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Ford C1000 ? or Ford H series ?

29 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

I believe KW Kids comment on Flickr is correct. PIE did a lot of modifications and building in their own shops. This most likely is a shop built truck rather than something Ford manufactured.

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Posted · Report post

That is a Ford prototype for the H-series. They were built in 1959 by Hendrickson to Ford's specs, and distributed to P I E and other carriers for evaluation. There is a picture similar to this in James K Wagner's Ford Trucks Since 1905 book, I'll see if I can dig it out and get more info.

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Posted · Report post

With a sleeper that small I hope the driver was really short.

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Here's a scan of the page from the book... looks to be the exact same image, only in black and white.

6_377626952292968_1716827170_n-vi.jpg

On-the-job testing of the Ford H-Series concept began in the summer of 1959 when four dual-drive set-back axle prototypes such as this were placed in service of P-I-E, Spector-Midstates, Great Southern and Middle Atlantic Freight Lines. Custom-built by Hendrickson Manufacturing Company, to Ford's design and specifications, these tractors employed elevated C-Series cabs complete with sleepers. Notice how the original headlamp, grille, and wheelhouse openings were blocked off. Production units were quite similar.

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Posted · Report post

Thanks Chuck,

Great info, I have a COE cab with no running gear or chassis laying around thought this might be an interesting

build opp. Were there any more pics by chance.

Thanks Rick

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Posted · Report post

That's the only picture I've ever seen of one. I've been putting together a stash of parts to build one for years, and have been having a hard time finding anything but this one.

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Posted · Report post

Chuck ,thanks for sharing.I know there is one ,maybe two pictures on hankstruckpictures .I tried to find it,but there are only 100000 P.I.E. pics to search,so I haven't found it yet.

I think Ive seen another version also on this www. thingmajig.

If I was to build it, I'd start with a paystar frame toned down abit ,with say AMT frieghtliner steering box and rear suspention,just because of the set back axle and the wheels look real close.A 250 cummins from an autocar is ideal

Who's gonna build it

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Posted · Report post

None of the info I can find specifies exactly what engines the prototypes had- the production trucks could be had with any one of ten engines- Ford Super Duty gas V8s (!) or Cummins diesels, so the Autocar engine should work just fine. I'm sure that more than one engine type was used in the prototypes. I'm planning on using a cut-down White Freightliner DD chassis for mine, not sure if I'll modify the kit wheels to look more like the protoype wheels, or see if I can find something a bit closer in another kit or resin. Cab and interior would be from an AMT C-Series (obviously) and the rest would just be made up of flat pieces of styrene.

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Posted · Report post

Now I can add Hendrickson to the list of companies that used that Budd built cab. Actually that sleeper was fairly roomy for 1959. Would be a good project too bad pictures are so scarce for details. PIE by 1959 most likely had all their road tractors diesel powered. Since western based carriers were weight sensative the 4 spring suspension from the Freightliner makes sense.

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Posted · Report post

I forgot to mention that along with the rear suspention,the freightliner also has a 250 cummins.Just turn the oil pan around to cleat the set back axle

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Posted · Report post

Sounds good.

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I have the issue of Hemmings with that same article in my stash- pretty good source of information on the production trucks. I just wish there was a bit more info specific to the 1959 prototypes, but I guess it is what it is. I was planning on building a production H-Series truck, but I've seen quite a few of those built as models, which is why I want to do the prototype. The P-I-E version is the most commonly seen of the four prototypes, so I might do one in a Spector-Midstates, Great Southern, or Middle Atlantic Freight Lines paint scheme.

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Posted · Report post

Chuck,

A question, I remember reading something some time ago where Ford had actually protyped a tractor using the Econline van cab. Apparently when Dodge came up with

the l700 cab looked very silimiliar to the Ford prototype, is there any reference in the book you have of that cab. Was thinking that be another great build op.

Thanks

Rick

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Posted · Report post

There is one photograph of it. Ford quickly abandoned the idea, but Dodge either heard of the project or had been working on their own and came out with the L-Series. In that case, finding a 1:25 Econoline would be the biggest challenge.

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Ford didn't offer a diesel until 1961 or 62. As it is a prototype, and the H was the first to offer a diesel, it is possible that one or more of these trucks had a diesel, but also a good chance they had one of the big Ford Super Duty gas engines.

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Clearly the PIE truck is diesel with that big stack. Being prototypes built by Hendrickson and considering where they went I'd say all diesel.

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My guess would be that the prototypes were most likely diesels as well, since the Super Duty gas V8s were already in production by then.

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Posted · Report post

Can't wait to see pics. Maybe the Lindberg van trailer (old IMC) would look good with it.

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With a sleeper that small I hope the driver was really short.

Want a short sleeper try sleeping in an early International Emoryville!!! I'm 5'7" and it was short! :lol:

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Posted · Report post

I don't know- those C-Series cabs were a good seven feet wide inside. You could sit four guys abreast on the bench seat. Unless you're Andre the Giant or something, ought to be more than enough room in that sleeper. B)

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Posted · Report post

GMC crackerboxes were no picnic either at 6'3"

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Posted · Report post

Chuck,

A question, I remember reading something some time ago where Ford had actually protyped a tractor using the Econline van cab. Apparently when Dodge came up with

the l700 cab looked very silimiliar to the Ford prototype, is there any reference in the book you have of that cab. Was thinking that be another great build op.

Thanks

Rick

Here's a picture, and the information from the book.

5632330967_983ddd52e3_z-vi.jpg

After having dominated the tilt cab market since entering it in 1957, Ford became concerned that it had lost ground during 1962-63 to such competitors as the International Co Loadstar, Mack MB, and White Compact. Consequently, a new compact tilt cab concept vehicle was built in 1964 which employed the Econoline pickup cab mounted on a C-600-size forward control chassis. The company's intent in making such a model was to have offered it in 550-750 Series and to have employed Ford I-6 and FT-Series V8 gas engines and English Ford and small Cummins diesels. After thoroughly investigating the marketing aspects of revising the Ford Tilt Cab formulation, management decided not to pursue the concept further. Interestingly, Dodge either learned of Ford's effort, or working independently, developed a similar design of its own, and placed it on the market in early 1966 as the L-600 and L-700 models.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Any of you guys ecer seeen one of these:

http://www.flickr.co...N08/5232684940/

Can't fiqure out just exactly what it is ??

Rick

Rick, Nice find, a two story Falcon with a swept back axle ;) Just love those old coffin sleepers. I"m 5 10" and never had a problem with the IH Transtar II sleeper, but I think those old coffin sleepers were only about half the width of the Transtar bunk. Most of the cabovers I drove were single bunks, which used the same mattress as a a single bed. Ohh, no place like home :blink:

Edited by Rich_S

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