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CaseyG83

What did you get today?

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A couple of recent acquisitions for my "Too Weird to Be Believed" collection....

 

 

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Ohhh, I never saw THAT version of the Deora before - interesting!  Any chance of a pic of the contents?  Too cool man!

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Flea Market Day.  No good hauls this week.  One seller had a very nice 1961 Mercury Monterey 2-dr hardtop promo.  Good condition, complete and undamaged, only the whitewall tires were a little dirty.  No warp, since AMT was using polystyrene and not Cycolac for promos by 1961, IIRC. He was asking $40.  

Another seller had 2 1960 Ford promos, 1 hardtop and 1 convertible.  They were Cycolac and seriously banana-shaped.    

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Thanks.  A quick look on eBay turned up a few, with the search "Imai 1/28."  Here's a Ford CL9000.  I put in the auction link because it has detailed photos of the parts and instruction sheet:

 

I checked that out, and the instructions are the same style as what is in the KW and also seen another from the same seller. I would say mine was very well bought compared to the prices of those two!:lol:

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Flea Market Day.  No good hauls this week.  One seller had a very nice 1961 Mercury Monterey 2-dr hardtop promo.  Good condition, complete and undamaged, only the whitewall tires were a little dirty.  No warp, since AMT was using polystyrene and not Cycolac for promos by 1961, IIRC. He was asking $40.  

Another seller had 2 1960 Ford promos, 1 hardtop and 1 convertible.  They were Cycolac and seriously banana-shaped.    

Think you're confusing Cycolac with acetate. Cycolac is a ABS type plastic and AMT used it for their Turnpike slot cars because of its toughness.

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Got a whole bag of wheels/rims! 5 spoke mags for days! Also a set of 4 tires wheels and backing plates. Next I get the fun od sorting through all those rims and breaking the20170816_141152.thumb.jpg.5b6b27058d3db120170816_141156.thumb.jpg.bc5c21a0731a54m down into sets! k=loving Ebay!

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Think you're confusing Cycolac with acetate. Cycolac is a ABS type plastic and AMT used it for their Turnpike slot cars because of its toughness.

Yep, thanks.  According to an old Art Anderson post, what I meant was Tenite: "Those older JoHan promo's prior to 1963 (and AMT promo's through 1961) were most certainly molded in acetate plastic (trade name Tenite), and for a very good reason: Safety. Styrene plastic in its early years was very brittle, and a styrene plastic toy, when dropped, could shatter very much like glass. Acetate plastic doesn't have that hazard as it is a lot tougher, more resilient. However, acetate plastic has a tendency to shrink after being molded, as well as being affected by humidity, which leads to warping of complex hollow shapes, such as a promotional model car body. For 1962 promo's, AMT switched to a then-new type of plastic: Cycolac, which was the early trade name for ABS plastic. JoHan made this switch for their promo's for 1963 (MPC came along a couple of years after the introduction of ABS."
 

And I didn't get one of these, but just saw it on eBay (Buy It Now price of $100, so I won't be getting it any time soon, either).  Thought people with a fondness for weird kits (like me) might appreciate it.  This is the "Nichimo 1/20 Honda Vamos Leisure Car Series 4:"

 

vamos.jpg

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The '61 Tempest arrived this afternoon - looks even better than I hoped. Dying to get at those window frames tonight :D...

Question: Has anyone built one of these kits and tried to flatten out the bulged spots in the hood? AMT molded depressions under the hood to be cut open for louvers, which left two oblong 3/16" x 3/4" bulges on top. Just wondering if there's enough plastic there to sand them down without opening big holes in the hood. Over to the experts!

Edited by ChrisBcritter

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The '61 Tempest arrived this afternoon - looks even better than I hoped. Dying to get at those window frames tonight :D...

Question: Has anyone built one of these kits and tried to flatten out the bulged spots in the hood? AMT molded depressions under the hood to be cut open for louvers, which left two oblong 3/16" x 3/4" bulges on top. Just wondering if there's enough plastic there to sand them down without opening big holes in the hood. Over to the experts!

I would fill the depressions on the underside of the hood with plastic first & then sand.

Chances are strong that if you don't, at the very least, you will wind up with "ghosting" issues with those voids if you don't.

Treat them the same way that you would prepping a hood that has the scoring on the underside for a hood scoop.

As you can see in these photos, this '69 Coronet hood had very deeply scored lines for a scoop.

I filled them with the black plastic before I did any sanding & shaping on the surface of the hood.

You can see by the second photo how thin the plastic was.

 

 

DSCN5318DSCN5319

 

By the time it was finished, you would never know that they were there.

