OK, a 1936,,,,,, WHAT ?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

For your viewing enjoyment , but what is it ?

I am thinking Oldsmobile or Pontiac or ?????

http://www.dump.com/assemblyline/

Edited by gtx6970

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Posted · Report post

Pretty sure that's a Chevy, 2 door sedan.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Yup, they are making Chevys.

Edited by Nitro Neil

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Posted · Report post

Yep... though the Olds, Buick and Chevy do look similar.

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Posted · Report post

Part of this longer 20+ minute film.

http://youtu.be/VvAH-Yskyio

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Posted · Report post

When you think of the complexity of that... the dozens of steps, hundreds of complex machines, thousands and thousands of pieces, everything working in synch, day in and day out... pretty amazing.

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Posted · Report post

Thought of this when I saw the post...this is unreal..

http://www.hotrod.com/featuredvehicles/hrdp_1303_couprageous_1937_ford_coupe/

hrdp-1303-04-couprageous-1937-ford-coupe

That's funny, I saw this car in person an a Billet proof show and was absolutely amazed by it. I had no idea what it was or the story behind it, but I can definately tell you it is incredible in real life.

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Posted · Report post

Lots of amazing things if you watch close. Automation we don't think about in the 1930's........but still lots of super boring manual labor done. Who here wants to lift the X member from the rack the the line about 1000 times every day!!!! I'd go crazy!!! It does show why were were the industrial giant of the world at one time. Only we did it that good in 1936.

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Posted · Report post

Lots of fingers probably got cut off, I bet.

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Posted · Report post

I've watched it a couple times and I am simply amazed by it. All of that was done without computer control.

Makes me wonder,,,,how?

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Posted · Report post

This is really an awesome video, thanks for posting. :)

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Posted · Report post

I've watched it a couple times and I am simply amazed by it. All of that was done without computer control.

Makes me wonder,,,,how?

We also used to be able to get in the car and find our way to where we wanted to go without a GPS having to tell us every move to make. Remember???

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Posted · Report post

I still know how to do that, and still don't know how to use a GPS.

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Posted · Report post

Same here. Never have used one. Never have needed it.

But once when I went downstate to visit my daughters... with my brother, him driving his car, he INSISTED we use his sparkly new GPS, even though I had driven the route literally dozens of times before. So I had to sit there while the GPS gave him the wrong directions and we wound up lost! :rolleyes:

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Cool video ! PBS last Monday night Had a program on Henry Ford from the beginning to the end of his life as well as his Son Edsel Ford. I walked away amazed what I learned about Mr Ford's life, work ethics to others and the assembly line process was taken from watching a slaughter house production line then applied to the manufacturing of the Automobile. It went into great detail about the UAW & how Chevrolet got its start as well as the Dodge Bros. A history tidbit about the founder of Chrysler motor company,

Walter Percy Chrysler came from Wamego, Kansas. Wamego KS is a sleepy N.E Kansas small town. His neighbors thought he was nuts from his disassembling of an automobile the reassembling it over & over.

Edited by Gramps2u

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Posted · Report post

Lots of fingers probably got cut off, I bet.

I was thinking that too, or at least a lot of cuts hands from all the sheetmetal handling, but then I noticed every stamping press has to be activated with two hands, even when there are two operators at one machine, so safety was taken into account.

How'd you like to be the guy whose job it was to swab lubricant on the stamping dies all day long? :huh: I can't imagine how deafening it must've been inside that factory, though, especially with that row of stamping presses going all at once.

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Posted · Report post

I was thinking that too, or at least a lot of cuts hands from all the sheetmetal handling, but then I noticed every stamping press has to be activated with two hands, even when there are two operators at one machine, so safety was taken into account.

How'd you like to be the guy whose job it was to swab lubricant on the stamping dies all day long? :huh: I can't imagine how deafening it must've been inside that factory, though, especially with that row of stamping presses going all at once.

Even the small air press I used to use to press in ball bearings at an old job had a two-hand switch. You had to press a button on each side of the machine, and at exactly the same time. Even if you tried to coordinate with another person to press the other button (a couple of us got bored one day and decided to try it), it was hard to sync up (maybe once for every 10 tries) due to different reaction times.

Most big presses like the ones shown have foot safety switches, too, you have to be standing on the foot pads when you press the buttons.

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Posted · Report post

Thanks for sharing the video. I really enjoyed watching how effecient they were even back in 1936 at building cars.

Now, if we could only get our model building down to the same precision.

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Posted · Report post

I am constantly fascinated by all the steps and people it takes to build a car but more fascinating is the design and placement of all the massive equipment it takes to create the cars. I have seen movies of how the Hoover dam and the Panama Canal were built too.

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Posted · Report post

Cool video ! PBS last Monday night Had a program on Henry Ford from the beginning to the end of his life as well as his Son Edsel Ford.

This video gave me a whole new impression of Henry Ford only not in a good way. The way he bullied his son Edsel was shameful. You never get this side of the story from most accounts. I was aware of his hatred of Unions however, and how he tried to fight them. I wasn't aware of he how he fired most of his top men and at the same time always taking credit for all their work as though it was his. Never knew he was such a raciest either. I lost a lot of respect for the man. :mellow:

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Posted · Report post

This video gave me a whole new impression of Henry Ford only not in a good way. The way he bullied his son Edsel was shameful. You never get this side of the story from most accounts. I was aware of his hatred of Unions however, and how he tried to fight them. I wasn't aware of he how he fired most of his top men and at the same time always taking credit for all their work as though it was his. Never knew he was such a raciest either. I lost a lot of respect for the man. :mellow:

Amen to that! I was absolutely shocked to say the least. :o

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Posted · Report post

Those who enjoyed the linked assembly line video might enjoy this 'site, too: http://theoldmotor.com/?cat=11

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