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bigmikevee

Will Primer Seal or do I Need Separate Sealer?

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Hi Gang,

Starting to experiment with lacquer, thanks to all who have posted/replied before on this topic, but still not sure about primer vs. sealer. Do I need both? If I use a good primer, will sealer be necessary? If I use a good sealer, will I need a good primer? Is sealer sandable? Won't using both, even if lightly misted, obscure detail? If I use both use sealer first? Do I sand it, then prime, then sand again? Does it matter what type of paint goes on top? Man..... I think I'll just go buy diecasts..... :lol::lol:;):lol: PHEW!! Thanks.

Mike

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Mike, what I use is Duplicolor Primer/Sealer. It both seals and primes at the same time, obviously. You should be able to find it at auto parts stores that carry Duplicolor paints. It will be easy to spot, also, it say "Primer/Sealer" right on the can.

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Highway,

What would I do without you? Thanks, Matthew, you just don't know how much you are helping me be the modeler I always wanted. Between this and the other tips, it could just happen someday....if we all live long enough! :lol::lol:;):lol:

Mike

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Highway,

Couple quick questions.... do you sand between coats, do you decant or spray from can? Gotta try some tomorrow, been wanting to try hotter paints. Thanks again.

Mike

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I always happy to help when I can, Mike. :lol: I normally don't sand between any coats, just lazy I guess, :lol: but by reading Mark Taylor's "Back to Basics" thread, I think that's why I occasionally have a little orange peel. I would say from what I've picked up from his thread, and later seen on a couple of the TV car series, I would probably at least sand (or as Mark referred to it as, polish) the final coat of primer with a very fine grit. I also spray it right from the can, I have an airbrush, but I never use it! :lol: I've always had good luck with DupliColor paints, so I tend to stick with what works.

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I agree with you guys about Duplicolor being a good choice for primer as well as their rattle-can paints. I don't use a sealer myself, but that's just a personal choice, as I like the system I use. I hear others have real good success with a sealer, so I guess it's like " Bill Geary" says - PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE" - and then experiment a little too. I use Duplicolors gray "High-build primer" to start off, and then if it's a bright color I'm laying down, I go with Plasticotes white primer. Sands beautifully. I've never gotten Duplicolors white primer to work for me. Seems to stay gummy, and never really dries to a sandable hardness.

I like to let my primer set a least a few days to a week to get it good and dry. Sands beautifully and feathers out to a nice finish before the color goes on, and shows any last-minute unseen flaws needing to be fixed.

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Hey bigmike,

What are you trying to seal? The reason I am asking is because in my experience with covering "hot" plastic colors, no primer or sealer will keep the color from bleeding through *if* you are going to use clear coat. I have tried using high build primer followed by several coats of sealer followed by more primer only to have white paint turn pink once the clear coat is applied. I`ve found that several coats of silver after primer/sealer usually works best for color stability.

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Hey Hawk,

Thanks for your reply, still learning as I go. Want to try some other paints with my airbrush, rattle cans have been fun, but, you know.....

Hawk, on your reply, I didn't quite understand part of it. Was your initial plastic color red and you were trying to seal that? I thought once well-sealed the sealer and/or primer would do their job and any color could be sprayed. Did the clear turn red from the plastic color or a reaction to the primer/sealer? I also now know Plasticote makes different color primers, wouldn't it be smart to match the primer close to color I am going to paint? Maybe that is not important, but I just don't know. Trying to make sure I understand, I know a good modeler is going to experiment, but if I can save a couple steps and a couple bucks along the way, I'll take it!!

Thanks again for your help!

Mike

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Hi, Mike.

Occasionally, parts molded in red, yellow, orange, and some stronger shades of blue will have a tendency to "bleed." In other words, the dyes and colorants used to color the plastic will react to the paints and leech out. It's similar to putting colored clothes in with whites, everything turns funny colors.

Although I haven't tried this, several people I know have suggested the following solution for bleeder colors:

1. Spray a light, but thorough coat of primer.]

2. Coat it with a light, but thorough coat of a light silver paint. The bleeding action usually stops at the paint.

3. Spray one-two more coats of primer. Paint as usual.

As to primers, I've had nothing but trouble with Dupli-Color's primers, although their paints are okay. I generally use Plasti-Kote (avaialable at Car Quest, some Napas, and some independent stores,) or Valspar gray lacquer primer, available at the craft chains, and, again, probably some independent stores if you do a little searching.

I use sandable gray primer for 99% of my priming needs, as I find it does what I need well. Some people like to use white under lighter colors, or red oxide because exposed areas on older cars were primed with it, so it looks more correct. Black primer will darken the colors you put over it.

It's worth nothing that Plasti-Kote is owned by Valspar and the gray lacquer primer sold at Michael's (the one I use,) appears to be the same stuff as Plasti-Kote T235, but a little thinner, so it doesn't hide detail as much. It's also half the price. Best of all, it works beautifully.

Charlie Larkin

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Hey Charlie,

Thanks for the information, helped clear up a couple of things I did not quite understand. Like your analogy about mixing the laundry. Will try Michaels and see how it goes. You and Hawk gave me a lot of great insight, and I appreciate it. This is just the coolest forum in the world, and it has helped my enjoyment of our wonderful hobby, and I thank you once again.

Now to the store...

Mike

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