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Rubbing Out Clear Coat?


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I like to start at 3200, unless it's REALLY rough, for some reason (or has a bunch of graphics underneath causing stepped edges, etc), get the whole thing to a consistent sheen with no high or low spots or visible orange peel and then work through 3600, 4000, 6000, 8000 and 12000 before polishing with Meguiar's Scratch X, then Novus #1 polish followed by Meguiar's Ultimate compound before wax.

I like to use a dehydrator to bake my lacquer for 24 hours after the final couple of coats, and then let it sit for another 24 before polishing.  If I'm not using the dehydrator, I'd normally allow at LEAST 7 days, or more if I can still smell the paint gassing out.

Some examples below, because who knows if people's advice is good on the internet or not without seeing their work ūüėÜ

 

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I use primarily Tamiya TS-13 clear as it lays down nice. My usual schedule is:

Let it dry for a few days before sanding. I'll start with 2000 then finish with 3000 or 5000 sanding wet with a drop of dish soap to keep the paper clean. (I've used this same process when color sanding 1:1 autos for years). I use 3M Trizact paper almost exclusively when color sanding.  You can get it from any good automotive paint supply store or Amazon. 

I then polish with 3M hand glaze. It is a very very mild compound. You don't want anything aggressive since you sanded all the way to 5000. I prefer the 3M brand as it has no silicone or wax and I can foil and detail right over it. After foiling, etc I use a good carnauba wax.

Here's a couple examples of the results using the process above.

 

 

 

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There's probably as many processes as there are builders out there. Mine is similar to RSchnell's. Only difference is I use the Tamiya compounds to polish with. I'm not a fan of the polishing cloths. Too much sanding and too many burn throughs for me! Since I switched to the Tamiya compounds, I haven't had a single burn through and I don't have to spray excessive clear on to allow for all of the sanding.

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2 hours ago, CabDriver said:

I like to start at 3200, unless it's REALLY rough, for some reason (or has a bunch of graphics underneath causing stepped edges, etc), get the whole thing to a consistent sheen with no high or low spots or visible orange peel and then work through 3600, 4000, 6000, 8000 and 12000 before polishing with Meguiar's Scratch X, then Novus #1 polish followed by Meguiar's Ultimate compound before wax.

I like to use a dehydrator to bake my lacquer for 24 hours after the final couple of coats, and then let it sit for another 24 before polishing.  If I'm not using the dehydrator, I'd normally allow at LEAST 7 days, or more if I can still smell the paint gassing out.

Some examples below, because who knows if people's advice is good on the internet or not without seeing their work ūüėÜ

 

1600348001324-vi.jpg

1619390140719-vi.jpg

1660096083105-vi.jpg

AHOLE9-vi.jpg

And what clear lacquer do u use Jim? 

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Micro-Mesh pads, starting at about 3600 and working down to 12000.

Then Novus #2 (Fine Scratch Remover) followed by Turtle Wax "Scratch and Swirl Remover".

 

I usually give the model a light once over with Novus #1 "Clean and Shine" once the model is assembled, (minus small exterior pieces such as mirrors and antennas) to shine it up and help eliminate static cling.

 

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Steve

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10 minutes ago, TransAmMike said:

And what clear lacquer do u use Jim? 

Mostly the Rustoleum stuff with the black chair on the can, but the same process works for me with the old Testors lacquer clear too, plus whatever clear enamel I can actually source that week.

That said, @RSchnell's process looks simpler and his results speak for themselves so maybe I should pick up the materials to try that!

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1 hour ago, CabDriver said:

That said, @RSchnell's process looks simpler and his results speak for themselves so maybe I should pick up the materials to try that!

It's a lot simpler! I used to use the polishing cloth system and I hated it! So much sanding! And even if you do make it to the 12000 grit without burning through, you still have to polish it to get rid of the haze. I used to only polish models I planned to show. But, with the Tamiya compounds, I polish every model just because it's so easy.

