Auto ID #64 FINISHED!

14 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

Remember, do not post hints or answers here. PM me with specific year, make and model.

autoid64.jpg

The answer: 1937-40 Adler 2.5 liter "Limousine"

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Posted · Report post

OWWWW Harry, sumpthin I can't UNSEE!!!!

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Posted · Report post

...And it sees you!

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Posted · Report post

Clearly inspired by (and a bunch better looking than) the Chrysler/Imperial/DeSoto Airflows from the 1930's. I'll have to do a bit of research this evening and get back to you on it.

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Posted · Report post

I partially know Harry is all I am saying . Not enough , but somewhat . Thanx ..

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Posted · Report post

No, it's not an early Beetle! No, it's not a Chrysler Airflow!

It's a 1937 (through 1040) Adler 2.5 liter "Limousine" (Limousine in reference to it having four doors, not that it's a limo in the way we think of limo).

Who got it right:

ChrisR

george53

Chillyb1

Mr Chips

Badluck13

GHolding

Kenny

Johnag4004

Junkman

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Posted · Report post

In doing research for the Jo-Han Mercedes 500K Roadster Limousine (a 2-door hardtop), it appears that "Limousine" in German basically refers to a hardtop car, regardless of doors - "saloon" in Britain, "sedan" in the U.S.

Christian, what do you think?

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Posted · Report post

I knew that.

:mellow:

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Posted · Report post

It's a 1937 (through 1040) Adler 2.5 liter "Limousine" (Limousine in reference to it having four doors, not that it's a limo in the way we think of limo).

In doing research for the Jo-Han Mercedes 500K Roadster Limousine (a 2-door hardtop), it appears that "Limousine" in German basically refers to a hardtop car, regardless of doors - "saloon" in Britain, "sedan" in the U.S.

No, no, no, and no. Limousine refers to any car having three side windows. It connotes nothing else, not in German and not in any other language.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I knew I had seen it before and I was pretty certain it was German. I couldn't remember the manufacturer. And I STILL think it looks better than the Airflow... Now check out their sleek Trumpf model from the same era. Nice job, Harry. :)

Edited by CorvairJim

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Posted (edited) · Report post

No, no, no, and no. Limousine refers to any car having three side windows. It connotes nothing else, not in German and not in any other language.

OK I am totally confused now...I see two definations for limousine here, and now #3. From Wikipedia...A limousine (or limo) originally meant an "enclosed automobile with open drivers seat and was named from the French limousine (in the Occitan language) that was originally an adjective referring to a region in central France. The automobile meaning evolving from a type of cloak and hood that was worn by the inhabitants of the Limousin region that later resembled the covering of a carriage and much later used to describe an automobile body with a permanent top that extended over the open driver's compartment. The term now refers to a luxury sedan or saloon car, especially one with a lengthened wheelbase or driven by a chauffeur.

Edited by G Holding

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Posted · Report post

This is one of the most radical Adlers, most of which were pretty typical of the time. Here's a cabrio version.

ter_cabriolet_by_Karmann_19381-vi.jpgHosted on Fotki

And one from 1937.

mousine_Competitio_CoupefVlmx1-vi.jpgHosted on Fotki

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Posted · Report post

In Germany, a 'Limousine' is a simple saloon (or sedan), either 2-door or 4-door. What you know as a limousine, i.e. a chauffeur driven car with a divider screen, is called a 'Pullmann Limousine' in Germany.

Other German expressions for different body shapes are:

Convertible = Cabriolet

Wagon = Kombi

Pick-Up = Pritsche (or Pritschenwagen)

The following are used in the same way as in English: van, bus, coupe, roadster.

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Posted · Report post

Oh, I would have known this one, but somehow I managed to miss it. :wacko: Well, next time better.

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