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The history of a small filling station


Eshaver
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Built in 1923 at the corner of Roseneath Road and Patterson Avenue in Richmond Virginia This station survived as is to 1965.

In 1965 , the city Fire Marshall deemed the entire structure to be in violation of fire saftey codes as it was built from Stucco over a wood frame . These buildings were then replaced by a very bland Brick Colonial Revivial building with a single attached garage which replaced the outdoor lift .

It's not known exactly for certain in what years this station was a dealer for Conoco Oil products . It was known that Conoco was sold up to at least 1940. Sometime at that point , the station was re- branded as a Richfield Oil station as the main Jobber has records that were lent to me in researching this building . This is also where I have childhood memories of going up to this station and buying Coca - Colas for a nickel !

In 1965 as I mentioned , the building was replaced by a very bland Colonial Revivial building with a single attached garage which then replaced the outdoor grease rack. It was also the end of the Richfield era as well. Sinclair which was actually the parent company of Richfield from back in 1930 when Richfield went bankrupt and then operated as two companies , Richfield New York and Richfield of California .

In 1968, the Sinclair name gave way to B P Oil of England as the former Sinclair jobber , Dennis Oil became a dealer for them then . At the same time, Atlantic Refining , ( A Former Standard Oil trust company ), Richfield Oil , and Sinclair oil had merged into the new company known today as Arco of Los Angles oil company. The tiony corner station operated as a B P until the middle 1980's when it became a Dry Cleaner drop off point . This model represents " Experimental cars in a What - If senerio in 1965.

changingtheoil.jpg

Fillinerup.jpg

Luniversalle.jpg

Turbinecar.jpg

Ed Shaver

Edited by Eshaver
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Excellent diorama, Ed!

You have preserved some lost automobilia history in miniture. Its unfortunate that younge folks today will never get a chance to experience the corner service stations as a hangout like we used to.

The village I grew up in had 4 gas stations all with their own characters and personalities. Now there is just one gas bar and the locals don't use it unless they have to.

Thanks

Carl

Edited by dptydawg
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Thank you Bill, thanks Carl............ the station really is 1-24th scale . The office building really was 10 X 10 by 18 ft at the top . I have a hand written copy of the building permit too. Oh for what it's worth, we actually saw the Turbine car re- fuel on occasion at this place too . Ed Shaver

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Ed, Carl's right, the kids these days only know Stop an Shop types of gas stations. The cool Castle lookin or the neet Old Cottage types are just consigned to our memories. that's why your stations mean ALOT to us old farts! i remember days ridin up to them an puttin air in the rear slick of my Schwinn Stingray, WITH metalflake bannana seat! Buyin a 8.oz Coke for a dime! Or goin to the dimestore an gettin an AMT model for 1.02 with lawnmowin money!smile.gifwink.gif

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Really cool Ed! Who'da thunk a buncha paper & plastic could spark such a lively discussion abouts dem good old days!? You's really got a knack fer the historicals. I's glad I got to work at a real live Amoco station from '69 to '73 when all the muscle cars was out & about. The dingin' air hose bell, rear bumpbumps 4' up in the air when them young punk hot rodders would pump up their air shox laugh.gif Seriously, I put gas in some kids Tempest on nite and his back bumpbump was almost high as me nipples!

Can't imagine you on a Shewinny StingRay George!blink.gif Guess you know'd what you was a doin' when you pumped dat slik up with the comp air. A buddy of mine used to hang out at the station, and tried helpin' a couple young kids put air in their bicycle tires-- blowed both of 'em right up!laugh.gif poor kids!

I always wished I coulda kept doing that kinda job, the pumpin' gas, checkin' the oil, washin' windshields, takin' inventory, and puttin' snow tires on.............but the times they was achangin'. T'anks Ed, fer bringin' a lot of cool memeories back fer a lot of us over the freakin' hill types. smile.gif

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Capt'n I bought that Candy Blue Stinkray with my OWN paper route money. That bad boy cost me a WHOLE 80.00 bucks in the summer of 68! I was 15 and my dad took me to Al Petries Bike Shop on Fort Street in Lincoln Park. (It's STILL there too!). He TRIED to talk me into a Huffy, "It's the SAME bike Mijo" (mexican for son)he would say, But NOPE Pop, I LOVES ya an think the WORLD of your advice,BUT, I GOTTA have me a SCHWINN Stingray!!! No cheep wanna be was gonna cut it! I'm STILL that way, If I want somethin, I'll get it!

That's why I drive Cadillacs!!!laugh.gifwink.gif

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Hey Ed, I always love those gas stations and dioramas you do. Great piece of history and I miss seeing and working in those places when I was growing up! Good old full service stations and 60 cents a gallon gas! Keep up the great work my friend! :D

~ Jeff

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  • 3 weeks later...

Naw Aaron, THOSE bad boys were the "Crate"series! they came out about 69/70. AND they cost about a 150.00 bucks! MORE than I could afford! But they were BAD! 5 speed rear axle, REALLY cool colors an the first ones had DRUM brakes in the front, WITH springer type front forks!!The later ones actually had a DISC brake!!! Yeah, THEY were the cats A$$!!!! Mine was a plain ol Stingray, with a white metalic silver seat an 2 spd kick-back rear axle! WITH hub cleaners!laugh.gifwink.gif

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  • 1 month later...

Absolutely beautiful diorama Ed. You really know your gas stations.

My first job out of high school

was working for Standard Oil Company at a company owned gas station. Back when we wore white uniforms and

regular gas was 26 cents a gallon. We had three pump colors back then. Red for regular, Blue for Supreme,

and White for custom supreme. And you got service back then. Windows washed, oil checked, tires checked and

all for 26 cents a gallon. Those WERE the days. I am glad that some of the old gas stationa have been restored

and added to the registry of national historic sites.

Glad to know someone with so much knowledge of old gas stations.

Thanks Ed.

Dennis

Edited by KarDude.com
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  • 3 weeks later...

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