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Carbs: The most unrealistic part on every model car I've had


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I haven't read the whole thread, and this has probably been mentioned before, but the blobular chassis detail molded-in-one-piece driveshaft/suspension/axles on the old AMT kits used to drive me buggy. That's probably one reason I moved to Revell kits back then...and probably a large part of the reason the prices of today's kits seem inflated more than inflation. It takes a LOT more tooling expense to do all those parts separately.

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Wow. That took some intense pattern-making...and very good eyes and fine muscle control !

Impressive, to say the least.

These were done in 3D and the the master printed at Shapeways. Then cast in resin. Chief Joseph is a member here, so he can give you more info than I.

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These were done in 3D and the the master printed at Shapeways. Then cast in resin. Chief Joseph is a member here, so he can give you more info than I.

Love it !! This is a perfect illustration of what the model car companies COULD be capable of consistently, using currently-available technology...if they want to. It's also a great indication of how modeling accuracy has every chance of improving more and more...especially in the hands of motivated, skilled aftermarket guys like this...as the technology proliferates.

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And cheap, $6 shipped for a pair. Are Ford carbs that diffrent that any of these couldnt be used on a Ford?

I'm not sure of the differences between the three GM carbs he has, never mind a Ford! :wacko: These deserve to be on any engine in a hot rod to show them off!

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Are Ford carbs that diffrent that any of these couldnt be used on a Ford?

Lotsa people swear by Rochester carbs (many swear AT them too), and you do see them rerofitted to Fords and other engines, so it's entirely up to you.

They wouldn't be appropriate for a build that was representing a completely stock Ford (to the best of my current knowledge), of course.

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In agreement with a comment made earlier by Jon Cole.............GLASS! If there's one item that's driven me crazy for years is the way out of scale and woefully distorted kit glass. It's one of the things that stopped my '59 Chevy build in its tracks, and there are a couple kits I refuse to build due to the glass being so bad. AMT's '57 Chrysler 300C come to mind--------------the rear backlite on that is so distorted that you see "lines" on the curved surfaces when it's viewed from certain angles.

Almost like my too thick eyeglass lenses! :o

I recently bought Micro-Mark's vacuformer, and every once and a while I'll play around with it to see what it'll do. It takes some practice, but I was able to get a not-so-bad looking new windshield molded for that '59, but I want it to be better.

I know this might not be a fair comparison, but Tamiya molds near flawless glass in each of their kits. Crystal clear, very little to no distortion, but as they say "you get what you pay for" and we all know how expensive Tamiya's kits can be.

Just the same, I wish the kit makers would spend a little more time in polishing up their molds so that we can get glass that's not so toy-like.

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Of course, the answer depends totally on which particular model(s) you're talking about. Some parts are done very well on one model, terribly on another.

As far as how many models are affected, I'd say unrealistically flat interior panels. Most cars, especially those older than the 80s, had window cranks, interior door handles, door lock pins, etc. that stood out from the surface. How many times have you seen a model with the interior panel details just sort of hinted at... or ignored altogether. It's especially obvious on convertibles, where the interior is the first thing you notice.

Harry,

Certainly true in the days of simple 1-piece "tub style" interiors in model car kits. With the introduction of platform-style interiors (and while we're at it, why the reliance on a separate interior floor laying on top of another floor pan already molded to attach to a separate frame?) it would be fairly simple to make the interior door hardware (handles and window cranks) as separate plated parts (for cars that have/had chrome hardware, unplated if that's what the real car has) and separate armrests where appropriate.

But, I suppose that long tradition, perhaps also tooling costs enter in here.

Art

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Only read a few pages into this topic and can't help but wondering, if all the people here are willing to spend $100 on a standard auto model kit.

Cuz that is what it will take, likely even more, cuz don't think stores like Michaels or Hobby Lobby will bother to stock these kits, mainly because their customers won't spend that kinda money, on what they always saw as a cheap past time..while model companies will have to spend an obscene amount of funds to get the job done to the specs we here ask for.

IMHO when seeing the mockup from Revell's S&H Torino, they're toning down on parts breakdown to lower the threshold in an attempt to catch and hold the casual buyer as a repeat customer.

I only see one path which will lead to the almost (there will always be issues) perfect automotive kit...and that is crowd funding...which means putting the wallet where ones mouth is, but first a few issues will have to be sorted out, like...

