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What In The World Do I Use Tamiya X-21 Flat Base For?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

hi every one i went look though my paints box and noticed i have a bottle of Tamiya flat base X-21 can some one tell me what i use it for and how to use it thanks lol

Edited by moparfan426

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Posted · Report post

I think its for making the gloss paints dull when mixed for airbrushing.

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Posted · Report post

I think its for making the gloss paints dull when mixed for airbrushing.

sounds like it i was going to try putting some in my bottle of tamiya light green to make it flat hmmm ill wait to see what others say first lol

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Posted · Report post

I think its for making the gloss paints dull when mixed for airbrushing.

thanks mike

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Posted · Report post

I have not personally used this product, but from what I've been told, read, etc. it is used as a flattening agent.

add it to Tamiya paints to eliminate the "gloss". I'm not sure what the mixing ratio is for proper use. But, from what has been told to me, if you add a little bit, it will be more of a satin finish...add a bit more, you get a flat finish. I have also heard that you can mix some in with Future and use that as a "satin" or "flat" clear.

As i stated, I'm not sure of the mixing ratio. I'm sure someone that has used it will chime in a suggest a good mix ratio. My guess would be to try 4:1 (4 parts paint, 1 part flat base). Like with any other paint product, i would experiment on a practice body. And be sure to thoroughly mix the concoction.

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Posted · Report post

When added to a gloss acrylic paint it will de-gloss the finish by varying degrees, determined by the ratio.

anywhere from semi-gloss to flat

I have used it without any problems with different brands of acrylic paints besides Tamiya

mostly used for brushing...haven't tried air brushing

if I need a flat finish and it involves spraying something, I spray the gloss color, then i whip out the "Dullcote"

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Posted · Report post

hmmmm thanks guys MORE ANSWERS PLEASE LOL

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Posted · Report post

I've been trying to figure out how to use that stuff, too. I'll be going by a couple of hobby shops tomorrow, if time permits, I'll stop in and ask.

I remember when I was a kid, Pactra had flattening agent for its paints, but being quite young when you could get it, I couldn't really understand how to use it; I was surprised Testors never offered it, but it's good to know that I can use it in other acrylic lines. This actually opens up a lot of possibilities for doing interiors, as a lot of the colors aren't too far off, but are glossy.

Honestly, I wish Testors would re-introduce the Pactra line, I liked their colors.

Charlie Larkin

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Posted · Report post

I've been trying to figure out how to use that stuff, too. I'll be going by a couple of hobby shops tomorrow, if time permits, I'll stop in and ask.

I remember when I was a kid, Pactra had flattening agent for its paints, but being quite young when you could get it, I couldn't really understand how to use it; I was surprised Testors never offered it, but it's good to know that I can use it in other acrylic lines. This actually opens up a lot of possibilities for doing interiors, as a lot of the colors aren't too far off, but are glossy.

Honestly, I wish Testors would re-introduce the Pactra line, I liked their colors.

Charlie Larkin

thanks charlie let me know what u find out

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I learned something here.

I have a bottle of this and tried it on tires and it was awful. BUT, using it as a flattening agent [it's true use] is what I'll now do.

Thanks guys

Bob

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Posted · Report post

Okay...while on my way to my parents this afternoon, I stopped at a hobby shop and asked about the flattening compound.

The answer: you have to experiment. The use of the product really is as nebulus and unclear as it looks. The 4:1 starting point sounds good and will knock down shine I think. I would think a 1:1 or 1.5:1 paint/flattening compound would be best for a normal flat finish, myself.

I'd suggest doing the following:

1. Get a piece of white styrene sheet and prime it to make absolutely sure there's a good base for the paint. Leave about a half-inch between color samples.

2. Using some type of graduated measure, like a medicine cup, record your amounts like so.

Sample 1: Gloss, no alteration.

Sample 2: 4:1 (the color is the first number always.)

Sample 3: 3:1

Sample 4: 2:1

Sample 5: 1:1

Remember, every paint color will be different, as will each bottle of paint, but this will give you an idea of what will happen and serve as a reasonable predictor.

I'd also suggest doing this in a grid, headed like a chart, with space to make notes, which should be made with a Sharpie or something like that.

Further, I'd also suggest doing a combination of colors- light, mid-tone, flat, and maybe even some metallics.

This is a suggestion as to how to lay your chart out; I'd use a large sheet of styrene:

Tamyia Flattening Compound Chart

Color: Black White Tan Silver

Gloss

4-to-1

3-to-1

2-to-1

1-to-1

Charlie Larkin

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Okay...while on my way to my parents this afternoon, I stopped at a hobby shop and asked about the flattening compound.

The answer: you have to experiment. The use of the product really is as nebulus and unclear as it looks. The 4:1 starting point sounds good and will knock down shine I think. I would think a 1:1 or 1.5:1 paint/flattening compound would be best for a normal flat finish, myself.

I'd suggest doing the following:

1. Get a piece of white styrene sheet and prime it to make absolutely sure there's a good base for the paint. Leave about a half-inch between color samples.

2. Using some type of graduated measure, like a medicine cup, record your amounts like so.

Sample 1: Gloss, no alteration.

Sample 2: 4:1 (the color is the first number always.)

Sample 3: 3:1

Sample 4: 2:1

Sample 5: 1:1

Remember, every paint color will be different, as will each bottle of paint, but this will give you an idea of what will happen and serve as a reasonable predictor.

I'd also suggest doing this in a grid, headed like a chart, with space to make notes, which should be made with a Sharpie or something like that.

Further, I'd also suggest doing a combination of colors- light, mid-tone, flat, and maybe even some metallics.

This is a suggestion as to how to lay your chart out; I'd use a large sheet of styrene:

Tamyia Flattening Compound Chart

Color: Black White Tan Silver

Gloss

4-to-1

3-to-1

2-to-1

1-to-1

Charlie Larkin

thanks charlie

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Posted · Report post

Might be just the ticket for those flat and semi-gloss paint jobs that are all the rage in Europe right now. Lotus is making a seriously bad Elise that's semi-gloss black with a glossy black stripe. (A kit would be to die for.) But black isn't the only color. Some competition-style Aston-Martins and others are semi-gloss green and other colors. Flat paint jobs are cutting edge stuff in the EU.

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I asked this Q over on the old Hobby Heaven board some time ago, and Evan Hermel answered:

"For a pure flat, I use gloss: flat in 3:1-5:1 ratio. For a semi gloss, try a 10:1 ratio."

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I asked this Q over on the old Hobby Heaven board some time ago, and Evan Hermel answered:

"For a pure flat, I use gloss: flat in 3:1-5:1 ratio. For a semi gloss, try a 10:1 ratio."

thanks man just wondering is that 10 drops? of paint ? like u said 10:1? that's whats confusing me lol

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The guy at my LHS said it was to be mixed in with gloss colors to dull them out. which it did with good results, though I too just winged it so I don't know the exact science either. Glad you brought this up because I want to try it with the Tamiya Acrylic Clear and see if I can mix-up a brushable dull coat.

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The guy at my LHS said it was to be mixed in with gloss colors to dull them out. which it did with good results, though I too just winged it so I don't know the exact science either. Glad you brought this up because I want to try it with the Tamiya Acrylic Clear and see if I can mix-up a brushable dull coat.

no problem bud

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