 

DSCN5546

 

Steve

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Yep, thanks.  According to an old Art Anderson post, what I meant was Tenite: "Those older JoHan promo's prior to 1963 (and AMT promo's through 1961) were most certainly molded in acetate plastic (trade name Tenite), and for a very good reason: Safety. Styrene plastic in its early years was very brittle, and a styrene plastic toy, when dropped, could shatter very much like glass. Acetate plastic doesn't have that hazard as it is a lot tougher, more resilient. However, acetate plastic has a tendency to shrink after being molded, as well as being affected by humidity, which leads to warping of complex hollow shapes, such as a promotional model car body. For 1962 promo's, AMT switched to a then-new type of plastic: Cycolac, which was the early trade name for ABS plastic. JoHan made this switch for their promo's for 1963 (MPC came along a couple of years after the introduction of ABS."
 

And I didn't get one of these, but just saw it on eBay (Buy It Now price of $100, so I won't be getting it any time soon, either).  Thought people with a fondness for weird kits (like me) might appreciate it.  This is the "Nichimo 1/20 Honda Vamos Leisure Car Series 4:"

 

vamos.jpg

That is cool....I like some odd stuff too.

Nice Coronet Steve....hope to find parts for my MPC 68 and 69 someday.

Edited by disabled modeler

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I would fill the depressions on the underside of the hood with plastic first & then sand.

Chances are strong that if you don't, at the very least, you will wind up with "ghosting" issues with those voids if you don't.

Treat them the same way that you would prepping a hood that has the scoring on the underside for a hood scoop.

As you can see in these photos, this '69 Coronet hood had very deeply scored lines for a scoop.

I filled them with the black plastic before I did any sanding & shaping on the surface of the hood.

You can see by the second photo how thin the plastic was.

By the time it was finished, you would never know that they were there.

 

Steve

Thanks Steve! I got it apart overnight and it looks pretty thin underneath, so I'll be doing some filling.

Good news is almost NO cement was used! Only the wheelcovers were glued to the wheel backs (they came off with just a little effort) and the shifter glued to the floor (cut it off and ground it smooth). It has one small glue spot at the top of the rear window where the original builder tried to install the mirror before realizing he had it backwards.

So I trimmed off some flash and into the purple pond it went. :)

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Yep, thanks.  According to an old Art Anderson post, what I meant was Tenite: "Those older JoHan promo's prior to 1963 (and AMT promo's through 1961) were most certainly molded in acetate plastic (trade name Tenite), and for a very good reason: Safety. Styrene plastic in its early years was very brittle, and a styrene plastic toy, when dropped, could shatter very much like glass. Acetate plastic doesn't have that hazard as it is a lot tougher, more resilient. However, acetate plastic has a tendency to shrink after being molded, as well as being affected by humidity, which leads to warping of complex hollow shapes, such as a promotional model car body. For 1962 promo's, AMT switched to a then-new type of plastic: Cycolac, which was the early trade name for ABS plastic. JoHan made this switch for their promo's for 1963 (MPC came along a couple of years after the introduction of ABS."
 

And I didn't get one of these, but just saw it on eBay (Buy It Now price of $100, so I won't be getting it any time soon, either).  Thought people with a fondness for weird kits (like me) might appreciate it.  This is the "Nichimo 1/20 Honda Vamos Leisure Car Series 4:"

 

vamos.jpg

No problem, just figure you got brand names switched.

Nichimo sure did some weird models of weird cars. Would love one of those if it was 1/24-25 which was the other issue with Nichimo is they used a lot of weird scales. By the way has anyone figured out were 1/28 came from. I've seen it primarily on Asian sourced models, including the paper models I mess with, but have never found anyone that knows how it originated. Figure it must be some kind of metric conversion. Anyone?? 

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Got my last order from the Modelhaus today!😀

Bittersweet experience; I was looking forward to receiving all of the goodies, but sad to think that there won't be any more....

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This is another one of Harry's models...a Harley Sportster modified by him. It was an Imex kit

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With the big F up by that photo server who shall not be named we have lost a lot of photos in threads, so nice to bring back one of his pics

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I just posted this on another, Mopar modeling site, but it fits this topic, too.

Have to give a big shoutout to the folks who sold me a nice resin repop of a very rare kit: The body, bumpers, grill and taillights to the classic and hard to find MPC Feverbee 1968 Dodge Coronet R/T. 

I found it purely by chance, listed on eBay for less than $35, from a vendor called mustang_mom44820. They offered it more than once and I bought the second copy after dithering too long over the first, which sold quickly. So I am assuming that they have more copies to sell yet. 

Keep an eye on this vendor, because they also offered a similar kit of the old MPC 1969 Dodge Coronet for a similar price. If I see it relisted, you can bet I'm gonna grab one, too!

