'53 Hudson Hornet is coming....

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Still more detail questions, if you don't mind. What appears to be a metal water hose exits from the top of the front housing, and runs down the side of the head above the intake, where it terminates between the two carbs for a rubber hose to take it to the firewall.

So the Q is, don't heater cores have a return hose to the block? Where is the one on the Hudson?

ayattheWalterPChryslerMuseum01-vi.jpg

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Here are two pics, first one shows heater hose position on water pump, second one, you can see the plug on the side of the head by the second to last spark plug, hose goes there.

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post-136-0-43554000-1329955208_thumb.jpg

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To be truthful,the best 'reference' pic I have seen of the heater hose assembly is in Bill and Len's article. It's difficult to get a nice, uncluttered look at it in most online photos I've dug up. Next time I'm in the vicinity of a 1:1 step-down Hudson, I'll be sure to snap a few photos.

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Thanks for the heads up Chuck. I just started on my first Hudson and have three more on the shelf. Now I can't wait for the second run. I already made the mod to the skirts and it centered the axle perfect. Thanks again.

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Here's a revised and updated version...

BUILDING IMPRESSIONS:

Test fit as you go- quite a few of the locator holes will need to be opened up in order to receive the pins on the parts they are meant to locate. “Positive fit” is the name of the game with this kit… the assembled engine/transmission locks into the chassis very securely- two holes in the oil pan slot onto pins molded to the front crossmember and tie rod, and a rectangular tab on the bellhousing fits into a similarly-shaped slot on the trans crossmember. There are also two flat pads on the front of the engine which sit on corresponding pads on the frame, replicating the 1:1 engine mounts.

The tires required no heat or kneading to accept the wheels, but I recommend sliding the wheels in from behind, as the ‘paddles’ molded to the inside of the wheel will mar the whitewall if you insert the wheel from the front. Chase out the mounting bosses to clear out any chrome plating residue trapped inside- this will eliminate any chance of splitting the mounting boss as you try to insert the axle into the wheel. That isn’t needed with the Marshall Teague version, the wheels in that kit are not plated.

If you aren’t happy with the color of the taillamps, a pass or two with a red Sharpie or your favorite clear red should do the trick. The lenses are molded clear and painted red at the factory, so you can strip and completely refinish if that’s your thing.

All of the Hornets I’ve built had some degree of minor warp in the chassis, but fitting it to its mounting holes in the floorboard and clamping it into place as the glue sets will eliminate the problem. Clamping isn’t really necessary, though- I do it more for my own peace of mind more than anything.

The completed chassis/interior assembly slots cleanly into the body and fits tightly- you could probably get away with skipping the glue for this step. The chassis-to-body fit is very satisfying- the best I’ve seen. You may want to sand down the sides of the radiator if you plan to test fit the chassis and body more than once- it fits very tightly into the core support, and can bind and be ripped loose taking the body back off the chassis.

The front bumper tends to want to tip back a bit- tape it in place so that, when viewed from the side, the ends of the bumpers are even with the lower edge of the splash apron as the glue sets. This will prevent giving a downturned, ‘sad’ face look to the car when viewed from the front.

The decals are nicely printed, and set very well without aid of setting solution, but be very careful when placing them- they snug down good and fast, and don’t want to be moved once off the backer and on a painted or foiled surface.

Don’t forget to foil the window trim molded to the clear parts!

Yes- you can use the ‘foil before paint’ trick to detail the ‘Twin H Power’ lettering on the decklid… all you need is a polishing cloth or fine sandpaper… and a very soft, very steady hand.

The windshield almost snaps into place- the rear window unit can be a bit fiddly. Best course of action seems to be removing the mounting posts for it molded to the headliner, and then splitting the rear glass unit into its three components- backlight and rear quarter glass. The rear window seems easiest to install by slipping the bottom edge home, then gently working your way up, pushing the window until it seats into place.

The majority of the chrome parts fit well, but the front bumper tends to want to lean back if left unsecured while the glue sets, which will give the bumper a sad-face look when you look at the car from straight ahead. Tape the center of the bumper down as the glue sets, being mindful that the bumper is horizontal in front, and along both sides. Also, keep in mind you will likely need to open up the mounting holes for the side mirrors and wipers a bit to ensure they settle into place properly.

