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AMT 57 Chevy Bel Air Review Needed

61 posts in this topic

Posted

.

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Posted (edited)

 I have one of the chopped glass units from an old kit; has anyone ever been able to use it and make it look good?

Great idea at a quick, first glance, and even with the understanding that it was an "advanced" technique, exactly how did the designers and engineers at think think would be successfully executed? Lots of near-perfect masking would be required, and that's after you cut the top apart perfectly to match the clear piece's sections. :unsure:

WP_20170209_005.jpg

AMT57CBEH9.jpg

Edited by Casey

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Posted

The chopping job above is something I would not like to tackle. I can't imagine too many kids in the 60's had the skills to build a decent looking model using the technique shown above. AMT's '53 Studebaker had a much better and easier way of achieving the same thing. After seeing the above instructions, I can see why AMT did not offer the option in later releases.

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Posted (edited)

... I can't imagine too many kids in the 60's had the skills to build a decent looking model using the technique shown above...

While that's undeniably true, and in spite of the endless harping on the opinion that these models were primarily intended for children, the truth is (and it's apparent to anyone who was around back then and read the model mags AND the big-car mags) that a LARGE part of the intended market was teens and young adults who had fully-developed eye-hand coordination and some manual skills.

The show-winners and feature cars in the model mags were invariably built by teens and adults. The real-car mags heavily promoted the hobby, and in case nobody here remembers, the introduction of Revell's 1/32 scale Ford pickup, '55 Buick, Ford convert, Chrysler and Caddy, was accompanied by a FEATURE article in Hot Rod explaining how these new models could stand in as a creative substitute for the building of full-scale cars (for those on budgets or without the space), and how they could be helpful for developing the skills that could eventually translate to their full-scale cousins. The instructions back in those days also called out the correct names of many parts (a largely forgotten practice today), and frankly, I learned a huge amount about real cars from building models.

Model cars were treated as a viable field of interest in real-car magazines like Car Craft, Rod & Custom, the afore-mentioned Hot Rod, and many others...and the accompanying advertising reflects that. "Kids", the pre-teen only-capable-of-making-gluebomb-messes crowd, were hardly the audience these things were intended for initially...but the marketing mavens who probably saw the potential for "toys" marketed to serious 1:1 car enthusiasts also probably determined there was still a larger potential market if models were also promoted as "toys".

Kits like Revells notoriously "fiddly" offerings (like the Challenger One, Ivo's Showboat, the Anglias and Ford A-models, and exquisite engine and chassis parts-packs among others...all of which I dearly love) were never intended for sticky-fingered "kids", nor were the kits with "advanced" customizing features like the multi-section roof chop shown here. But as the reality of the market played out, and as the toy end of the spectrum most likely produced far more income than the serious hobbyist end did, the inevitable dumbing-down of the product soon followed.

An interesting side note is that this didn't happen the same way in the model railroad world. The "toy train" folks went in a different direction than the "model train" guys, and though there was some slight overlap, the "model" train segment of the hobby was and still is the province of mostly adults (adults who tend to care about scale-fidelity, prototype practice and function, and overall quality of workmanship, both in the models they BUY and the models they BUILD). Model Railroader magazine is still being published, with content obviously aimed at people possessing skilled hands and minds, and has been published continuously since 1934.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Posted

"Produced from the original molds" seems a bit ambiguous, but I guess we'll find out exactly what's included soon enough. 

AMT1079PepperShaker.jpg

Im looking forward to it being released, mainly for the repop box art & new decal sheet. 

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Posted

I just hope Round2 has invested in some tool repair, along with restoring some parts. I like the sound of Two Chrome trees, and I hope it will have more than 6 tires. Notice that the flyer does not mention any added old parts, so the plastic may wind up being 90% of the last Boyd version. Time will tell.

But New Tires, New decals, and fresh white plastic will sell a great number of theses kits. I know I'll be in for a couple.

