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Body filler of choice ?

24 posts in this topic

Posted

I am finding myself making more and more body repairs as I get back into the grove of building.

I bought some automotive spot filler and I am not not really happy with it.

what is the choice of late.,,,,something single part in a tube would be my preferance if at all possibile

and does it matter if the subject is molded in white/gray or some other colors ?

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Posted

I have found the pronto kombi spot putty to work really well. I also have an off brand putty I got from hobby town I like as well. comes in either green or white. I like both, and color doesn't really matter. I like the green because I can see it better when I am sanding down. I advise it all be primed before paint as always! hope this helps.

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Posted

I like Mr Surfacer as it comes in many thicknesses. I use the green or white stuff, Squadron brand, for large gaps to fill, but Mr Surfacer for smaller areas. I need to try Tamiya putty as I've heard great things.

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Posted

For small to modestly sized repair areas, I use super glue and baking soda...the baking soda catalyzes the glue and causes it to set almost immediately. It is slightly harder than the surrounding plastic to sand when fully cured, so it is best rough it in with course sandpaper or files in the seconds after it is applied and it is still curing. Apply the glue with a toothpick, sprinkle enough baking soda on the glue to fully cover the glue and work almost immediately with sandpaper or file. Superglue/baking soda areas will take primer and paint very much like bare plastic will, and worked areas will rarely stand out under primer and paint if you have finished them properly with the same grits as used on the surrounding areas.

Most solvent based putties can soften plastic and will shrink over time- while sold for hobby use, the old Squadron green and white putties (and other hobby putties of similar composition) are famous for shrinking, cracking and sinking below the surface of the repaired area over time if you have to use a relatively thick putty layer to accomplish the bodywork you have in mind. Automotive single-part putties are usually solvent based with even bigger chances for adverse effects when used on plastic if enough putty is applied without allowing those solvents to "gas out" completely before re-coating with putty or painting worked areas with solvent based paints...this can take several hours depending on how thick the puttied area is and requires building up thin coats of primer to cover without reacting with the putty.

For larger repairs it is hard to beat 2 part polyester putty (Tamiya makes some, but automotive products like Evercoat are much cheaper in bulk) as they cure quickly, remain stable when properly mixed and won't soften underlying plastic as there are no solvents involved. They also blend or feather extremely well into surrounding plastic if you've roughed up the entire area to be worked with a course file or sandpaper prior to applying your putty. Areas covered with 2 part polyester putty will take primer much like the surrounding plastic and once you get the hang of mixing the ratios and working the putty at the magic moment before maximum hardness is achieved, and is actually easier than using single part putty considering it can be sanded and covered with paint in mere minutes after curing.

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Posted

I've found that bondo is the best choice for me. If mixed right you will get the same turnout every time. no or very little shrinkage or cracking. Plus I like the smell of it.

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Posted

I would suggest you use a two-part catalyzed filler, instead of a one-part. One-part putties tend to shrink once the solvent component evaporates- putties like Squadron green and white are one example. Two-part fillers cure via an exothermic chemical reaction, not via evaporation, so shrinkage isn't an issue.

I like Evercoat's Eurosoft, but quite honestly, Bondo's two-part filler everyone is familiar with will work well, too.

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Posted

I use this stuff. It's a 2-part catalyzed system, it comes in a reasonably-sized container (not a "lifetime supply" sized can), and it's fairly cheap ($7-8).

Make sure you get the "professional" stuff. The regular 1-part putty comes in a very similar looking tube.

bondo-1.jpg

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Posted

I use this stuff. It's a 2-part catalyzed system, it comes in a reasonably-sized container (not a "lifetime supply" sized can), and it's fairly cheap ($7-8).

Make sure you get the "professional" stuff. The regular 1-part putty comes in a very similar looking tube.

bondo-1.jpg

Thats what I have started using, I like it as well, now I am not sure if I got the same one, mine has the stage 3 on it

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Posted

I use this stuff.

Make sure you get the "professional" stuff. The regular 1-part putty comes in a very similar looking tube.

Is that just the regular Bondo in a smaller container/tube?

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Posted

This is the stuff you don't want, it's the 1-part glazing putty (basically very thick primer):

http://www.amazon.co...y/dp/B0002JM8PY

Ahh thats the stuff I got, I have not had any problems with it, but I will get the one you post Harry

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Posted (edited)

I know everyone and his brother says NEVER use One Part Putty for ANY bodywork. I do some form of bodywork on every model I build. I DO agree with everything about two-part putty you all say, but you have to sometimes consider the job at hand.

