Bugatti Royale

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A notecard from a series I did back in '84. Pen and ink on mylar done with individual color separations. A computer would have made the job easier, but it was 1984! The registrations and final ink printing order were corrected, so that the black overlayed the silver for better effect. This is a scan of a printer's proof.

Edited by Jim Gibbons

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Posted · Report post

A notecard from a series I did back in '84. Pen and ink on mylar done with individual color separations.

Wow! Stone Age art production! :D

(I remember it well... ;))

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Posted · Report post

Wow! Stone Age art production! :)

(I remember it well... ;))

Oh yeah...me too, remember waxing machines and rubber cement for pasting up copy, etc? Daisy wheel typesetting machines....the good ol' days?????

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That's a cool print, the scary thing is that I can completely visualize the process that you describe.

Oh yeah...me too, remember waxing machines and rubber cement for pasting up copy, etc? Daisy wheel typesetting machines....the good ol' days?????

I ran printing presses in 1984 and knew of one shop that had a Linotype machine that they still used! With the lead used in those old typecasting machines, I'm sure they've been banned by now.

I used to run hairline registration on an AB Dick 360 with only about 12% loss. Using an AM 1250 only cut that down to about 8%.

:)

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I remember those days, I worked in a catalog studio, started in keyline/pasteup. We had the first photo composition

computer back in 1974 I think it was called Citex, not sure on the spelling, the operator had to sign a 5 year non-

discloser agreement.

Bill

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Posted · Report post

I remember those days, I worked in a catalog studio, started in keyline/pasteup. We had the first photo composition

computer back in 1974 I think it was called Citex, not sure on the spelling, the operator had to sign a 5 year non-

discloser agreement.

Bill

Scitex.

Wow... ancient history! :)

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