1 hour ago, Rick L said:

The Dremel bit would be on the rough side.  

 Diamond burrs arent super coarse. If rough its easy enough to smooth out the hole by brushing on some Tamiya extra thin. 

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Thanks guys for all the replies.  A lot of good ideas here and something to experiment with.   I tried a bit myself this afternoon on a scrap body and a sizeable punch that had the end ground off sorta round.  Wish I had a set of roll pin punches.  Anyway the bigger "dents" were made with that long punch just hitting it by hand, the smaller dents were made with a center punch.  I taped a piece of cardboard under the roof panel to soften the blow a bit and hopefully not crack the panel.  To me, something looks a bit off.  Like it doesn't "stretch" the panel like it does on a piece of steel.    I'm gonna have to employ some of these ideas on here and see what I can come up with.    The build I'm doing is an AMT 57 Ford,  the one with the blue/yellow FLASHBACK drag car on the boxtop.  I want to try my hand at weathering,  a long forgotten  racer that was put out behind the shop and left to the elements.    Thanks again for all the ideas guys, I knew I could count on all of you.  I just hope I have the talent to pull off what I am envisioning🙂IMG_7783r.jpg.4215e2049c71c2289a1c560b2272a482.jpg

IMG_7785r.jpg.2bff6e330b5d8e710b85628e09434572.jpg

 

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How about using a soldering iron? It would be tricky. But, it may give you the effect you're after. I would try touching the tip to the body cold and then squeeze the trigger until it began to melt into it.

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9 hours ago, Plowboy said:

How about using a soldering iron? It would be tricky. But, it may give you the effect you're after. I would try touching the tip to the body cold and then squeeze the trigger until it began to melt into it.

Ah, you man a soldering gun (not a pencil type iron). I have not used one of those for over 40 years.  Problem with melting the dimples (using any sort of a hot tip) is that it will leave raised edges.  Yes, they can be sanded, but then the dimples sill still have steep edge. Hail damage dimples have gently curving edges.

I think what Doug did looks pretty convincing (but the dimples would need to be all closer to the same size (not large in one area, and small in other places). Doug was probably just experimenting, but if made more uniform size, they would looks realistic to me.

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10 hours ago, peteski said:

Ah, you man a soldering gun (not a pencil type iron). I have not used one of those for over 40 years.  Problem with melting the dimples (using any sort of a hot tip) is that it will leave raised edges.  Yes, they can be sanded, but then the dimples sill still have steep edge. Hail damage dimples have gently curving edges.

I think what Doug did looks pretty convincing (but the dimples would need to be all closer to the same size (not large in one area, and small in other places). Doug was probably just experimenting, but if made more uniform size, they would looks realistic to me.

Yep, I was experimenting.  The marks on rear half were done with the punch the body is leaning on, smaller dings were made with a center punch.  Will try a few more techniques over the weekend if I have a chance.

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On 4/14/2022 at 7:10 PM, Rick L said:

What ever the technique chosen, A little trial and error would be in store. I agree with Doug’s original idea in that the bb’s would make a smooth dent. The Dremel bit would be on the rough side.  

why dont u try that BB heat drop and get back to me..

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4 hours ago, Chariots of Fire said:

Think I'll stick to a smooth finish!😆

I think that is what I am gonna do myself.  I tried the heated up bb's to no avail.     It was a thought for a upcoming build I am planning.   We do get some vicious hail storms around these parts.    

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Doug, just going by the photos (since I can't see the model in-person), this looked like the best representation of hail strikes. 

IMG_7785r.jpg.2bff6e330b5d8e710b85628e09434572.jpg

But I think you'll be just as happy modeling vehicles that were spared from a hail storm, and are pristine, smooth and shiny.

Edited by peteski
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