Two-part putty IS the best . no shrink and quick cure. But it's the most inconvenient and costly to use and mixing is a guess from the get go. The Bondo putty Harry recommends is the best thing to happen to 2-part ... now you don't have the throw away half the $30 can as it ages. It's best for heavy and thick filling and does sand the best.

But, most body work I do involves pretty thin applications .. filling small holes, evening out fills that used 2-part putty, blending good fitting parts and filling cut lines. One Part Body putty works fine for this .. and NO measurable shrinkage, Yes, it always shrinks but it's a percentage of the thickness. It you fill a .01" hole the shrinkage as good as non-existent. What's so good is it takes no time to grab some putty and fill. Drying time is fast also with thin applications.

What it all comes down to is KNOW YOUR TOOLS. Both types of putty should be on your workbench to use as needed.

Edited by Foxer

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Posted (edited)

this for big jobs tamiya and bondo spot putty for small jobs

2fd3634b3a.jpg

Edited by Lownslow

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Posted

On 1:1 repair jobs... bondo spot putty is designed to go <on top> of a primer coat.

not sure if this has any bearing on plastic models , just though I would toss that tidbit into the mix.

it may help with potential softening, shrinking, adhesion issues?

I don't use it much so can't say either way myself.

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Posted

I've used Evercoat Ever-Glaze spot putty on 1/1 cars before I got back into the hobby and it just naturally came along for the ride. It's fast drying, spreads smooth and sands easily. I've never had a problem with cracking or shrinkage. You will need to prime the plastic before applying. You get a 16 oz tube for around $10.00 at your local auto parts store.

403.jpg

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Posted

I use Bondo spot putty and J.B. Weld.

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Posted

Use a 2 part finishing putty like Spot Lite by Evercoat and you will like the results. The talc in a finishing putty is ground finer than in a standard lightweight which helps it feather out nicely on our small canvases. Stay away from any of the single stage spot fillers out there, they are lacquer based and will cause you more trouble than they are worth with shrinking ,blending and bleeding.

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Posted

Thanks fellas,

I though I had posted the question once before , but couldn't find it. hence the repost. my apologies

I will get something new ordered for the next project.

Currently working on a 1964 Plymouth hardtop to sedan conversion and I will have several seams to fill

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Posted

Stay away from any of the single stage spot fillers out there, they are lacquer based and will cause you more trouble than they are worth with shrinking ,blending and bleeding.

I use one part putty extensively but never experienced blending or bleeding problems. Shrinkage, of course, but that was before I knew to use only thin layers. Once you know what the limits are, this is a quick and convenient product. Never say never. :)

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Posted

I use one part putty extensively but never experienced blending or bleeding problems. Shrinkage, of course, but that was before I knew to use only thin layers. Once you know what the limits are, this is a quick and convenient product. Never say never. :)

ing

Waiting hours for a product to dry AND having to apply in thin layers to avoid shrinkage issues does not make a product quick or convenient in my eyes.

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Posted

Is that just the regular Bondo in a smaller container/tube?

More or less, yes. It does use the same hardener, but the putty itself is a finer consistancy than regular Bondo in the can. Spreads very nicely.

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Posted

ing

Waiting hours for a product to dry AND having to apply in thin layers to avoid shrinkage issues does not make a product quick or convenient in my eyes.

When it's applied in a thin layer it doesn't take hours to dry. Maybe a few minutes longer than two-part but you're not having to mess with the mixing. As I've said before, the right tool for the right job. Filling a scratch doesn't need two-part putty. I DO use two-part all the time for the big and thick jobs ... right tool, right job

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Posted

I do a lot of heavy bodywork and major mods, radical chops and restyles. I've found that for me, the 2-part polyester glazing putties ( like Evercoat or my favorite, USC Icing) work exceptionally well for building a shape or fairing together two completely different parts. Once I've got the work in primer, I'll use one-part putty (right now Squadron green), to correct very minor flaws after sanding. Sand the puttied area, primer again. Over and over, letting it all shrink in thoroughly between applications. So far so good, and I'm extremely critical of the final appearance of my own work.

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Posted

This, for larger areas, & superglue for smaller areas. Although, I have been using lots more superglue in the past year or 2. It's so good for filling ejector pin marks, mis-matched seam lines, etc.

filler.jpg

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