Black Chrome BMF...

22 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

BMF07.jpg

That Stuff....

How Glossy is it? Is it like Gloss Black, SemiGloss, or Matt? I need to make matt black window trims for one build, and I'd like to know if that stuff works for it.

If it don't work, is there any other stuff to make matt black window trim? Of course I can paint the trim, but masking is not a little thing... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I havent personally used it, but the pack at my LHS looked really reflective and shiny kind of like a darker version of chrome. I would suggest using a black sharpie marker or a testors paint marker for black window trim, both methods have worked well for me in the past.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I agree with the sharpie idea,Just two or three passes over the trim and it will look like weather striping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I have used it but didn't like it that much. It was shiny but seemed to be thicker than the normal BMF.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

It has a somewhat glossy finish- but I'd reccomend against using it because it does not stick very well, and seems more prone to tearing than plain BMF.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Thanks guys!

So needs to pick up one Black Sharpie Marker, a good one. I guess I will do some masking anyway, because it wouldn't be the first time when I mess the paint job when painting window trims.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Niko,

Just my two cents... Take the extra time, mask the trim with regular BMF or Tamiya tape, and airbrush a few light coats of your favorite trim color. I like Testors Rubber, but you can pick any color you wish. The final resullt is well worth the trouble. :D

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

That would be a good way too, since if those trims are painted by airbrush, thet look much better (and cleaner!) than i they would have been painted by brush. Thanks for the idea, David, I'll give it a try. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

What is the secret to good crisp window trim? I am trying to do the black window trim on my AE86 project and I can't get it to look right. I have tried a black Sharpie but it doesn't go on Laquer very well. I have also tried brush painting it but there is still some bleeding even if I mask with Tamiya tape. I have seen some really good window trim on this site...so is there a better way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

mask using your normal tape...

spray 1 coat of clear.. ( the clear will run under the tape but then seals the tape )

wait for the clear to cure completely..

then paint your color...

hope this helps

Wow...never thought of that, I'll give that a try...thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

On colored plastic... using Model Master Laquer so I'll just spray Model Master Laquer Clear first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Use the Black Bare Metal Foil, then scuff lightly and paint with thinned Model Master Black Chrome Trim paint. If you burnish the BMF down carefully, but leave the burr on the "cut" edge of the trim piece intact (don't burnish it down), the burr will help keep the paint on the BMF. You do need to move semi-quickly, so that you keep a wet edge and don't lift the dried areas as you're applying "new" paint.

The Black BMF straight off the sheet looks too shiny IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Anyone know how to achieve this? Before I go on here is what I don't have, Bmf, and alclad. Should I just do a gloss black to achieve this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I think the only way to get even close is BMF black chrome, which IS available. bare-metal-foil-black-chrome.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

if the part that you are wanting to be black chrome is already a chrome piece, you could try airbrushing Tamiya Smoke very lightly over the piece until you get the look you're after.

otherwise, I'd go with Bill's suggestion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Anyone know how to achieve this? Before I go on here is what I don't have, Bmf, and alclad. Should I just do a gloss black to achieve this?

This might be easier to answer if you told us what you were trying to accomplish. For example, Bill's suggestion would probably be great for most things, but wouldn't be as practical for something like changing the color on a set of multi-spoke wheels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I've noticed several people stating that they use a Sharpie to draw on the black trim around windows of vehicles. I have done the same thing because it is easier than masking off areas and painting. The permanency of the ink has been an issue with me so I did a test. I used a scrap piece of stiff coated paper and put down a blob of black Sharpie as dark as I could get it, a blob of flat black acrylic by Tamiya, and a blob of black gloss by Testors. I set it on the back shelf area of my drafting table in the indirect sunlight for a month. Then I put new blobs on and took it into work and used a densitometer to measure the before and after blobs. The Sharpie faded visually and also by the numbers read with the densitometer. The acrylic faded a little, and the enamel hardly at all. Yes, this was an extreme test and I know hardly anyone would leave a model in the indirect sunlight, but I wanted to see what would happen. Especially since once the windows are painted and if the black trim fades, you're screwed. Personally I will use the enamel from now on even though it requires more work. I hope this helps.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Would Testors flat black or semi-gloss enamel work as well as the gloss?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I assume it would. I could test that too. I also want to check and see if a Sharpie is dye based ink or if it has pigment in it. When we were using an HP inkjet at work for contract based proofs years ago, we had ink fade issues because it used dye inks. We have been using Epson pigment based inks now and have no problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I set it on the back shelf area of my drafting table in the indirect sunlight for a month...

I assume you mean direct sunlight? As in sun shining directly on it vs. general interior daylight?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I merged three topics, since they are all discussing how to best handle black window trim.

FWIW, black sharpie markers always seem to fade to an indigo color, giving the blackened trim a purplish tint...not good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Actually it is indirect sunlight because a thin curtain is always there, partially blocking the sun. That's why I left the test paper there for a month, to answer your question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now