PROBLEMS:

We’ve all seen the kits with bad flash- not much can be done about that now, though Dave Metzner has said the manufacturing facility has been made aware of the problem, and told not to let it happen again. The ’52 convertible shows much better molding quality than the earlier ’53 Club Coupes.

The 1953 Club Coupe kits out now have bad air cleaner decals. A request with an SASE to Moebius will get you as many corrected sheets as you need. The other kits have corrected air cleaner decals.

The cut lines for the rear fender skirts are too far forward. This was corrected as of the ’52 convertible, and will be fixed on later reissues of the coupe kits. In the meantime, filling the existing vertical cut lines and moving the front one roughly 5mm rearward and the rear line about 3mm rearward is the best fix.

Watch out on the part number callouts for the side mirrors and wing vent glass- the part numbers are flip flopped side to side.

The instruction sheet is mostly pretty good, but some subassembly diagrams only show one side, leaving a bit of guesswork regarding parts location on the side not shown. That being said, it’s still difficult to put the wrong part in the wrong position because of the way the parts attach. There is a very helpful color guide, but no color callouts in the actual assembly sequence.

CUSTOM MODS:

In short- if you wish to lower rear of the car, be prepared for a lot of grinding. You will probably need to raise the transmission tunnel so the driveshaft will fit into the snout on the differential- you might also need to extend the tunnel all the way back to gain clearance for the differential snout. You will also need to modify or omit the upper piece of the rear crossmember which traps the driveshaft and exhaust system.

Lowering blocks can be made from simple slices of rectangular styrene strip, but depending on how low you go, you might want to look into de-arching or otherwise modifying/replacing the leaf springs and shocks, so as to gain ground clearance and not violate the ‘scrub line’.

Like most early IFS cars, bring the nose of the Hudson down too far and the front crossmember will be dangerously close to the ground- a thinner crossmember, mounted higher up in the frame, or a GM or Mustang II front clip will need to be adapted if you want the car to really hug the pavement.

The engine bay will gulp down pretty much anything short of a Cummins turbo diesel, but for most V8 swaps at the very least you will need to remove the mounting pins for the stock engine, and more than likely move the transmission crossmember rearward. To avoid possible interference with the V8’s left valve cover when installing the chassis into the body, you may need to trim the battery tray back a little bit depending on what V8 you use and how it is positioned in the chassis. Keep in mind- Hudsons were available with GM Hydramatic transmissions- so early GM overheads were common swap fodder for them, though again, pretty much anything is fair game. I’ve installed Cadillac, Pontiac, and even an AMC V8 into these kits, and all have required more or less the same modifications.

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Posted · Report post

Chuck, thanks so much for that writeup/summary. this is exactly the sort of thing that is very useful to other modelers. i am not going to build this kit anytime soon (but the race car remains a possibility) but i am going to print out your writeup and put it in the box with the kit for when the time comes to build it. its great to know beforehand the pitfalls and problems (even better with proven solutions!) and your writeup is perfect for that. thanks again for taking the time to write it up like that.

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Any thought as to when the corrected skirts will be made/next run?

Chuck- GREAT reviews. Thanks.

Charlie Larkin

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Any thought as to when the corrected skirts will be made/next run?

Chuck- GREAT reviews. Thanks.

Charlie Larkin

All I know is that it will be fixed on future reissues of the Club Coupes and NASCAR kits- you'd probably be better off asking Dave when those will be out. At the risk of being overly redundant, I'll mention again that they have been corrected on the '52 droptop kit. B)

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Posted · Report post

Thanks for this Chuck!

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Just an update- the most recent '53 Club Coupe I purchased (two weeks ago) has the fender skirt cut lines relocated. So it would appear any Hudson variants Moebius brings out from here on out will have the fender skirts properly centered over the rear wheels. B)

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Posted · Report post

Could someone explain what "bad flash" means? Never heard that term before.

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Could someone explain what "bad flash" means? Never heard that term before.

The early production run had kits with copious quantities of "flash," or excess plastic, and very heavy mold lines.

The coupe I have, which is pretty early-production, has a body with such heavy mold-lines that it's almost un-buildable without excessive sanding. That will be receiving a Motor City sedan conversion.

The rest of the kit, though, is very nice. And with the quality control corrected, I say it's a good kit.

Charlie Larkin

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Thanks, in that case my one must be from some mid-production era, because I compared it to my convertible body and the mold lines look exactly the same, but the fender skirt is still shifted. Is there a way how to identify the correct fender version just by information on the box?

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