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Removing paint from one piece window unit.


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Posted (edited)

Yesterday, I got a vintage 1961 Buick Wagon that I got from E Bay in the mail. It's nicely done and slightly hot rodded out. However, the windshield and back window that are one piece were painted over in flat black paint and I wish to remove it without harming both considering the plastic is over 50 years old. Any tips, advice or a line on a product that'll do the job is greatly appreciated. It's something that I haven't done before.

Edited by John M.
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To do this, the model has to be taken apart. Is that the plan anyway?

It's quite possible that the 50 year old glue has aged also. Depending on the amount of glue, some gentle pressure might free them. Also soaking the assembly in water and then freezing them might pop the glue joints. Best of luck.

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3 minutes ago, Jantrix said:

To do this, the model has to be taken apart. Is that the plan anyway?

It's quite possible that the 50 year old glue has aged also. Depending on the amount of glue, some gentle pressure might free them. Also soaking the assembly in water and then freezing them might pop the glue joints. Best of luck.

It was a screw bottom model and it came apart with ease and the window unit wasn't glued in.

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26 minutes ago, NOBLNG said:

 I believe Super Clean is the favourite product for this task. Type this into google:

site:modelcarsmag.com removing paint from windows

A big thank you. I'll check it out.

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99-proof isopropyl alcohol and a Q-tip will remove 'paint' from the plastic windows, no problem. Be patient, keep rubbing; it takes a few moments for the chemical effect to work...as far as Super Clean it may fog it up..

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In use Easy Off myself. Never had it adversely affect clear plastic.  , , BUT, flat black is notoriously hard to remove.  You may have to fall back on wet sanding and polishing like you would do to paint to get it off.

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, yh70 said:

99-proof isopropyl alcohol and a Q-tip will remove 'paint' from the plastic windows, no problem. Be patient, keep rubbing; it takes a few moments for the chemical effect to work...as far as Super Clean it may fog it up..

Super Clean will not harm the clear plastic.

That said, depending on the flat black paint used, it may not remove it either.

 

I have flat black painted parts that have soaked in Super Clean, and IPA, both for weeks, to no avail.

 

You may have to resort to brake fluid, but I have no idea what it will do to the clear plastic.

Don't know what adverse affects, (if any) that a product like Testors ELO would have on it either.

 

Your best bet might be to just replace the glass with clear plastic sheet, which looks more realistic than the overly thick kit glass anyway.

 

 

 

 

Steve

Edited by StevenGuthmiller
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Steve, ELO will remove the paint without causing the clear styrene to haze or fog. Just don't soak the glass, or any other parts, in it. Use a brush to apply it. Once the paint starts to lift, scrub the glass with a toothbrush using dishwashing liquid under warm water. Polish the glass to remove any scratches and give it a dip in the acrylic floor finish of your choice.

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After stripping the paint, the clear parts will require some extra care in handling.  Anything that will strip paint will make the clear plastic more brittle and easier to crack.  it's not the end of the world but just a little extra gentle handling.  The plastic can be polished with a mild abrasive like Meguiars cleaner wax but handle it carefully don't put a lot of pressure on it.

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9 hours ago, SfanGoch said:

Steve, ELO will remove the paint without causing the clear styrene to haze or fog. Just don't soak the glass, or any other parts, in it. Use a brush to apply it. Once the paint starts to lift, scrub the glass with a toothbrush using dishwashing liquid under warm water. Polish the glass to remove any scratches and give it a dip in the acrylic floor finish of your choice.

Thanks Joe.

I have no experience with it, so I wasn't sure.

 

 

Steve

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