- What subject are we gonna kit (think we never gonna get past this one)

- Specifying the kit content and at what cost?

- Designate an engineer to do the research and who will see through this project start to finish.

- Getting a model company involved to tool, produce and market the kit

But anyway, even when all the noses point to the same direction, subject wise, I don't think there are enough people, to raise the necessary funds for such an undertaking, even not when all the boards and hobby groups on facebook unite...

Proof me wrong LOL

Edited by Luc Janssens
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Only read a few pages into this topic and can't help but wondering, if all the people here are willing to spend $100 on a standard auto model kit............

Luc, I fully understand what you're saying-------it's why I spend so much time practically re-engineering most of what I build from bumper to bumper. ;)

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Agree about kit "glass" - carbs and undercarriage details are often hidden and many times never seen by anybody but the builder. Glass, though, plays a huge part in a kit looking either like a real replica or a toyish representation. The Lindberg '64 Dodge kits are great - until you see the thick glass...

The bad part about thin, clear glass? It breaks. I have a few Tamiya kits with broken windshields. Revell '66 Impala has nice thin hlass too, and one I bought already had a crack. So there are trade offs.

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The most unrealistic part of any model??? Our collective expectations!

Seriously. A company could produce a 250 part kit, dead nutz down to the last wire, with 10 sheets of photo etch, 3 different engines, 4 sets of wheels and tires and offer it for $10 and still our silly herd would find fault with it!

And for every one posting on this thread that they'd pay for quality, there's 100 guys printing that Hobby Lobby 40% off coupon.

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Luc, I fully understand what you're saying-------it's why I spend so much time practically re-engineering most of what I build from bumper to bumper. ;)

Hey Bill,

Think it will remain that way, a model kit is the "basic" representation of a subject, which when one prefers, can be put to a higher level, using skills, talent and or money, with the use of aftermarket add-on or replacement parts.

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The most unrealistic part of any model??? Our collective expectations!

Seriously. A company could produce a 250 part kit, dead nutz down to the last wire, with 10 sheets of photo etch, 3 different engines, 4 sets of wheels and tires and offer it for $10 and still our silly herd would find fault with it!

And for every one posting on this thread that they'd pay for quality, there's 100 guys printing that Hobby Lobby 40% off coupon.

IMHO the topic should've been, what defines a good model kit to you personal, which will make the tread much more positive.

To me it's form follow function, ease of assembly throughout all the steps in the build and keeping it fun with all kinds of options and when finished better looking then a $15 diecast

;^)

Edited by Luc Janssens
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IMHO the topic should've been, what defines a good model kit to you personal, which will make the tread much more positive.

Actually, the topic is bad looking carburetors. I appreciate your discussion. though.

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Don't know if if this has mentioned but my personal gripe is the relationship between the front seat and the steering wheel rim. In the real world you couldn't fit behind it and drive....

This ^^

Also...

-floating alternator

-chrome belt

-license plate with car name or car year on it

-windows in multiple pieces

-multiple piece interiors

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The manufacturers know that model car kit buyers are incredibly price-conscious (or in plain English, cheap). That's part of the reason that manufacturers cut corners... to keep the price down and appeal to more potential buyers.

Military modelers are willing to pay for quality, and in general they get it. Most car modelers aren't willing to do that.

Yeah we're not all cheap, if I want something I'll happily pay for it. Revell kits are around the $35-50 mark here in Australia depending where you shop, Tamiya around the $50-70 mark. More expensive than the states, but we earn more so I guess it levels out sort of.

I buy a lot of old MPC and van kits off ebay and pay the freight from the US which is usually around the $25-30 mark and it doesn't worry me, if I want it, I'll pay for it. I'm just amazed how many sellers wont ship outside the US.

I don't think the cost of a kit would turn that many off, if it was a decent subject, accurate and a quality kit the majority would buy it even if it was more expensive.

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How so? Like ones with separate side panels?

Yeah. I hate em just because they never line up right like the one-piece tubs do, just like the windows that are separate.

I suppose it's not unrealistic in the way they're multiple piece, but how they line up with the doors.

Also, dogleg hinges. Geez, they're annoying.

Edited by chunkypeanutbutter
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