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Good Paint Gone Bad

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Posted · Report post

I am dipping my big toe back into the hobby after a twenty+years absence and this board has provided a wealth of knowledge.

My question is regarding bottled enamel paints. How long will they keep, on average, if they are unopened?

Please don't reply "try lacquer instead." :D

Thank you,

Mike

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Posted · Report post

i'll second what Mr. Taylor said. i just ran across some old bottles of Testors enamel from when I was a kid in the 70's, at my Mother's house . all the new bottles were still good and the open ones, not so much.

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Posted · Report post

I'd say, use the old paint for parts and stuff if they are in pretty good shape but if you are painting a body, get yourself new paints, ALWAYS!! ;)

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Posted · Report post

Gotta try them....may need a drop or two of thinner...I just found some floquil paints....15 years old....I did store them upside down, a couple of drops of Dio Sol...good as new.

That said....switch to lacquers.....You will be happier ;)

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Posted · Report post

I bought some old used Model Master paint from my lhs. It was open but was still good. It was older paint.

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Posted · Report post

I've had 30-year old paint in better shape than six-month old paint.

One thing that does help is storing the bottles inverted. That helps keep the air out.

Make sure your bottles seal tightly, consider adding a drop or two of lacquer thinner to the enamels. It's stronger and seems to help keep the enamels from drying out as quickly. Leave the little cardboard thingie in, too, as that does make a difference.

Charlie Larkin

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Posted · Report post

Thank you for your replies... I kinda thought that would be the case.

What actually constitutes "bad" enamel? What will it do, or not do?

The reason for all of this is that I really like some of the colors by boyd paints and they are obviously no longer made, so I'm stuck buying old store stock.

Mike

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Posted · Report post

You'll know when it has gone bad... If it hasn't gone hard, it might be in a gel state. Once there, it is very rare to rejuvenate it even with lacquer thinner. Often they will separate and get thick and usually that is the last step before the point of no return. If you find one in that state, add lacquer thinner and mix thoroughly.

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Posted · Report post

Mike ,

Enamel will develop a crystal like texture after a period of time . You will never see it until it's sprayed through an airbrush The surface of the model will appear to have sand mixed in with the paint. When this occurs , take the body straight to the dipping tank , you will never be able to sand it smooth.

The enamels , as a rule , have a nice long shelf life . You can get around the crystal problem by simply straining the paint before shooting if you are aware of the paints age . I always encourage buying paint from a hobby shop with a faster turnover , it's a good way to avoid the problem entirely.

As for the age old battle , I prefer the enamels any day , if not for any other reason......It allows me to do battle with Mikey Mc on occasion ! :lol:

Donn Yost

Lone Wolf Custom Painting

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