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Building and Evaluating the TDR 6.l Liter Hemi


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I've had a Willys Woody project on my mind for a while. So, after cutting up an 8th scale coupe body and mocking up the wooden house I've come up with this concept.

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At the same time, TDR Innovations has been kind enough to send me one of their 8th scale 6 Liter SRT Hemi engine kits. They have asked me to build and evaluate the kit and when its done it will go in my Willys Woody.

TDR is well known for taking care when packaging their products. My engine arrived via Priority Post and was well packaged in foam chips.

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The parts are wrapped in bubble wrap at source.

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Edited by arick
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When unwrapping the bubble wrap packages, its important to be CAREFULL. If one were to rip open the bubble wrap packaging, the results could be catastrophic with lots of broken parts. I suggest you use a razor blade or Exacto knife to cut the scotch tape and then unroll the bubble wrap and carefully remove the parts.

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After unwrapping the parts and laying them out, the next thing I looked for was an instruction sheet, and there wasn't one. I then went to the TDR web site and found a photo of the assembled kit, but unlike the other TDR engine kits, there was no assembly instructions on the site. This won't be problematic for the experienced builder but it may un-nerve the novice crowd. This is something that TDR needs to deal with and the simple solution is adding assembly images to the web site as they have done with their other engines. Not a big deal but TDR needs to take note.

Edited by arick
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After laying out the parts, the first thing that grabbed my attention was the headers. WOW WOW WOW!!

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The headers that come with this kit are not stock, they are block hugger style and man are they cool. This header set is a model builders dream. Just for fun, I test fitted them to a TDR big block Chev and a 392 Hemi and with very minor adjustments they work well. Unfortunatly they won't work on the small block Chev.

TDR needs to give serious thought to including these headers with all their engine kits. And, for the purists, especially those that may want to put this engine in that Cuda we keep hearing about, perhaps a set of stock headers should also be included. Never the less, these are the coolest kit headers I've ever seen and the good guys at TDR deserve a pat on the backside for creating them.

Edited by arick
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TDR is known for their accurate and high quality parts. All their products are CAD designed and manufactured using the Rapid Prototype process. For those of you who are unfamiliar with this process, Google it.

The RP process produces a product that, unlike resin, is brittle and some of the smaller and thinner pieces can be subject to breakage. However, the good thing is that if a part breaks, the break is clean and easily repaired. And, unlike resin, these parts are not subject to warpage. Probably the most troubling issue with RP parts is the surface "layering" during the manufacturing process which leaves a bit of a rough surface. Don't let this worry you, a bit of sanding and a hit with some high build primer easily removes any surface issues. If you don't wish to take on the smoothing process, the extreemly high quality of the product more than makes up for any surface issues.

As I mentioned previously, the headers included in this kit are a model builders dream come true.

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I couldn't wait to see how they looked with a bit of clean up so after just a few minutes of smoothing with sandpaper and a small file I hit them with some high build primer. They are now ready for wet sanding and a coat of paint or some chrome.

A word of caution when drilling bolt, or in this case, flange bolt holes. As I mentioned previously, thin RP produced products can be a bit brittle so use caution when drilling holes. I always drill a pilot hole first and use very little pressure on the drill. Don't use a power drill.

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TDR is known for their accurate and high quality parts. All their products are CAD designed and manufactured using the Rapid Prototype process. For those of you who are unfamiliar with this process, Google it.

The RP process produces a product that, unlike resin, is brittle and some of the smaller and thinner pieces can be subject to breakage. However, the good thing is that if a part breaks, the break is clean and easily repaired. And, unlike resin, these parts are not subject to warpage. Probably the most troubling issue with RP parts is the surface "layering" during the manufacturing process which leaves a bit of a rough surface. Don't let this worry you, a bit of sanding and a hit with some high build primer easily removes any surface issues. If you don't wish to take on the smoothing process, the extreemly high quality of the product more than makes up for any surface issues.

As I mentioned previously, the headers included in this kit are a model builders dream come true.

021.jpg

I couldn't wait to see how they looked with a bit of clean up so after just a few minutes of smoothing with sandpaper and a small file I hit them with some high build primer. They are now ready for wet sanding and a coat of paint or some chrome.

A word of caution when drilling bolt, or in this case, flange bolt holes. As I mentioned previously, thin RP produced products can be a bit brittle so use caution when drilling holes. I always drill a pilot hole first and use very little pressure on the drill. Don't use a power drill.

###### the headers look so real

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Here's a couple pics of the "real" engine that Rick is working with.....rather than go with a traditional "old school" engine he's taking a different approach by using a modern power plant in his Woody.

That seems to be the trend with today's Hot Rods.

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Of course if you're feeling lazy you could always cover the whole thing with a piece of plastic like the factory does and call it sound deadening.......LOL.

A61hemi-engine.jpg

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Its time to start smoothing some of the large parts of this kit, starting with the oil pan.

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The first thing I did was drill out the bolt holes around the lip of the pan. In retrospect, I should have waited until I was finished sanding. The reason for this is because drilling the holes weakens the lip and it could break when handled during sanding.

TDR products are known for their accuracy and this piece is no exception. Its produced with all the braces and hard to get at areas. However, RP process leaves a slightly rough and layered surface that is hard to get at in small confined spaces. TDR asked that I not use power tools when smoothing parts from this kit. So, with sandpaper in hand, and wrapped around toothpicks and round wooden dowls, I went to work sanding the pan. When done, I shot it with high build primer and found a couple of spots that needed some more work. A bit more sanding and another coat of high build and the pan is now ready for wet sanding and paint.

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A word of caution. When working in confined spaces where sanding dust is an issue, I highly recommend the use of surgical gloves and eye, nose and throat protection. Its always best to be safe.

Edited by arick
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