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Seeing that I dont really know much about cars, can someone direct me to a correct explanation of what a 4 Link is? Is it a common component or something only found on race cars. I know,I think, It has to do with suspension. Are there any tutorials around on how to build one, or modify whats supplied in the kit?

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It's a type of suspension, and can be found in street cars, race cars, and truck. The term comes from how the suspension is configured, meaning it has 4 "links" connecting the axle to the frame. This type suspension usually has either coil springs or air bags, sometimes a combination of the two.

The simplest type of 4 link will have 4 control arms (links), 2 upper and 2 lower, connecting from the frame paralell to each other. It's more or less a modified trailing arm suspension, the additional links/pivot points allow for smoother operation as well as wheel location. While good for suspension travel and simplicity, it isn't best for controlling lateral (side to side) movement of the axle. Those types usually also have an extra bar called a Panhard rod. Those are usually referred to as a 5 link. You see these mostly on vehicle like the late Tahoe/Suburban, the solid axle coil spring Jeeps, Dodge trucks, and Super Duty Fords also use this type in the front.

A better version is the triangulated 4 link, which sets the control arms at opposing angles to each other, usually with the lowers angling towards the wheels, uppers angling in. This compensates for the lateral motion, and is superior for handling. This type is found under many vehicles, such as the GM full and intermediate RWD cars from the late '50s to the mid '90s. Ford also used this suspension for many years under the Crown Victoria.

As far as building one, I suppose it would depend on what kit you're working with. Scratching one shouldn't be too hard, again, depending on what you're after. Making the control arms can be as simple as using round stock (for a racing/custom) to make the control arms, and adding coul springs of your choice. If you really want to get into the details, adding scale Heim joints at the ends would add to a custom or race type.

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Each side of the axle has 2 bars, or "links" that are roughly parallel to the frame.

GMGMCPICKUPDIRECTREPLACEMENT14-vi.jpg

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Pretty much any Pro-Stock,Pro-Mod or Top Sportsman model put out by Revell will have a 4-Link rear suspension, check out any of the builds by Tyrone Price, Wayne Stevens Jr., Clay Kemp & others, as I said if it's a P/S, P/M or T/S, it'll have a 4-Link, that way you will have a idea of what to do to build one.

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Each side of the axle has 2 bars, or "links" that are roughly parallel to the frame.

GMGMCPICKUPDIRECTREPLACEMENT14-vi.jpg

if you install one though make sure tighten the nut that holds the coilspring in place :D

on a unrelated note, what is the little arm connected to the top of the axle....is that a panhard rod or is this something else?

a good place to find this setup is in the 71 pro street superbee kit and i think there are a few resin casters out there aswell who offer something similar

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Rings & Things sells bead necklace ends (necklace people glue the rubber necklace material into the end) that can easily pass for rod ends for a 4 link suspension. Hobby Lobby and/or Michaels might have them but I haven't spotted them there yet.

Thanks to DanielG for the tip and a few pieces. I posted pics of my gold '40 Ford using the necklace ends.

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