scratchbuilt - ?

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Posted · Report post

why is the term scratchbuilt used, when something is actually an assembly of modified kit parts from a variety of sources?

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Posted · Report post

Because in that instance it's used incorrectly. Linguistic precision is not a high priority for a lot of folks, and maybe some just don't know the actual meaning of the term.

Of course, kitbashed or kitmingled are the right terms, but they don't have as much appeal as "scratchbuilt".

And of course, PARTS of a build may very well be scratchbuilt. Again, it's linguistic precision that matters.

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Posted · Report post

Why is it called scratchbuilt or built from scratch, when it's made of plastic or metal, or some other material other than scratch?

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Posted · Report post

You know I don't really recall this happening too often here. Generally when someone here calls their work scratch-built they are being accurate. So the best thing here would be to just not worry about it and carry on with your life.

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Posted · Report post

Because in that instance it's used incorrectly. Linguistic precision is not a high priority for a lot of folks, and maybe some just don't know the actual meaning of the term.

And in the very same post you used the word "build" as a noun which is also incorrect. I'm just sayin' :D

But of course you're not alone in this. The incorrect usage of build has become so common as to be almost acceptable. Drives me crazy though. I have hundreds of completed models and several ongoing projects, but nary a "build" in the bunch!

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Posted (edited) · Report post

And in the very same post you used the word "build" as a noun which is also incorrect. I'm just sayin' :D

But of course you're not alone in this. The incorrect usage of build has become so common as to be almost acceptable. Drives me crazy though. I have hundreds of completed models and several ongoing projects, but nary a "build" in the bunch!

Interesting thing is that the language IS fluid and constantly changing, (remember when 'awesome' was reserved for things like a space-shuttle launch, 'change-up' was purely a baseball term and not a synonym for the verb 'change', and an item had a 'price', not a 'price-point'?) and as you state, this usage of "build", both in the 1:1 car world and in models, is so all-pervasive that it has become the accepted term. Frankly, it bothered me for a while too. "Scratchbuilt", on the other hand, has had an accepted meaning in arts, craft and hobby communities for many many decades, and its usage to mean something else by a few ignorant individuals doesn't change its definition, though I'm afraid 'awesome' is a lost cause. B)

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Posted · Report post

why is the term scratchbuilt used, when something is actually an assembly of modified kit parts from a variety of sources?

Because some people don't know the meaning of "scratchbuilt."

Taking some brass sheet, some aluminum rod and tubing, and maybe some bits and pieces of styrene sheet and channel, etc., and making a funny car chassis with that material is an example of a scratchbuilt chassis.

Taking the body and interior from one kit, the wheels and tires from your spare parts box, the engine from another kit, etc., and putting it all together is an example of a "kitbashed" model. No scratchbuilding involved.

Of course it gets messy when you scratchbuild a chassis and add it to your kitbashed model... in which case I'll leave the definition of that to someone else! "Scratchbashed," maybe? :D

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Posted · Report post

if you have enough scratch.........you can have anything built.

just kiddin'.

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Posted · Report post

same thing when restaurants sell "homemade" food.....

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Posted · Report post

Scratchbuilding a model or part is the same as baking a cake from scratch... mixing all the basic ingredients together instead of using a cake mix that already has the most of the ingredients packaged in a convenient box (a kit, per se).

And Drew, the word "build" is perfectly okay used as a noun to describe a form or construction. I'm in the SS of the grammar nazis :D

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Posted · Report post

While on the subject of scratch, does anyone else here remember when scratch was a colloquial term for money? If so then we could have a model purchased from annother person as scratch built. :lol:

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Posted · Report post

And Drew, the word "build" is perfectly okay used as a noun to describe a form or construction. I'm in the SS of the grammar nazis :D

Not really.

Build (noun)

9. the physical structure, especially of a person; physique;figure: He had a strong build.

10. the manner or form of construction: The house was of modern build.

11. Masonry:

a. a vertical joint.

b. the vertical dimension of a stone laid on its bed.

No mention of the word "build" used as a noun referring to a built model or replica.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

. . . and I'll bet Joseph isn't really a Chief. But I do believe he is correct in ,as did Bill ( who probably (prolly) isn't an Ace) their opinions.. My guess is Harry needs a new dictionary. Do they still make those ?

Edited by Greg Myers

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Posted · Report post

. . . and I'll bet Joseph isn't really a Chief. But I do believe he is correct in ,as did Bill ( who probably (prolly) isn't an Ace) their opinions.. My guess is Harry needs a new dictionary. Do they still make those ?

just saying something is right doesn't necessarily make it right.

