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Back after many many years

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Hello all, just a few newbie questions..

I have been out of the game for quite some time and alot has changed. I have searched the forums for my answers, but no luck!

I am just looking for some recommendations for paint and putty. Are the small Testor bottles still a decent paint to use? They seem to be more of a "starter" paint these days. I am also looking for a putty that might be easier to work with for someone with no experience. And maybe a putty that does not smell too bad.

I ahve many more questions, but just wanted to started with these two.

Thanks for Reading and hopefully someone can shed some light for me

Don.

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Don, welcome back to this great hobby. Get ready to feel like a kid again! LOL. My advice is to start with a simple rattle can paint system that's going to bring you good results. Got with Tamiya rattle cans. They have a good variety of colors, etc . . .stay within the same paint system until you get the rhythm of the spraying again, and then you'll be ready to move on from there.

Stick around, this is a fun and inspirational place to hang out in . . . and don't be afraid to ask more questions and also show us your work in progress. You'll be back looking like a teenager in not time.

Best wishes and happy styrene journeys.

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Hi Don and Welcome! :)

I'll try to put my 2¢ here...............yes, those small Testors bottles are just that-----for starters. I personally don't care for them as they take FOREVER to dry, and the paints just aren't durable enough for me for the kind of handling l may need to do in the building process. If you have a dehydrator, that helps alot as far as drying time-------but to dry on their own is a long wait. I NEVER use them for painting bodies! I use mostly automotive paints, but that's a subject for another time.

Better to use some of the Tamiya acrylics that are out there for detailing, or some of the other brand water based acrylics which dry reasonably well and clean up great with water. For painting bodies, I recommend Tamiya Sprays------a bit expensive but very forgiving and easy to use for a beginner like yourself.

As far as putties, I personally don't know of a brand that isn't going to wrinkle your nose with the fumes. I mostly like the two part putties that the body shop guys use such as Evercoat, or my personal favorite, Dynatron Putty-Cote. These both feather edge beautifully and the Dynatron is great as it has a bit of plastic in it..............great for body work where you have to add styrene trim.

I'm sure others will post as to what they recommend..................hope this helps! ;)

Edited by MrObsessive

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For putty, I'd recommend 2 part auto body putty. This will not shrink and cures fast. The one part putty shrinks over time but I still use it for small, thin, quick uses. Bondo is fine and other brands too. Glazing putty is the type most use.

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Same answer for putty.

I switched from rattle cans to an airbrush last year and love it. The Tamiya rattle cans were great but getting too expensive. Testor's lacquer were very nice.

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Evercoat here,too! Plus I like to used PlastiKote sandable primer too. It also fills small scratches. I STILL use Testors enanel paints for deatail painting, but i also have a dehydrator that REALLY cuts the drying time and helps it to harden tougher. Welcome back Don, your gonna find that ALOT has changed, but it's for the best, caz now your models can come out even BETTER! ;):);)

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Thank you very much for the quick repsonses..

Just need a little clear up for part painting. Go with acrylics versus enamels? Besides acrylics cleaning up with water, is there any other noticable difference?

Thanks again for the help/

Don.

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Acrylics clean up well with water when wet. However if you mess up a paint job, Windex (or any ammonia based product) will clean it up as well especially after it's dry. Water based acrylics shine up just as well as enamels..........they just don't have the horrendously long drying times that enamels have.

If you get the Tamiya acrylics, you'll want to use their thinner, as it can be a bit thick out of the jar. Some have suggested using isopropyl alcohol, but in my experience, I've always found this can lead to fisheyes--------------not a good thing!

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Mark I could have swore I have the same Bondo brand putty from Wally world but it didnt come with and kind of hardner, do they by chance make two different kinds and I picked up the wrong kind needed for modeling? I have tried the kind I bought and to me its really crappy and dont smooth out correctly, maybe I just need to throw a touch of hardner in it and try it again?

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Thanks for your help Mark, you are exactly right, I just put up my airbrushes after bringing them in the house for a good cleaning and I checked to see which one I have and I bought the wrong thing. Its no wonder Im having so many issues with cracking and not sanding smooth. I guess I will chunk what I have and buy the two part putty.

