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Using Automotive Interior Touch-Up Paints For Model Car Interiors?

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As I wait for my 1967 1/12 Scale Corvette to arrive in the mail next week, I've been building up my supplies and painting options available to me. I've settled on a color of Goodwood Green Metallic which I just ordered from an online store (Automotive Touch-Up which offers paints that dry SUPER hard and incredibly fast, and don't attack plastic), with a black interior and white hood stripe.

Now what I'm waffling on is how to paint the interior. I could always use the Model Master Acrylic paints as I love the ease of clean-up and great coverage they provide, but would also like to be able to get an authentic sheen and coloring that the automotive interior touch-up paints provide.

My local AutoZone store offers the Rust-o-leum flat black interior vinyl/fabric paint, as well as the Duplicor Vinyl/Fabric paint in the flat black color I'm looking for.

Has anybody ever used these paints on their cars before? Do they attack plastics? (Though I plan on using a lacquer primer from the Automotive Touch-Up store to prime everything as it does not attack styrene). How do the paints look when dry? I've never used them before and don't want to spent the $8.00 on a can of it only to never use it again. (Still kicking myself for buying a large can of GM Blue Engine Enamel when it was only used on the 1953 Corvette model I just finished). I took a search through the forums here and couldn't find any posts about it. (Whether from the fact that there are none, or my search abilities are severely lacking).

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Posted · Report post

The Duplicolor interior paints work very well on styrene. I've shot it straight on the bare plastic with no problems, though priming first might be a good idea. The sheen was perfect for the old GM interiors from the '60s/'70s.

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Interior specific paints should have a flex additive to prevent cracking and chipping on materials softer than typically found on the outside of a car. I'd still prime, but it'd probably stick anyway.

I haven't heard much about this since I've been back into building, but another great way to get a variety of sheen is to use a flat paint then get some of the oil from your skin (nose and forehead are great spots) and rub the painted surface to the desired level of semi-gloss. A q-tip will help you work it into the corners and such.

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Thanks guys. Good news to hear. With this project being a 67 Corvette, knowing that it matches the color/sheen of the GM cars from that era is very good to know.

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Just as a follow-up, I went to AutoZone and picked up a can of the Duplicolor Fabric and Vinyl paint. The 12 ounce can of Flat Black cost $6.00 and I tested it out on some spare styrene sprue I had lying around. It covers very well, dries incredibly quick, and seems quite durable. I like this stuff. The sheen isn't quite fully flat like the MM acrylic flat black that I use, but it's not nearly as glossy as the semi-gloss paints tend to be. I think it looks really good and I can't wait for my kit to arrive in the mail so I can really get going on this. :)

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