Look it up yourself.

http://dictionary.re...rowse/build?s=t

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Posted · Report post

Interesting thing is that the language IS fluid and constantly changing, (remember when 'awesome' was reserved for things like a space-shuttle launch, 'change-up' was purely a baseball term and not a synonym for the verb 'change', and an item had a 'price', not a 'price-point'?) and as you state, this usage of "build", both in the 1:1 car world and in models, is so all-pervasive that it has become the accepted term. Frankly, it bothered me for a while too. "Scratchbuilt", on the other hand, has had an accepted meaning in arts, craft and hobby communities for many many decades, and its usage to mean something else by a few ignorant individuals doesn't change its definition, though I'm afraid 'awesome' is a lost cause. B)

Interesting thing is that the language IS fluid and constantly changing, (remember when 'awesome' was reserved for things like a space-shuttle launch, 'change-up' was purely a baseball term and not a synonym for the verb 'change', and an item had a 'price', not a 'price-point'?) and as you state, this usage of "build", both in the 1:1 car world and in models, is so all-pervasive that it has become the accepted term. Frankly, it bothered me for a while too. "Scratchbuilt", on the other hand, has had an accepted meaning in arts, craft and hobby communities for many many decades, and its usage to mean something else by a few ignorant individuals doesn't change its definition, though I'm afraid 'awesome' is a lost cause. B)

Your prolly rite.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Thank you Harry, I was just on my way over to an on-line dictionary.

As a writer, using the word "build" as a noun is just like fingernails on a chalkboard to me.

It's most common (and most excepted) use is as a verb:

build

   

verb (used with object)

1.

to construct (especially something complex) by assembling and joining parts or materials: to build a house.

2.

to establish, increase, or strengthen (often followed by up ): to build a business; to build up one's hopes.

3.

to mold, form, or create: to build boys into men.

You can build a model car, but you can't build a build.

Edited by 2002p51

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Posted · Report post

Same here. I also write professionally, and improper usage bugs me. I know that a lot of modelers think that a "build" is what they have created, and that's fine... they can call their models French poodles if they want to. But referring to a finished model as a "build" is incorrect.

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Posted · Report post

just saying something is right doesn't necessarily make it right.

This is really the heart of the problem. So many people today think it doesn't matter or they were never corrected in school and so you hear things like "axe" instead of "ask". Lately I'm noticing the pronunciation; 'ekspecially' instead of 'especially" creeping into use and I don't know where that's coming from. But I hear it a lot on TV from people who should know better.

As long as we're on this topic, using the acronym "NASCAR" as a noun is another one that bugs me and is incorrect. And it's most prominant among modelers. A model of a Dale Earnhardt car isn't a nascar, it's a NASCAR race car, or a Winston Cup car, or any number of other correct terms other than just "nascar".

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Posted · Report post

Drew, trying to get some people to use correct English is a losing battle. So many people are just so used to using incorrect grammar or spelling that they'll never change. If you haven't learned it by the time you finish grade school, you probably never will.

This is really the heart of the problem. So many people today think it doesn't matter or they were never corrected in school and so you hear things like "axe" instead of "ask". Lately I'm noticing the pronunciation; 'ekspecially' instead of 'especially" creeping into use and I don't know where that's coming from. But I hear it a lot on TV from people who should know better.

Or people saying "I could care less" when they mean the exact opposite. :rolleyes:

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Posted · Report post

And you just know some wise guy is going to post this here:

As far as bad grammer, I could care less.

:lol:

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Posted · Report post

And you just know some wise guy is going to post this here:

As far as bad grammer, I could care less.

:lol:

As far as bad grammar, I could care less, I've got a build to finish, it's a nascar.

And now I'm going to kill my self! :blink:

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Posted · Report post

if you have enough scratch.........you can have anything built.

just kiddin'.

I feed the chickens scratch every morning. I had no idea you could build builds with it :D

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Posted · Report post

Actually I could care more, but I don't.

When I am at my workbench, I'm always building and scratching.

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Posted · Report post

As far as bad grammar, I could care less, I've got a build to finish, it's a nascar.

Man, Drew, what a dope you are. Everyone knows it's "I have a build to finish, it's a nascar.'

Didn't they teach you nuthin in 3rd grade?

:P:lol:

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Posted · Report post

Thank you Harry, I was just on my way over to an on-line dictionary.

As a writer, using the word "build" as a noun is just like fingernails on a chalkboard to me.

It's most common (and most excepted) use is as a verb:...

Seriously? Two mistakes in a sentence criticizing other people...from a writer?

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