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Paint Booths & Safe Ventilation?

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Great, I'll first of all tell my friend to stop. He's shooting faskolor for lexan (polycarbonate) rc bodies under the fan. That's why I wondered if it was a good idea or not.

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Faskolor is water based. Theres no need to vent

It may be water based, but not good to breath anyway. I would vent any paint I am spraying.

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Always good to vent anyway. But 20 mins of spraying faskolor wont kill ya. Youve got more of a chance to get sick walking city streets with the smog.

Id be more scared of the over spray being seen by wife/girlfriend/mother lol easily cleaned but if ya miss a spot lol

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If you are handy enough with a saw (and can use it in your new digs) you have many options . What James has said will work fine.

Are you going to leave it in the window or take it out when you are done?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-Hose-Exhaust-Extension-For-Airbrush-Craft-Spray-Booth-Odor-Extractor-Paint-60-/290874658920?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43b97b1068

This is a hose kit for a single exhaust , you might need two. Not the cheapest but give it a look for a different option. This would leave more of the window light in, and harder for the pesky lookie loos from seeing what you have in the window.

I was planning on making something that could be removed when not in use. The link you posted is cool, and would work but more than I wanted to spend. I will see if I can just make my own.

I simply picked up a pre-cut 5/8" plywood shelf at Menard's, cut that to the width of my sash window, then used a hole saw to cut the opening for a common 4" dryer vent.

When I get to airbrushing, I merely open the window, insert this plywood plate (which has its dryer hose permanently attached, then close the sash down on it, which securely traps the unit. Works very, very well.

Art

This was the easiest I could think of as well, but was hoping there was something that looked a little nicer to just to keep any one from getting to worried about was in the window. Thankfully the window is over a garage entrance so its not an area in view of many units.

.

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My booth uses a range hood I usually have to use it's lowest speed setting or the paint won't make it on the body. I wouldn't mind having a better professional booth

Edited by my80malibu

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especially given that you are using water based paint, I don't think its a particularly bad idea. not ideal certainly, but with an airbrush you shouldn't be getting that much overspray anyway, especially compared to with a buzzcan. more the problem mentioned of messing the place up and certainly it would be best to rig something nicer up.

jb

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Wow, thats crazy,, lol, I am building a paint booth and using fans and maybe the whole "laptop cooling fan unit" the kind at walmart for last I seen was 16.88! Fans are a pair, and can run on a 12 or 6v battery, im using a heavy duty baby diaper Box, huggies, lol and bounce fabric softer sheets for disposable filters, ill post pics and let ya know how it works, after I make it this weekend,

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well booboo, if its enclosed like that and drawing all your overspray in exhaust past that fan, make SURE that fan is rated to be in airflow of volatile material. lots of stories of fumes building up and the spark from the fan causes them to explode and usually the wife does too. the only thing that made the original semi-ok was he is shooting water based colors.

jb

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Alan,

Propeller fans may work great in a computer, However they don't make enough pressure to overcome friction loss if you are going to attach vent pipe or filters. Trust me on this one!!! I do air calculations on a regular basis and fan laws support my claims

Edited by jwrass

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I know there are a lot of threads on spray booths but I couldn't find the answer I was looking for.

I live it a desert climate with high winds. In the summer it is regularly 110 and up. This means two things; the wind is always blowing dust and dirt around and my A/C is always on for half the year, which also blows cap around. There is always dust blowing around. This has done everything short of making me just quit building all together. It's been devastating to my motivation, I have never 100% completed a model.

I have always had a spray booth of some sort, which has helped a lot, but I want to do this right and be done

2 factors at play here: 1. The inevitable dust floating around. 2. I can't afford to build any type of completely enclosed room, and I don't have the space for it, or so I think.

I want to build my own booth rather than buy one. Not to save money but to be able to do it just the way it needs to be done. My current booth uses a 80cfm ceiling fan. I'm going to utilize two fans for a total of 300-500 cfm on the new booth.

