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I really appreciate the precision of your work Mark. It takes more skill than most model builders realize to get all these parts to fit correctly.

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Super cool build I love those cars. My stepdad has one we sure have fun with it at track days and autocross stuff.

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Thanks Chris.

The front sway bar and the stabilizer links (including the bushings) are in the bag. Too many tiny parts I didn’t want to risk losing. Mostly brass with some machined aluminum for the nuts & bolts & washers and soft vinyl for the rubber bushings.

I also added the tabs for the stabilizer links to the lower control arms.

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Edited by Scale-Master

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I added the seat mounting rails to the frame.

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And I made the brackets for the seats. This is the left, hence the engraved “L”…

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The seats snap onto the rails and allow the seats slide.

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Fantastic work to be sure. Compared to this my builds look like I built them with my feet !

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I really want to thank you for pushing me into doing more brass work Mark, I just started doing some more on the lathe and mill and I really like it compare to aluminum and easyer to clean up. Oh ya it looks 100 times nicer when done.

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Did you photoetch that perforated aluminum yourself or is it a store-bought item? If aftermarket, I can see a lot of uses for that stuff.

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Would you believe me if I said I machined it...? ;)

I think it is sold by The Campbell Line for model railroading. It came loose in a lot I bought of odds and ends of modeling supplies, but it was with some other Campbell materials.

Interesting stuff to work with, very soft. Easy to file, easier to bend, not necessarily where you want it to bend.

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Since you can't solder it in place, are you going to machine some sheet metal screws? ;) ;)

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Since you can't solder it in place, are you going to machine some sheet metal screws? ;) ;)

They actually fit without any need for mechanical fixturing or adhesive when the seats and body panels are installed. Same for this piece...

Beginning of upper under hood framework. Snaps in since it will mounted after the engine is built and installed.

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That is some really nice engineering Mark. Looks like a nice tight fit. Sorry I missed it Friday. Got my final exam tomorrow and it promises to be a real bear!

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Thanks Pete, I need to make sure it can be unbuilt, painted and rebuilt, so the extra time and effort will hopefully pay off in the final assembly.

The foot wells are built. I was able to attach the passenger side to the transmission tunnel and still be able to snap it in and out of the frame easily.

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The driver’s side was a bit more work due to the provisions for the master cylinders and room for the pedals. It “loads” from the top and locks into part of the framework on the bottom of the car.

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This upper panel also locks in place.

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Some of the principle elements of the pedals assembly and the drivers side foot well.

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I still need to make the faces of the pedals, but I have the geometry set up.

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The guide for the steering shaft is installed in the foot box too.

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I started making the frame support work for the steering shaft.

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The cowl fit and attachment points have been finalized and I started roughing out the dashboard.

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All of these parts are friction fit/snap together.

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These are the U-joints for the steering shaft.

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Here is a dry fitting of them with the links of the shaft assembly.

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I still need to make pins for the cross-shafts

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Looks to me that if you're any bigger than a jockey you could never fit into this car.

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Looks to me that if you're any bigger than a jockey you could never fit into this car.

Even people over six feet tall can fit just fine. Don't forget the drivers side has more leg room than the passenger side.

Driveshaft is brass with aluminum bearing caps for the cross-shafts.

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The shifter boot was made by machining a mold from aluminum and casting it with the same pliable resin I used for the tires and other boots.

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The bezel was also machined from aluminum.

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It fits flush in the transmission tunnel.

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