Sanding tools?

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Sanding sticks are good for most things but I'm having difficulty sanding the ejector marks on the inside of a '39 Chevy cab. Has anyone invented a

home made tool for sanding in such closed locations? Any help would be appreciated.

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Posted · Report post

There is a device called a NiC sander available from,Pro Motorcar Products, used by the body shop guys.,available at most automotive paint stores. It is like a pen shaped instrument with an insert of fiberglass that can be adjusted out when it wears down,the bristles of fiberglass make short work of small sanding areas. without a lot of uneccesary damage. here is the website www.promotorcarproducts.com

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Posted · Report post

There is a device called a NiC sander available from,Pro Motorcar Products,

Holy COW! Gabriel you are a genius! I actually have one of these in a tool box Id gotten from my uncle when he went into a care facility, but I had no idea what it was. It worked out great.

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Posted · Report post

How do you use the thing?

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Posted · Report post

2012-12-28201635.jpg

Jim, the tip is abrasive. Effectively a sanding pen.

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Posted · Report post

Sanding sticks are good for most things but I'm having difficulty sanding the ejector marks on the inside of a '39 Chevy cab. Has anyone invented a

home made tool for sanding in such closed locations? Any help would be appreciated.

Rob,

I don't often smooth out ejector pin marks on the underside of roofs, but when I do, I like using well-worn pieces of Wet Or Dry sandpaper, and my index finger. This is one place where the "risk" of sanding a "dimple" into the plastic surface generally (in my experience anyway) isn't that much of a problem, given the concave shape of the inside of most model car body roofs.

By "well-worn" I mean sandpaper that has lost its original stiffness, so that when wet, it's actually quite limp, flexible. I simply place the sandpaper, with water, on the offending ejector pin point, and sand away, in a bit of a circular motion, stopping to check frequently to see if I've removed the raised portions of them, and adding a bit of putty if there is a recessed spot or two (not uncommon, BTW) and simply repeat the process until I have the surface I am looking for. It can be helpful to have a bit of 360-grit here, as that coarser grit removes offending material more quickly, and can easily be "polished" up with some 400-grit. Takes a bit of time generally, but I have gotten the smooth contours that I think you are seeking.

Sometimes, no special tools other than those on the ends of your fingers are all that it takes.

Art

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Posted · Report post

the first contractor i worked for (1970) told me the same thing.

of course, he had never seen the micro-mark catalog!

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Posted · Report post

Thanks Art. Good advice. It is also clear you are a much more patient man than I. :)

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