I have a few questions/ concerns:

1. Is it possible to control or eliminate the dust immediately in front of the booth. With the cfm I plan on running I am afraid it will draw dust into the booth and just making it worse.

2. What would be the ideal style flow for the booth. Down draft? Should I have filters in multiple areas?

3. What would it take to build a stand up, fully enclosed booth? I don't have the room for a sit down booth. I have one room for myself for this hobby, but it triples as my office and guest room, so I don't get the whole thing. I'm 6,3", 250, so I figured a stand up booth would be more space friendly.

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High CFM will pull dust into the booth. It could even pull it in from another room.

Thats what I was afraid of. I can't think of anyou way to manage the dust without an actual room

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if it's in a garage or utility room, dampen the floor an hour before you paint?

Doesn't matter, dust is in the air. There is a sand dune across the street, I literally live in the desert. We regularly see 30-40mph winds. It's minor, but I have ruined so many great paint jobs because there was dust or hair in it. I can only paint with fast drying acrylics or lacquers, enamels are out of the questions.

I have been fighting this for years, always looking for a solution. i am coming to the conclusion that I need an enclosure or it simply won't work.

My main problem is I have gotten to the point where I feel I should be able to have the space in my room, I shouldn't have to go out into the garage to airbrush, but I'm thinking that's what I will have to do. It's either get this figured out or quit the hobby, because I simply cannot complete a model. I have a dozen or so that are done, except the bodies have bad paint jobs or have been stripped so many times they're ruined.

I think I might just suck it up and build an enclosure in the garage. I can't afford the room inside right now. i have a 7 month old. When he is old enough, we can move the full bed out of this room and into his room. Then I will be able to have a little more freedom. I need to do something now though. This hobby keeps me in check and it's been 6 months since I've touched anything on my bench.

If you want to totally eliminate dust, you've got to create an enclosure. This is what I did.

http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=76088

Thank you. i am going to read through this. I thought about a blasting booth, but I wasn't sure how it would work. I'm not a fan of handling things with the bulky gloves.

Edit: I read the thread. I'm very picky when I wear gloves, i have to be able to feel stuff that I'm touching with detail or I just fumble around. I want to check out those vet gloves you use and see if they might work for me. This might work out in the end, as I can set it up in the room or the garage and have it be somewhat mobile.

One thing I am going to do is drill a hole in the wall of my house and put a PVC pipe through it. Spackle it up and touch up the stucco, caulk around it on the inside, add a one way, spring loaded trap door on the outside, that can be operated from the inside. This way I have a permanent, professional and clean looking vent that can be sealed off from the outside. if I ever need to eliminate it, I can stuff it with insulation and patch over it.

Edited by Quick GMC

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Thank you. i am going to read through this. I thought about a blasting booth, but I wasn't sure how it would work. I'm not a fan of handling things with the bulky gloves.

This cabinet from Harbor Freight can be adapted

http://www.harborfreight.com/abrasive-blast-cabinet-42202.html

I wanted a lot of room so I built my own. I've got about $240 total in it, including the bilge pump , tubing and other miscellaneous stuff.

The gloves I use can be bought here. They're very thin, inexpensive and work great.

QC Supply

PO Box 581

Schuyler, NE 68661-0581

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Thank you. Is it pretty self explanatory how the gloves attach or did you have to modify anything?

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A furnace filter taped to a box fan also helps pull dust out of the air in your house. You just can not run it right before you paint. It will work as a dust collector. My dad does it at his old farm house and it helps. Just put the filter on the pull side.

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How about building a framework from PVC pipes and draping plastic from it, sort of like a portable shower enclosure? You would have to overcome the static electricity that would probably be present around your actual painting booth, but the larger enclosure should help with dust intrusion into the space. Barring that kind of setup, the large enclosure that Tom built would be your best bet and you could probably configure the arm holes so that you have sort of a gasket that you stick your arms through and you can just wear normal nitrile gloves. I live near the ocean so I would love to have your low desert humidity!

