Scale Question

19 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

Am I not understanding something here , two corvettes , a 62 and a 67 , both 1/25 scale but the 62 looks so much larger and is almost a 1/4" wider than the 67 002-68_zpsc72abb22.jpg

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Posted · Report post

I'm no Corvette expert, but I'm guessing the real ones are the same.

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Posted · Report post

The simple explanation is . . . two different manufacturers . The new Revell body is a really nice piece but I think the MPC '67 body is probably correct .

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Posted · Report post

The accuracy of scale varies a lot from model to model. Some are correct, some others are way off.

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Posted · Report post

well what's funny is I had a 66 Corvette and a few friends had 60's and 62's and I don't recall them being much larger , or I guess I never paid attention, but looking at the two model bodies now it looks odd

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Posted · Report post

oh , both are Revell kits , the 67 is a 1997 build , and from what everyone says here that's the best year for them

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Posted · Report post

I checked the 1:1 Corvette specs and '62 is 70.4" ; '67 is 69.6". That's only a .032" difference in 1/25 scale. So it's in the kit maker's hands.

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Posted · Report post

wow Mike ,,, so what kit is more accurate ? the smaller 67 , or the larger 62

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Posted · Report post

wow Mike ,,, so what kit is more accurate ? the smaller 67 , or the larger 62

Get out the old digital calipers, measure both of them, divide your measurement by 25. Compare. There's your answer. :)

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Posted · Report post

wow Mike ,,, so what kit is more accurate ? the smaller 67 , or the larger 62

Yeah, Listen to Bill. I'm not exactly conversant on Corvettes .. I was in TR4's and Porsche's instead. :) I've never built a Corvette kit, so I'm worthless. Seeing you had both Vette's, that's MY idea of building, though! Building something you owned has become my mantra since coming back into the hobby.

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Posted · Report post

I was big into Triumphs about 30 years ago I had a collection of 5 or 6 , wish I still had them ...... measure them , oh the brain power that would suck up , at my age I need to save it for other things :lol:

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Posted · Report post

Interesting thread. I've been wondering similar ideas about the Revell Ferrari 420 and 458. They seem HUGE......

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Posted · Report post

I was big into Triumphs about 30 years ago I had a collection of 5 or 6 , wish I still had them ...... measure them , oh the brain power that would suck up , at my age I need to save it for other things :lol:

Talking about Triumphs, I had a 59 TR3, 72 TR6 and vintage raced a TR4. Stupid me I traded the 6 for a 356A coupe replica that I never finished.

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Posted · Report post

Actually, from what Art Anderson has said, and from observed practices in engineering and design (something I've had a little exposure to in my education and in various lives of work), 1/25 actually came first because the real car companies drawings were frequently done in 1/10 scale. To make scaling down simple and to have a size that worked well for the models, 1/25 scale (2-1/2 times smaller than 1/10) became standard because the mechanical pantographs scaled parts down conveniently to that size.

Monogram introduced 1/24 scale in the 1960s just to be different, and the foreign manufacturers decided to follow them for whatever reason.

For the record:

1/24 scale: 1/2"=1'0"

1/25 scale: 15/32"=1'0"

Charlie Larkin

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Posted · Report post

Speaking of Triumphs, my brother had a Spitfire that our dad and he swapped an old Mustang SVO turbo 4-banger into. It would spin the tires through 3rd gear. It was so scary of a ride my brother ended up pulling the motor and junking it (the body was pretty much gone anyway).

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Posted · Report post

My guess is that somewhere along the line Revell fudged something on one or both of those kits in spite of both supposedly being 1/25th. If you want to really blow your mind with a scale comparison, check AMT's new tool '57 Bel Air hardtop with their old tool kit of the same car, then with any of the 1/25th '55-'57 Chevies from Revell!

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Posted (edited) · Report post

The important thing is that the finished model "looks right". Both of those Corvettes will look just fine, even setting next to each other on a shelf..

My Triumph experance was working at a Triumph dealership from 72 to 74, and based on my experance with those cars I made the mistake of buying a 76 TR7. I had to buy a Hyundai 30 years later to get another car that bad.

Edited by Craig Irwin

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Posted · Report post

The important thing is that the finished model "looks right". Both of those Corvettes will look just fine, even setting next to each other on a shelf..

My Triumph experance was working at a Triumph dealership from 72 to 74, and based on my experance with those cars I made the mistake of buying a 76 TR7. I had to buy a Hyundai 30 years later to get another car that bad.

I had a 76 TR6 & a 77 TR7. The TR6 was the best car out of the two, mainly because I replaced all of the Prince of Darkness relays, switches & fuse box with Bosch parts. Never had a electrical problem after that. I still kick myself for selling that car. :(

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Posted · Report post

Personally, I think that 1/24 scale (as well as 1/12 scale) are the optimal sizes when you want to transfer dimensions between the model and a real vehicle (or vice versa), since the scaling is easy to do with a standard ruler.

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