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23 minutes ago, Plowboy said:

It's a lot simpler! I used to use the polishing cloth system and I hated it! So much sanding! And even if you do make it to the 12000 grit without burning through, you still have to polish it to get rid of the haze. I used to only polish models I planned to show. But, with the Tamiya compounds, I polish every model just because it's so easy.

Which do you like  - these?

https://www.amazon.com/TAMIYA-Polishing-Compound-Fine-Finish/dp/B00XDRKEGC

They make a coarse compound too - I should maybe experiment with these!  I don't mind putting in the extra work if it's worth it, but I'm not anti finding a better way either!

 

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16 minutes ago, CabDriver said:

Which do you like  - these?

https://www.amazon.com/TAMIYA-Polishing-Compound-Fine-Finish/dp/B00XDRKEGC

They make a coarse compound too - I should maybe experiment with these!  I don't mind putting in the extra work if it's worth it, but I'm not anti finding a better way either!

 

I use all three Jim. I've polished around forty models with them and still have enough to do several more. Trust me, it's the best money you'll spend! I don't buy the applicator cloths. I use a high thread count cotton cloth to apply and remove it.

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19 minutes ago, Plowboy said:

I use all three Jim. I've polished around forty models with them and still have enough to do several more. Trust me, it's the best money you'll spend! I don't buy the applicator cloths. I use a high thread count cotton cloth to apply and remove it.

Awesome, I'm going to try that - I've seen your builds and the finish has always impressed me, so it's gotta be worth a few bucks to try out! 

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thanks everyone. my project is a little different as it actualy some really small wood I am clear coating but I knew this would be the place to ask based on the knowledge i know is here

 

this is the piece I clear coated the white spot at the top right is actually the sun reflecting off it. overall 3/4 inch square or about the size of my thumbnail. three coats of clear lacquer there is just a bit of orange peel to it

 

JbQVnXM.jpg

 

Edited by jaxenro
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I just got the Micro-Mesh Pads and did a test on a panel painted black and cleared with Rusto Crystal Clear Acrylic Lacquer. The clear has dried for almost 2 weeks so it surely was plenty dry. I started with the 3000, then 6000, 8000 and finally the 12000. I came out smooth but after polishing it has a lot of fine scratches.  Did I maybe use too much pressure??

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48 minutes ago, TransAmMike said:

I just got the Micro-Mesh Pads and did a test on a panel painted black and cleared with Rusto Crystal Clear Acrylic Lacquer. The clear has dried for almost 2 weeks so it surely was plenty dry. I started with the 3000, then 6000, 8000 and finally the 12000. I came out smooth but after polishing it has a lot of fine scratches.  Did I maybe use too much pressure??

did you do all the sanding in one direction? I alternate direction with each pad and only get scratches if i pick up dirt on the pads

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40 minutes ago, stitchdup said:

did you do all the sanding in one direction? I alternate direction with each pad and only get scratches if i pick up dirt on the pads

Yep, one direction. I used water with a little dish detergent. Don't  think dirt was a problem but I'm sure it was too much pressure. 

 

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, TransAmMike said:

Yep, one direction. I used water with a little dish detergent. Don't  think dirt was a problem but I'm sure it was too much pressure. 

 

 

 

 

you might find less scratches if you alternate from side to side, with up and down each time you change pad. if you do all the sanding in one direction all each pad does is polish the scratches with the clear, when you alternate the pads they reduce the scratches because you are going across the scratches. Also if you feel any shuddering from the pad you will have some tiny specs of dust somewhere. A little dish soap helps to

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5 hours ago, stitchdup said:

you might find less scratches if you alternate from side to side, with up and down each time you change pad. if you do all the sanding in one direction all each pad does is polish the scratches with the clear, when you alternate the pads they reduce the scratches because you are going across the scratches. Also if you feel any shuddering from the pad you will have some tiny specs of dust somewhere. A little dish soap helps to

Thank you Les. I did use dish soap. Since I went in one direction and probably used too much pressure I think it was the issue. Thankfully it was on a test panel. 

