Pins and tooth picks

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Hi guys well here is a useful tip if you add lots of detail to your model kit by painting .I found its really handy to use sewing needles and tooth picks for painting detail like window trim and emblems also many other small parts on a model.Its a cheaper way then buying a super fine brush.So hope this helps you guys out some.

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While I like using a super-fine brush, I'll have to try your way as some of the detail is way too small for a brush. Thanks.

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I have used toothpicks at times for bolts n knobs etc. works great.

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I have used the straight pins with the round head for years. The round head gives you a good hold while doing small detailing. Richard

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I have used the straight pins with the round head for years. The round head gives you a good hold while doing small detailing. Richard

The pins with the round head on them also make great shifter handles and you can paint the pin head any color you want.

they can be bent easily for the shape of shifter arm you want.

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Hi guys well here is a useful tip if you add lots of detail to your model kit by painting .I found its really handy to use sewing needles and tooth picks for painting detail like window trim and emblems also many other small parts on a model.Its a cheaper way then buying a super fine brush.So hope this helps you guys out some.

Hi George,

Many thanks for this idea Sir, it's something I'd not even given a thought of using, gave it a quick try and works perfectly...

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They also work great for '68 Charger side markers as well. Plus also as rivets too! Also good for door locks on the muscle car's and older cars with round door locks.

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i've used paper matches to paint. tear off comb, narrow with razor if needed, and dip into & paint. toss when done.

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I use dental picks for a lot of painting like you mentioned.

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I have used the straight pins with the round head for years. The round head gives you a good hold while doing small detailing. Richard

You could even insert your straight pins, sewing needles, toothpicks, etc. into your pin vise for even better grip..

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I've used straight pins more than a few times to make really durable radio antennae (back when those were always mounted on the upper rear corner of the right front fender panels), by drilling a hole in the fender, putting a little drop of epoxy on top of the fender, then pushing the pin (with head clipped off, and the cut end smoothed down, to give a "base" to it. I then clip off the sharp tip, and put the tiniest drop of epoxy on the end--which when given a drop of silver paint, makes a perfect ball-tip to the antenna. On the second of the '50 Olds kits I am working up right now, ball-head straight pins will get the call for "curb feelers", those spring steel, ball tipped pieces of plated steel rod that were used to warn a driver that he was getting close enough to a curb when parking, to scuff his whitewalls.

Art

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....get the call for "curb feelers" ...

now that's old school

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For you fire apparatus modelers out there, take a simple flat round headed pin and file the top and bottom 1/3 of the pin off to give yourself a "T" handled valve. This type is commonly found on a pump panel and pulls outward. For gated type valves, cut a small piece of plastic rod or sprue. Lay the disc flat and drill a small hole the diameter of the pin(round headed pin) into the side. Cut the pin to length and glue in place. Below is an example of the gated type ball pin valves:

416-09.jpg

Hope this helps.

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Yeah I've used toothpicks and straight pins for painting small details and for applying glues and epoxy. The round pin heads get used for tonneau cover snaps and some dashboard knobs and tops of master cylinder reservoirs. I've also used some round wound guitar string (the D string) for curb feelers.

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