Nick Winter Automotive

33 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

First off, I have permission to use Brad's sketch, infact Brad came up with the shop logo.

Second, it's not perfect.

GEDC1504.jpg

GEDC1607.jpg

GEDC1609.jpg

GEDC1610.jpg

GEDC1600.jpg

Nick

Edited by Nick Winter

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Posted · Report post

Nick, with out wanting to provoke a fight , I must ask why you chose to place a window at such an extreme hight . Doorways are generally 7ft . Most repair shops have a 12ft ceiling , maybe 14. Overall, the building looks fine . The rectangle window placed at the hight you placed it at just dosen't "square" with accepted building practices . Ed Shaver

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Posted · Report post

Ed in all honesty every industrial.commercial building I have seen has the windows up high and away from the ground, so that's why I did it this way.

Nick

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Posted · Report post

Looks awesome so far Nick!

Manny

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Posted · Report post

I like the look .. finally a modern auto center. :)

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Posted · Report post

Are you going to do anything to cover the corregated holes in the window & door frames, Nick? Looks pretty good so far. Windows up high make sense to me - better security from burglars and allows natural light to the shop interior.

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You're off to a good start, Nick. Might I suggest that you frame in your windows and doors with styrene channel instead of angle. That way you get trim on both the inside and outside as well as covering up the holes in the walls.

Thanks

Carl

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the windows in our shop at VW were a good 12 feet or more off the pavement/ground, for security. i do see where Ed would find this questionable if the shop were a converted service station; they were all about high-visibility for advertising media and product placement like oil can racks, wiper blades, all that equipment. change out the strip styrene door and window frame for channel, and see if you can cover the inside surface to block the translucency of the plastic material somewhat. looking like a good start and i like the parking lot as well.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Carl hit the nail on the head Jim, that's exactly what I plan to do.

Nick

Thanks everyone.

Edit: forgot to mention I went back and cleaned up where the paint bled under the tape on the trim.

Edited by Nick Winter

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Posted (edited) · Report post

the windows in our shop at VW were a good 12 feet or more off the pavement/ground, for security. i do see where Ed would find this questionable if the shop were a converted service station; they were all about high-visibility for advertising media and product placement like oil can racks, wiper blades, all that equipment. change out the strip styrene door and window frame for channel, and see if you can cover the inside surface to block the translucency of the plastic material somewhat. looking like a good start and i like the parking lot as well.

Around here, none of the recently built auto repair shops (say, within the last 30 years), inclusing the one I work at, have any windows in the shop area. The only windows are in the doors, and perhaps the office/customer waiting areas. However, many of the older shops have widows exactly as Ed describes.

As Ed said, I'm not wanting to start any arguments, only giving a point of veiw from my own experiences being around the auto repair business. I'm sure that different areas will have different building codes and styles.

Edited by Longbox55

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Posted · Report post

Nick, with out wanting to provoke a fight , I must ask why you chose to place a window at such an extreme hight . Doorways are generally 7ft . Most repair shops have a 12ft ceiling , maybe 14. Overall, the building looks fine . The rectangle window placed at the hight you placed it at just dosen't "square" with accepted building practices . Ed Shaver

Ed in all honesty every industrial.commercial building I have seen has the windows up high and away from the ground, so that's why I did it this way.

Nick

The Baltimore GM plant I worked in had windows high, and even some fold-open windows in the ceiling......they were great for allowing natural light in. I worked both first AND seconds shifts in that plant, and I can tell you, the natural light during the day was a pleasant bonus.

Mike

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Posted · Report post

Some days , I jus come off being da "Heavy "................................................... I dunno. Ed Shaver

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Posted · Report post

nahhhh.... we loves ya.

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Posted · Report post

Great start Nick! Looking forward to watching this one develop......

Tony

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Posted · Report post

Great start Nick !!

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Posted · Report post

looking good there Nick, should make for a great display piece.

I work for NAPA, and we would love to have more nice and clean appearing shops in the Auto Care program, make sure you do this one proud!

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Posted · Report post

Mike, the Shop I work for is part of the Auto Care program, sorta why I chose to put that signage on.

Nick

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As far as covering up the holes in the walls, I'd say frame the doors and windows the way they are in real life. You can use basswood strips... easy to cut, easy to glue. Run a frame around the opening using a strip that's the same width as the thickness of the walls, then add the inside and outside moldings using slightly smaller strips. Just take a look at how a real door is framed.

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Posted · Report post

Looks really good so far Nick. I see you are using your decals, very cool. And just FYI, I worked in a shop here in Annapolis , MD. where the windows were pretty high off the ground. Great for natural light during the day.

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Hmmmm been a while since I worked on this one...................I'll get it done eventually, my way of course.

JB Welded the building down to the base:

GEDC3862.jpg

Also made up a few displays and such.

GEDC3836.jpg

GEDC3841.jpg

GEDC3842.jpg

More to come.

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Posted · Report post

nice start. how did you do the parking lot pavement?

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Posted · Report post

Progressing nicely Nick. Keep at it.

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Posted · Report post

nice start. how did you do the parking lot pavement?

Thanks, Base is made of Hard-Board or some the building centers call it, I sprayed it with black primer then lightly sanded with 2000 grit.

Progressing nicely Nick. Keep at it.

Thanks Brad.

Nick

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Posted · Report post

Looks good Nick and so what if it's not perfect, all that matters is that you have FUN building it.

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Posted · Report post

Sure am Nick, this Diorama's are FUN for sure.

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