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Harbor Freight Score


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Yeah, it's got that little button on the bottom for letting all the collected "juices" out :lol: Our air compressor has this deal where it puts a tiny bit of oil in the air, so I needed a really good trap.

So, I'm gonna do some painting after work tomorrow. I'll try to post pics :D

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I thought breathing the fumes from the glue and gold paint was half the fun LOL - just kidding kids this stuff is VERY harmful to your helth - allways be in a well ventaleted area youll be thankful when you get older - espically when useing supper glues or grinding resin.happy modeling mike.

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Andy, you don't need to wear those respirators. As long as you're not planning on breathing past age 50.

I worked several years in the auto body trade, in my youth. I am paying for not taking my lungs seriously.

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10-4 ON WHAT DR. CRANKY SAID ABOUT THE LUNGS..I'VE BEEN USING A 10 LB. CO2 TANK FOR YEARS W / A REGULATOR & NO NEED FOR A MOISTURE TRAP..NEVER HAD A BAD SHOOT WITH THIS SET-UP, AND NO NOISE..I CAN GET 4-500 PAINT JOBS OUT OF 1 TANK FOR A $17.00 RE-FILL..JUST MY 2 CENTS, IT'S ALL MY MOMMY WILL LET ME SPEND THIS WEEK..

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Never knew it was that serious. Thanks everyone, will have to find the respirator..

I work for NAPA and this quarter they have a 3M respirator on sale for about $18.00 and combined with proper ventilation in your paint area it should be sufficient to protect your lungs. While the sale price is only a couple of bucks off the regular price, as others have noted it is well worth the price if you plan to live a long, healthy life.

They also have some good latex gloves on sale as well and while everyone is concerned about breathing the fumes, the chemicals that are absorbed through the skin can be just as harmful as the airborne fumes. I suggest using gloves if you are mixing paint, especially lacquers, enamels or automotive grade paint.

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I work for NAPA and this quarter they have a 3M respirator on sale for about $18.00 and combined with proper ventilation in your paint area it should be sufficient to protect your lungs. While the sale price is only a couple of bucks off the regular price, as others have noted it is well worth the price if you plan to live a long, healthy life.

They also have some good latex gloves on sale as well and while everyone is concerned about breathing the fumes, the chemicals that are absorbed through the skin can be just as harmful as the airborne fumes. I suggest using gloves if you are mixing paint, especially lacquers, enamels or automotive grade paint.

NAPA is where I picked up my repirator..great quality, for a reasonable price. Great paint selections as well. They mix up anything I want for the same price as a can of Tamiya.

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Never knew it was that serious. Thanks everyone, will have to find the respirator..

Good move to do. When I was younger I would emerge from the basement and blow my nose after a painting session, and it looked like a rainbow. The latex, and good old fashioned rubber gloves come in handy also. I would also recommend getting a shop apron of sorts.

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Yeah, it's got that little button on the bottom for letting all the collected "juices" out :lol: Our air compressor has this deal where it puts a tiny bit of oil in the air, so I needed a really good trap.

So, I'm gonna do some painting after work tomorrow. I'll try to post pics :D

As far as the trap goes, you may want to look into an inline filter as well to put on your main compressor line right before your airbrush hose. I get them for my Eastwood powfercoating gun. Little black ding dong looking guys, just because you say your compressor has an oiler....doesn't mix with paint real well. You might give them a shot. They will last for quite a wile on an air brush, and really aren't to spendy

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Never knew it was that serious. Thanks everyone, will have to find the respirator..

PLEASE Andy do this! I lost a dear friend 2 years ago to silicosis from many years of breathing brick & block saw dust. He was only 56. You only get one set of lungs, respect & care for them!
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harbor freight has paint masks with replaceable cartridges,,, and latex/vinyl/nitrile gloves.

I prefer the blue nitrile gloves, urethanes ,epoxys,and certain thinners will penetrate the latex ones

Oh yeah, gloves are a very good point too.... Anything to keep that stuff out of your body. Even if your not doing a ton of this stuff right now, or even using the really toxic products, it will help build good habits for latter on down the road. Someone else mentioned on a different threat I think, but put your carriage mask in a sealed bag when your not using it. A good cartridge will soak up ANY contaminants in the air paint or not, by the time you go to use it the next time it could be "full" and not able to protect you properly.

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Thank everyone :D

Well I did some painting, had some problems at first but I got them sorted. Any tips on how to make mixing it easier?

What are you shooting? I use clear plastic bottles from the make up isle, they have a spout on them. Most of my stuff is auto air so I mix and shake in them then squirt it into my fixed cup gravity feed. The little dixie cups for water fountains and pop cycle sticks work good for small amounts too.

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Well, it depends. I first started out using Enamel Latex (my dad said I should use it, but I said the latex wouldn't work with the thinner, sure enough it didn't :lol: ), but then when I thinned some Model Master enamel it was fine. I just need to get like some really small measuring spoons or something..

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If your mixing in the color cup , get some of the plastic pipettes.

than you can kinda rough count drops of thinner.

if your using a siphon feed ,it's hard to beat the little plastic bottles for mixing and you can store the extra in case you need it for touch up

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Way back in the dark ages, I was painting a 1:1 car in a room w/ no ventilation, and my respirator was probably loose. I nearly passed out toward the end of the third coat of DuPont Centari Enamel. I literally crawled outside on all fours, spitting up the color of the day from my lungs. Fortunately, I had no adverse reactions. Also, I had no adverse reactions. :wacko:

Paint is not the only enemy to your health in this hobby. Every time you sand, you are breathing in tiny particles. The resin dust is even worse, from what I have been told. A dust mask is a must in these situations. When using a moto tool on resin parts, I mocked up this square-mouthed funnel to my shop vac. I did add a piece of window screen inside the funnel to catch anything I may drop.

DSC00004-vi.jpg

Edited by Jon Cole
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