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11 minutes ago, TransAmMike said:

Thank you Les. I did use dish soap. Since I went in one direction and probably used too much pressure I think it was the issue. Thankfully it was on a test panel. 

good luck with it, once the scratches are hard to see with your eye is when i would use compounds, but i usually get a lot of orange peel which needs knocking back. I've only had one build i didn't need to polish and i ended up having to strip it because the glue on another kit wrecked the paint, lol

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1 hour ago, stitchdup said:

good luck with it, once the scratches are hard to see with your eye is when i would use compounds, but i usually get a lot of orange peel which needs knocking back. I've only had one build i didn't need to polish and i ended up having to strip it because the glue on another kit wrecked the paint, lol

Well I have 2 black paint jobs waiting to be cleared so we will see.

Thanks s again. 

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Posted (edited)

First off thanks for the advice and posting all these great paint jobs there is some beautiful work here eye candy for sure

Second the advice was perfect. Since I am doing wood it is probably easier but I gave it a few days to dry, remember it is only the size of a postage stamp, then flooded some 2000 grit sandpaper with linseed oil (which is on the wood under the lacquer as well) and wet sanded away the orange peel. Followed by polishing with an old cotton flannel I now have a finish that rivals or exceeds the ones I have seen on some of the costliest furniture

I do some car modeling but also 1:12 scale wood furniture and sterling silver sculpture and have been working on upgrading my finishing techniques and this was a big improvement

you can see in one of my earlier efforts the wood just doesn't have the finish I am looking for (at 1:12 Marc Antony is about 1.5" tall)

gm53ZJP.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by jaxenro
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On 9/30/2022 at 5:23 PM, TransAmMike said:

I just got the Micro-Mesh Pads and did a test on a panel painted black and cleared with Rusto Crystal Clear Acrylic Lacquer. The clear has dried for almost 2 weeks so it surely was plenty dry. I started with the 3000, then 6000, 8000 and finally the 12000. I came out smooth but after polishing it has a lot of fine scratches.  Did I maybe use too much pressure??

You will still need to polish it to get rid of the fine scratches. That's what I hated about the polishing pads! All that sanding and you still have to polish! It shouldn't take much polishing to get rid of the fine scratches. Maybe try the 3M glaze posted above.

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15 hours ago, Plowboy said:

You will still need to polish it to get rid of the fine scratches. That's what I hated about the polishing pads! All that sanding and you still have to polish! It shouldn't take much polishing to get rid of the fine scratches. Maybe try the 3M glaze posted above.

Well Roger I did polish with automotive polishing compounds and the fine scratches were still there. Luckily it was just a test panel I did.

Yesterday I went over the 2 black painted bodies (Createx Opaque Black) with the 12000 pad using water with a few drops of dish soap.  They were actually pretty smooth before I sanded. I did not get any scratches and it came out even smoother.  Clearing next with the Rusto Crystal Clear Acrylic Lacquer.

 

 

 

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I just got through compounding earlier, but still got to polish.  2k was ready to go after 4 hours @ 120F in the dehydrator.  No need for 24 hours or weeks.  Depending on the situation I'll use 2K grit, 3K grit, 5K grit all from 3M, and than i compound, polish, wax(wax is always last because BMF, etc).  I use these with a mini dremel @ 2K rpms.  Trying to compound and polish 2K you'll be there for days trying to cut with a a cloth n finger.  I use orange(Medium cut) for compound, black(light cut) for polish, and yellow(No cut) for wax.  These are SO much better than using polishing wheels.

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On 10/4/2022 at 6:56 PM, Dpate said:

I just got through compounding earlier, but still got to polish.  2k was ready to go after 4 hours @ 120F in the dehydrator.  No need for 24 hours or weeks.  Depending on the situation I'll use 2K grit, 3K grit, 5K grit all from 3M, and than i compound, polish, wax(wax is always last because BMF, etc).  I use these with a mini dremel @ 2K rpms.  Trying to compound and polish 2K you'll be there for days trying to cut with a a cloth n finger.  I use orange(Medium cut) for compound, black(light cut) for polish, and yellow(No cut) for wax.  These are SO much better than using polishing wheels.

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where did yoy get these, i have a small rotary tool also.

i mite get better results than hamd rubbing.

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