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How about building a framework from PVC pipes and draping plastic from it, sort of like a portable shower enclosure? You would have to overcome the static electricity that would probably be present around your actual painting booth, but the larger enclosure should help with dust intrusion into the space. Barring that kind of setup, the large enclosure that Tom built would be your best bet and you could probably configure the arm holes so that you have sort of a gasket that you stick your arms through and you can just wear normal nitrile gloves. I live near the ocean so I would love to have your low desert humidity!

The humidity increases every few years. For a month or so it's pretty brutal. last year we had a week of 116-119, humidity in the 70% range. PURE DEATH.

I use these things called Zip Wall for my business, they are designed specifically for this, and they can be broken down in a minute. The PVC pipe idea reminded me that I have these.

You can even add a zipper flap

https://www.zipwall.com/

I really like that Artograph booth, but the only way it will work is if I have it sealed off. This may be the answer. I love the blast cabinet, but I don't know if I would be able to handle that. I hate feeling constricted and I have a feeling having my arms in a box is going to drive me nuts.

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Thank you. Is it pretty self explanatory how the gloves attach or did you have to modify anything?

The 5" PVC plumbing flanges I used for arm holes protrude about 3/4" out the front. I put the gloves through the opening and fold the ends over the flange. I always take a piece of duct tape and tape it down to prevent the plastic sleeves from tearing. They are held in place with large hose clamps. You've just about gotten me motivated to do a short video with more details about the booth and how it is set up and works.

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The 5" PVC plumbing flanges I used for arm holes protrude about 3/4" out the front. I put the gloves through the opening and fold the ends over the flange. I always take a piece of duct tape and tape it down to prevent the plastic sleeves from tearing. They are held in place with large hose clamps. You've just about gotten me motivated to do a short video with more details about the booth and how it is set up and works.

Thank you

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If you want to totally eliminate dust, you've got to create an enclosure. This is what I did.

http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=76088

Cameron,

I have designed and sprayed in many 1:1 booths and I find Tom's design to be the closest thing to a real 1:1 booth out their ( great job Tom!!!!)

I don't know why these manufactures keep calling their booths, booths They are exhaust fans!!!! or the equivalent to prep stations in a paint shop without the make up air.

The true definition of a booth is a pressure controlled closed environment, Meaning: Incoming Air Treatment, Outgoing Air Treatment, Pressures, Temp. humidity etc. Designing a booth has many different calculations that go into the success of a booth that performs well. I won't get into them here ( if you want to pm me I will expound further) Only the basics! To insure clean paint work in your conditions you need to bring in filtered outside air also know as Make up air with a pleated type filter in the air stream, The incoming air should have the a better quality filter than the exhaust fan filter ( much of that has to do with the EPA rules of the area 1:1) I doubt you will be getting permits yada yadas to do your project. I would use the same type of filters on the intake and exhaust.

When you put a enclosure inside a enclosure (Booth, Room) you need to have a slight positive pressure on the booth in relationship to the room to create a positive or exfiltration of the air to prevent sucking in trash from the space the booth is in, just a small amount of air will do.

On 1:1 systems the incoming air (make up air) is typically treated with a heat cycle or dehumidification cycle to insure year round production! As not to be waiting for that perfect day to paint as project time = $$$$$

I personally feel 300 to 500 cfm is way overkill, however if you go that route I would put speed controls on the motors to fine tune your airflows on shaded pole motors, a simple rheostat will do. 100 to 150 cfm should be more than adequate! for your booth, again I would use speed controls as this inexpensive feature lets you fine tune your system. Keep the motors out of the air stream and stay away from propeller type fan blades as their resistance to over come static pressure in any type of duct work is very poor.

I hope this helps!!!! jwrass

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