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Thinning Testors Model Master paint.

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Posted · Report post

What should I use to thin the Testors Model Master paints for airbrushing?

One paint states you can use water to clean and the other does not. Can I use laquer thinner to thin both? Thanks.

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Posted · Report post

Model Master paints are available in acrylics, enamels and lacquers. Use the appropriate thinner for each, no "mixing and matching."

The paint that says on the label that you can clean up with water is acrylic. Obviously if you can clean up with water, you can also thin the paint with water.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

My experience is that good old hardware store lacquer thinner _ the Swiss Army knife of solvents _ is the best product to use to thin Testors lacquers and enamels for airbrushing. In fact, I don't think there's a whole lot of difference chemically between lacquer thinner and the solvent Testors markets as "airbrush thinner." The major difference is price ... a small tin of airbrush thinner costs about the same as much larger can of lacquer thinner from Wally World.

Model Master acrylics can, indeed, be thinned with water, but, for quicker drying times, I would recommend a water/rubbing alcohol mix (do NOT use 91 percent alcohol!) or the acrylic paint thinner marketed by Testors.

Regardless of the thinner or the type of paint, making sure the paint is the proper consistency for airbrushing is key. The rule of thumb ... thin it to approximately the consistency of milk.

I agree with Ken on the lacquer thinner part, I tried for the first time a few years ago with testors colors by boyd enamels and was pleasantly surprised with the results. I have found, though, that for the least "hot" to plastics is pactra's rc paint lacquer thinner, it's a little costlier than the base stuff, but in my experience it works great where others craze the plastic. I've been using it for years and since switching i've yet to etch or craze a body with it.

Gray

btw, Ken your package will be mailed soon, sorry for the delay

Edited by Gray Smith

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Posted · Report post

Yep, good ole Lacquer thinner... Yes for Lacquer and Enamel, but I like it in my Acrylics too!

Just do not return the Lacquer mixed with Acrylic back to the bottle, it will glob up and go bad in a day or so. But I like the way it sprays and it dries even quicker. I have no problem pouring Laquer mixed Enamels back into the bottles and them lasting long term.

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Posted · Report post

To be clear, I am referring to using lacquer thinner in the water clean up variety (aqueous) of acrylics.

Of course it also works well with decanted Krylon, Rustoleum, Plasticote...

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Posted · Report post

And, just to add to the confusion, you also have your acrylic enamel paints, e.g. Krylon, Rustoleum, etc., and acrylic lacquers, both of which are solvent-based ... B)

As I understand, the term "acyrlic," as it applies to paint, simply means the product is infused with a plastic-like component, which makes it dry harder.

I believe the proper term for the water-based hobby paints we're familiar with, e.g. Tamiya, Model Master, some Gunze, would be "aqueous acrylics."

It is confusing. Paint basically consists of three parts, solvent, resin, and binder. The most common resins used today are acrylic and urethane. The most common solvents are lacquer thinner, mineral spirits, and water. These can be combined in lots of different ways. The labeling is what makes it difficult. You can have "acrylic enamel": acrylic resin mixed with water, or "acrylic enamel": acrylic resin mixed with lacquer thinner, two very different animals. Neither one has any relation to traditional enamel, i.e. alkyd or gum resin mixed with mineral spirits.

At least it's simple in one respect, based on the previous comments, it seems that lacquer thinner will work on all of them.

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Posted · Report post

Hey George,

If you are using Testors acrylic paint try windshield-washer fluid, the blue stuff in the gallon jug. I can't remember who on the forums told me to try it for thinning (sorry), but it works great on acrylics. Since acrylics dry so fast, you can also dip a q-tip in the fluid then use for a quick wipe if they clog your airbrush tip. Use about 60% paint and 40% washer fluid, works like a charm. I really like acrylics, one you get used to them, they are very nice. Good luck, hope I helped a little bit.

Mike

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Posted · Report post

Thanks for the advice. I used the laquer thinner and it worked great. I used the laquer thinner from Home Depot. Paint laid down excellant.

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