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KanelKustoms

Something I have always been curios about.

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When I was a kid, that was my dream job. To sit around and get paid to build the models that were pictured on the box. Ahhh what fun it would be to build the very first one, plus have all those kits at your disposal to cut up when you didnt have to build "box stock" B)

Anyway, I am curios who builds them. What the process is of design, moldmaking (I am a machinist by trade) and the paint and build of the model you see on the box to the photography.

Any insight would be greatly appreciated. I am looking forward to learning about this.

Thanks

Gary

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Gary , I met one of the "Builder s " you spoke of at a I P M S show here in Richmond Virginia several years ago. he built several of the models for both A M T and M P C . He nwas selling a collection of 1961 A M T annuals that were really something to see too. He told me of the upheaval when A M T let Lesney /Matchbox get hold of the company in the early 1980's. he also was the same character who told me certain dies and tools were stolen from the company when they moved from Troy Michigan to I believe Maryland. Ed Shaver

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i can't think of everyone right now but Dave Darby and Mike Kollver come to mind. I have met Mike and seen his builds in person, he is a very good builder. Dave and I have emailed many times , but not so much recently and he has shared his box art builds through his fotki site. One thing I was educated on while talking to Dave was the fact none of the models he built had windows in them. They airbrushed the windows on the photo, something to do with glare in photos.

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Board members James Tester & Steve Goldman can be added to the list of boxart builders. I'm sure they'll chime in soon.

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I'm also not so sure about the builders being paid money to build the kits. They may get a little, but I think in return for their efforts they get a kit or two for themselves. I could be wrong but I seem to recall someone saying that once. Shoot, I'd be happy to build them just to be able to build them!

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I'm with you Bri, I'd build em for them, just to build them! I'm mean, box stock, nice paint, no need for lots detail, IF you need to do it at all,yeah, that sounds relaxing. B):lol: Too bad I can't DO that, caz yeah, it DOES sound relaxing! :D

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Sean Svendsen builds some too for MK. Not sure about any payment arrangements. I think he does get some kits, but he also does other stuff for him like design decal sheets. A club member, Tom Dillion, has also built models for boxes. He is lucky to have a couple back from the manufacturer. That was his only request and it turned out they sold them off.

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Testor's used to credit the builder on their boxes. Alan Day built many for Testor's in the 80s. I consider him to be one of the best box-stock builders ever.

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Some Box Art Models are built the Art Department of the respective Model Co but most are built by Modelers who are considered an outside resource. Each make there own deal on how they want to be compensated. Some sell the finished models to the Model Co, I prefer to "loan them" out with the promise they will be returned in good condition. I also get other compensation which includes plenty of samples. Some are built with specific instructions on colors and which optional parts to use. Most of the time I get a lot of artistic license to choose how to paint and finish the model.

I think the best part is when I get chance to help with new products. While I never had a chance to design a complete kit as that a job for the pro's I've been lucky enough to see some of my suggestions come to life. The only downside is there is always a deadline to keep. I've had to put many of my own projects on the back burner to make sure I get any promised jobs done in time. Last year I built about a dozen models, only two were for me. The rest were for Hawk-Lindberg. I also previously built quite a few for Model King who refered me to Lindberg. Before that I backed up Mike Kolver with some RC2-AMT projects. I hope that answered some of your questions.

-Steve

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Thanks Guys for the info. The box art has always been a huge inspiration. "To someday build it as good as the one on the box" I guess thats why I gave up on that and started cutting them up! LOL B)

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I've heard that you don't get a lot of time sometimes so it may not be the dream job you were hoping for.

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I've heard that you don't get a lot of time sometimes so it may not be the dream job you were hoping for.

It WAS a dream job when I was a kid, right up there with the pudding taster at Pizza Hut. I would however like to see the whole process some day.

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I know that Mark Jones (CA) built alot of the box models with his father at their kitchen table (alot of the kits in the 70's & 80's). His father, Lloyd, did alot of the decals and box models for the airplane world and did alot of the car ones too. Mark told me the story of sitting at the table as a young kid (about 12 years old) and his dad would let him do the interiors if they were not going to be pictured on the box. Once his skills "came up to speed", his dad would let him do some on the outside of the car. Eventually, Mark started doing the full builds, and decal masters for the kits. Today, he still does the masters for decals, and has even built models for Tamiya for their showroom in CA.

If I could have done that with my father at the kitchen table, that would have been really cool. His father still does work for the model airplane world (all scales).

If you want to know if you have one of the "Jones' " kits, look on the decal sheet for the little ruler and the words "ScaleMaster" above it. That is the name of the company they own.

David

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I've built a number of models for Revell and Monogram throughout the years, before I moved to Seattle. Generally I would get a package with 2 test shots and a list of the colors they wanted. Usually the kits were second round test shots that were almost ready for production. In some instances I was able to make suggestions for better color combinations, but usually I did them the way that Ed Sexton or Bill Lastovich requested. Usually I would only have a week or 10 days to get the model finished and mailed back - and yes Virginia, I was paid for the work.

Some of the models I've done include the drag version of the '68 Charger on the latest release, the metallic orange '69 Vette on the California Wheels release, the red Dodge Magnum, The black and red Porsche 911's on the original boxes, the red Acura NSX on the original box, the original tan '69 Dart, the Marina Blue '67 Chevelle SS and my favorite, the '66 Chevelle Wagon. The wagon was a pet project, as I own the real thing. As a matter of fact, all of the measurements for the tooling were done by me from my car, so that kit will always be near and dear to me.

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Testor's used to credit the builder on their boxes. Alan Day built many for Testor's in the 80s. I consider him to be one of the best box-stock builders ever.

Skip Samples here in San Diego use to build for Revell, but his did mostly aircraft. Both are members of the San Diego Model Car Club IPMS, and have been an inspiration to all. Alan is unfortunately no longer able to build due to father time, but Skip is very active.

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Terry Jessee has done several box art models as well.

My friend Kelly Cox built several prototypes and masters for the "Muscle Machines" caricature diecasts.

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Several questions answered here, but perhaps one that I would think of. How does one go about being "chosen" to do a model by any one of these companies? Thanks. Jody

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Several questions answered here, but perhaps one that I would think of. How does one go about being "chosen" to do a model by any one of these companies? Thanks. Jody

Simple - By knowing someone at the company and then showing them that you can do the work. I have done a lot of work for Tamiya and it came from my building a Tamiya/con winner, and then getting to know the people at the company. My first job was the Toyota TS 020 for their ad. Short fuse, demanding client, excellent model. Lots of stress and lots of fun.

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i can't think of everyone right now but Dave Darby and Mike Kollver come to mind. I have met Mike and seen his builds in person, he is a very good builder. Dave and I have emailed many times , but not so much recently and he has shared his box art builds through his fotki site. One thing I was educated on while talking to Dave was the fact none of the models he built had windows in them. They airbrushed the windows on the photo, something to do with glare in photos.

I know Mike Kollver. He's in our model club. I couldn't work under that pressure. They usually give you a short time period to complete the build. That can be problematic as Mike would sometimes use an existing build in his collection just to make the deadline. Then they have to be shipped to where ever they do the photography. Awesome job but very demanding.

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