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Posted

While that's undeniably true, and in spite of the endless harping on the opinion that these models were primarily intended for children, the truth is (and it's apparent to anyone who was around back then and read the model mags AND the big-car mags) that a LARGE part of the intended market was teens and young adults who had fully-developed eye-hand coordination and some manual skills.

The show-winners and feature cars in the model mags were invariably built by teens and adults. The real-car mags heavily promoted the hobby, and in case nobody here remembers, the introduction of Revell's 1/32 scale Ford pickup, '55 Buick, Ford convert, Chrysler and Caddy, was accompanied by a FEATURE article in Hot Rod explaining how these new models could stand in as a creative substitute for the building of full-scale cars (for those on budgets or without the space), and how they could be helpful for developing the skills that could eventually translate to their full-scale cousins. The instructions back in those days also called out the correct names of many parts (a largely forgotten practice today), and frankly, I learned a huge amount about real cars from building models.

Model cars were treated as a viable field of interest in real-car magazines like Car Craft, Rod & Custom, the afore-mentioned Hot Rod, and many others...and the accompanying advertising reflects that. "Kids", the pre-teen only-capable-of-making-gluebomb-messes crowd, were hardly the audience these things were intended for initially...but the marketing mavens who probably saw the potential for "toys" marketed to serious 1:1 car enthusiasts also probably determined there was still a larger potential market if models were also promoted as "toys".

Kits like Revells notoriously "fiddly" offerings (like the Challenger One, Ivo's Showboat, the Anglias and Ford A-models, and exquisite engine and chassis parts-packs among others...all of which I dearly love) were never intended for sticky-fingered "kids", nor were the kits with "advanced" customizing features like the multi-section roof chop shown here. But as the reality of the market played out, and as the toy end of the spectrum most likely produced far more income than the serious hobbyist end did, the inevitable dumbing-down of the product soon followed.

An interesting side note is that this didn't happen the same way in the model railroad world. The "toy train" folks went in a different direction than the "model train" guys, and though there was some slight overlap, the "model" train segment of the hobby was and still is the province of mostly adults (adults who tend to care about scale-fidelity, prototype practice and function, and overall quality of workmanship, both in the models they BUY and the models they BUILD). Model Railroader magazine is still being published, with content obviously aimed at people possessing skilled hands and minds, and has been published continuously since 1934.

Bill, if I were close , I'd buy ya a lunch ! This is truly one of the most intelligent , well thought out and well presented posts here in I know this year !!!!!Thank you .

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Posted

I just hope Round2 has invested in some tool repair, along with restoring some parts. I like the sound of Two Chrome trees, and I hope it will have more than 6 tires. Notice that the flyer does not mention any added old parts, so the plastic may wind up being 90% of the last Boyd version. Time will tell.

But New Tires, New decals, and fresh white plastic will sell a great number of theses kits. I know I'll be in for a couple.

If their excellent work on the '53 Ford pick-up is any gauge, I think we'll be happy.

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IIRC I have an original Pepper Shaker in my stash....

Still covered with cellophane....

When the new one is released, maybe it's time to crack it open and do a comparison....

Pics to follow....

 

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IIRC I have an original Pepper Shaker in my stash....

Still covered with cellophane....

When the new one is released, maybe it's time to crack it open and do a comparison....

Pics to follow....

 

......Funny you mention your sealed original....many times I've been so tempted to grab a mint one on Ebay when they show, but for some strange but good reason I always passed,,,,and now with this reissue coming I'm glad I did, because I'll bet if you crack the cello on yours and do that comparison you speak of that the new kit will outweigh the oldie in many aspects,,,tires, decals, perfect chrome, and the tinted glass just to mention some factors.....regardless, it will be interesting to compare them both for certain.......the Ace..;)

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Posted

My prediction is it will be released with the same parts it had pre Boyd, with pad printed tires, extra set of the same glass tinted green and an expanded decal sheet. BTW, somewhere along the line the original clear tool was lost. Compare an old original to a newer Ertl kit and you can see the newer custom grill is not as thick and the head lights have no engraving. 

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