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Battery question

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Posted · Report post

i am very sorry for being a pain here with silly question , i see battery terminals on all the models and i have been searching and came across this photo -etched battery kit , what is photo-etched ??? again sorry for being a thread hog http://www.detailmaster.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Session_ID=1a7ba1c2bb4b0d66783f534b2923ab43&Screen=PROD&Store_Code=detailmaster&Product_Code=MCG-2192&Category_Code=

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Posted · Report post

Photo etch parts are tiny metal parts

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Posted (edited) · Report post

ah thanks , this is going to get more expensive than my guitar addiction :wacko:

Edited by CrazyGirl

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Posted · Report post

Photoetch can be a large step for someone starting out.as a beginner you may want to focus on detail painting first.

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Posted · Report post

Don't jump on PE parts. They are costly and sometimes hard to work with. I agree, should really focus on the detailing aspect. PE parts are pointless without precision details.

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Posted · Report post

photo etch parts are comparable to doing your own dental work. on yourself.

although i do have better luck than using bare metal foil. here's a quickie how it's done. http://modeltech.tripod.com/etchingarticle.htm

my main obstruction is that quite often the manufacturer of the photo etch doesn't include instructions, so the builder really has to think backwards of how the intended part would be broken down into components, and then try to find said component on the etch fret.

remember the 3 level chess set in star trek episodes? that's easy compared to photo etch assembly.

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Posted · Report post

I'm a beginner also well not really I've been in the model building game for years but just started getting serious about it the past couple. I agree whole heartedly with the others. Photoetched parts are useless unless you have the detail skills to back them up. I got some beautiful photoetched paets for a buick grand national from another user but I have put off building it. Because with my skills those parts would stick out like a sore thumb.

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Posted · Report post

Do not be afraid to play with them. I only know one way to learn. Go for it!

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Posted · Report post

Photo etch,,, dont drop there tiny micro parts,,they are real hard to find,, But they add great detail,,

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Posted · Report post

Take a look at the lady's thread on the workbench , she has skills . Aside from that , the only way you develop skills is to tackle the project at hand and be patient with it !

Anne , you can handle photoetch , trust me on this !

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Posted · Report post

I don't think PE battery terminals look very realistic - they are generally too flat. You should be able to make simple ones out of styrene that look better.

Some details - like bolt or screw details, are grey for PE.

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Posted · Report post

If you're good you can make terminals out of appropriate size solder wire. I flattened the very ends slightly of the solder and then drilled a hole just larger enough for the battery post to go through. The cable end had another tiny hole drilled in and then epoxied the wire into it.

Here's a pic showing this...............

PC090003-vi.jpg

This battery was from my stillborn '64 GTO WIP........the cable ends could stand to be a scooch shorter, but you get the idea. ;)

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Posted · Report post

Take a look at the lady's thread on the workbench , she has skills . Aside from that , the only way you develop skills is to tackle the project at hand and be patient with it !

Anne , you can handle photoetch , trust me on this !

I looked for the thread, all I found was a 55 Chevy, could not tell enough from that. However it is true that doing something like PE can make you better at it, and you should'nt be afraid to try. Anne could start off with a photoetched fan blade or a distributor kit. Anne could you post a picture of some of the Tools you have for doing photoetched.

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Posted · Report post

'40 Ford Sedan Stock Car ... First time building thread

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Posted · Report post

Seat belt buckles may be a fun place to start. Requires removal of part from the sprue and bending into proper shape. Lots of bang for the buck. And you get to make the belts too! :)

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Posted · Report post

If you're good you can make terminals out of appropriate size solder wire. I flattened the very ends slightly of the solder and then drilled a hole just larger enough for the battery post to go through. The cable end had another tiny hole drilled in and then epoxied the wire into it.

Here's a pic showing this...............

PC090003-vi.jpg

This battery was from my stillborn '64 GTO WIP........the cable ends could stand to be a scooch shorter, but you get the idea. ;)

Do you remember what size solder you used. Thats a great idea. I have been looking for a better way to make ends than using photoetch.

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Posted · Report post

I'd like to know what solder you used also

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Posted · Report post

Fellas, the solder I used was plain 'ol Radio Shack brand with a .062" thickness. Now that pic was taken 8-9 years ago when I was building the GTO, and some slightly smaller diameter solder might be available for use in this. The solder had a flux core which makes drilling the hole for your cable that much easier. Simply attach everything with some 5 min epoxy, and you should be good to go.

Since solder is very soft, you might want to give the terminals a coat of Elmer's glue to smooth out the "dings" from handling. When dry, simply paint the terminals silver to give an even appearance.

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Posted · Report post

Thank you.

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Posted · Report post

Fellas, the solder I used was plain 'ol Radio Shack brand with a .062" thickness. Now that pic was taken 8-9 years ago when I was building the GTO, and some slightly smaller diameter solder might be available for use in this. The solder had a flux core which makes drilling the hole for your cable that much easier. Simply attach everything with some 5 min epoxy, and you should be good to go.

Since solder is very soft, you might want to give the terminals a coat of Elmer's glue to smooth out the "dings" from handling. When dry, simply paint the terminals silver to give an even appearance.

Thank you for the great tip! B)

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