They delivered the item very quickly (two days quicker than eBay estimated), it was packaged extremely carefully, and was in superb condition. It is a very clean casting, very thin-walled, with excellent detail and very little flashing, and absolutely no air bubbles or other casting errors.

68 Coronet RT resin model.jpg

UPDATE: For anyone interested, the same vendor has right now available the same 68 transkit, now with interior and chassis; and a 69 Coronet R/T body shell with front and rear bumpers, grill and taillight assemblies

 

Edited by chriscarroll.ogre
Updated availability

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Got my "Grandt Line" nuts & washers/ antenna bases today thanks to Nick's, (High octane) suggestion.

Should be set for antennas for a long time!

 

Steve

 

DSCN6183

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IMG_0269.JPG

Mike, that oh-so-kool topless Deora is one I never knew existed. Nice score.

I got another copy of some of my old ex-grail favorites, both remarkably virgin and complete, with most of the parts still on the trees. Both of these kits mean a lot to me from when I was a kid, about 14. The "tub" was the first or second really good paint job I ever did...Testors black enamel that took its own sweet time to dry, but surprisingly flashed-off before any of the Jersey shore summertime bugs landed in it. The latest XR-6 kit gives me enough to put together a really mint one to keep, and one to build with today's level of finish and detail

                                                                                                           Image result for AMT Xr6

I got another one of these too...again in part to help assemble one really complete and unmolested keeper, and more bits to build from. Perfect set of original decals in this one too, which I was lacking in the other copies of it I have.

                                                                                                             Image result for AMT ala-kart

Also picked up one of these relatively cheap. I just hadn't gotten around to it previously, as I didn't like the proportions of the chop in the photos I'd seen. Nice kit though, I like the looks up close and personal, and I'm pretty sure she's going to get built as a flip-nose gasser. The fadeaways have me in the hmmmmmm mode as well.

                          Related image

 

 

 

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Got the tweezers from CVS pharmacy and the pointed Q-tips from Family Dollar for a dollar20170818_173817.thumb.jpg.2856421e4b3cbf

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I stopped in at an antiques market this afternoon, not expecting to find anything interesting. Came across a couple of aircraft and ship models, and then found a vendor with a number of built-up models. There is nothing out of the ordinary, until I came across a complete Hubley Metropolitan. I have seen these before, but usually as resin re-pops. The original builder used plenty of glue on the interior posts, but with Dremel and de-bonder, it did come apart. Now to see what it looks like when it comes out of the dunk tank.

 

 

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Now there's something you don't see every day! B)

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I just posted this on another, Mopar modeling site, but it fits this topic, too.

Have to give a big shoutout to the folks who sold me a nice resin repop of a very rare kit: The body, bumpers, grill and taillights to the classic and hard to find MPC Feverbee 1968 Dodge Coronet R/T.

I found it purely by chance, listed on eBay for less than $35, from a vendor called mustang_mom44820. They offered it more than once and I bought the second copy after dithering too long over the first, which sold quickly. So I am assuming that they have more copies to sell yet.

Keep an eye on this vendor, because they also offered a similar kit of the old MPC 1969 Dodge Coronet for a similar price. If I see it relisted, you can bet I'm gonna grab one, too!

They delivered the item very quickly (two days quicker than eBay estimated), it was packaged extremely carefully, and was in superb condition. It is a very clean casting, very thin-walled, with excellent detail and very little flashing, and absolutely no air bubbles or other casting errors.

68 Coronet RT resin model.jpg

Thanks for the headsup. Have to keep my eye open for one of these.

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James:

This kit is pretty much the same as the "stock" Debora kit except for the box and the instructions. The instructions tell you how/where to chop the top to make it into a convertible if you so desire. 😉

 

 

IMG_0273.JPG

IMG_0274.JPG

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I stopped in at an antiques market this afternoon, not expecting to find anything interesting. Came across a couple of aircraft and ship models, and then found a vendor with a number of built-up models. There is nothing out of the ordinary, until I came across a complete Hubley Metropolitan. I have seen these before, but usually as resin re-pops. The original builder used plenty of glue on the interior posts, but with Dremel and de-bonder, it did come apart. Now to see what it looks like when it comes out of the dunk tank.

 

 

IMG_0322.JPG

IMG_0323.JPG

IMG_0324.JPG

IMG_0325.JPG

IMG_0326.JPG

IMG_0328.JPG

Now that is cool! I like those old Hubley kits. I need a Met and one of their Ford station wagons.

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Added a '71 Monte Carlo to my recently acquired '72 unit.

Should make for a decent restoration....

 

IMG_0275.JPG

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IMG_0273.JPG

IMG_0274.JPG

Ohhhhhh, haha - I was surprised that they made a whole new tool just for a convertible version.  Guess they didnt!

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