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If you want a real simple putty to use try Tamiya White, very smooth, dries quickly, easy to sand but dries quite hard. Many modelers are recommending the two part auto putties but for a beginner you can't go wrong with Tamiya products.

The same goes for paint, I swear by Tamiya. Their rattle can lacquer paint sprays very nicely from the can or is easily decanted and sprayed through the airbrush. Their acrylic bottle line can be thinned with Tamiya thinner for airbrushing or brushed on. It covers well either way. Most of us use Alclad if we need to create a chrome finish and I'm a fan of Model Master Metallizers for a lot of my steel, aluminum or other metallic finishes. I also swear by Tamiya White Primer as my undercoat for all painting but others prefer duplicolor or Krylon Primers which are also cheaper.

rob

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Evercoat here. and i thought the smell was half the fun! :lol::P

I think you have putty confused with flatulence! :lol:

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I think you have putty confused with flatulence! :lol:

Confusciuos says: Eat No Beans Before Building :lol:

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here's a tip....that bondo glazing and spot putty is designed to go on top of primer it's designed to work with and bond to primer ,, not raw plastic.

It might work ok but thats not how it's meant to work. I use the non hardener type exclusively, as intended<< and have never had any issues with it in 8 yrs.

On putties, definately go with a two part putty over a one part. No matter which you choose, it is going to have an odor.

Do not waste your money on Evercoat!!!!! Don't get me wrong, it is the best two part putty on the market for autos, but it is also the most expensive. I used it for many years doing bodywork on 1/1 cars & trucks in my job, & agree it is superb, but it's really not worth the money for using on models. You run the risk of it going bad before you can use it all, no matter how tightly you seal it, & at an average of $40 a can, that's an expensive loss. I know, it's gone bad on me before

Here's what I'ved used on models for a few years now & recommend without hesitation, Bondo two part Professional Glazing & Spot Putty:

100_0179.jpg

It's nearly as finely grained as Evercoat is, so it sands & feathers out just as easily. At $7 a tube, it's also cheaper, & depending on how much bodywork you do, a tube will last at least a year or longer.

Make sure you get the one marked "Professional Glazing & Spot Putty", as it is a two part putty & will have the small tube of hardener in the package with it. Most any auto parts store will carry it, & some WalMarts do as well, in their automotive section.

Take it from someone with several years real life experience with Evercoat, for models, it's really not worth the money.

As to any one part putty, I don't recommend any of those. They are basically thickened lacquer primer, thus they dry by solvent evaporation, so you run the risk if it shrinking even after you complete the model. I've also had the one part putties attack the plastic before, due to the lacquer content.

Here's a couple of photos of the two part Bondo I use before & after sanding;

Before:

100_0158-1.jpg

After:

100_0155-1.jpg

:unsure:

Edited by scalenut

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as is the case with paint, with filler putty you can hardly go wrong with Tamiya. especially since its a one-part so you dont have the mixing to contend with. they make at least two different grades and both are great, dont seem to sink, dry fast and sand smooth. both tamiya and fellow japanese company gunze sangyo also make different grade surfacers that are sort of on the micro level and fill very fine scratches.

most prices on these items are, however, decidedly not on the micro level. but you really do get a superior product for your money in most cases.

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as is the case with paint, with filler putty you can hardly go wrong with Tamiya. especially since its a one-part so you dont have the mixing to contend with. they make at least two different grades and both are great, dont seem to sink, dry fast and sand smooth. both tamiya and fellow japanese company gunze sangyo also make different grade surfacers that are sort of on the micro level and fill very fine scratches.

most prices on these items are, however, decidedly not on the micro level. but you really do get a superior product for your money in most cases.

true .and with thebondo spot putty.... if it sinks , cracks ..ect... your putting too much on at one time ,, it's designed to fill pinholes and hairline cracks.after priming and sanding. for larger jobs it takes more layers to work properly.(or a more suitable product) If all else fails don't knock a product before you read the instructions.(Not directed at jbwelda,, just continuation of his advice)

Edited by scalenut

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