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Dear AMT/ERTL

19 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

Why, in the name of God, did you mold the 1955 Chevy Stepside Street Machine model in dark purple?

I've put 3 coats of Tamiya fine surface white primer, and 2 coats of Tamiya racing white over it, and under the right light it STILL looks purple.

Time to buy another can of primer, and white...

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Posted · Report post

Here's a tip you. Primer first in silver. then do your main primer color, and then the color coats. the silver will seal the plastic from bleed through.

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Posted · Report post

Thank you for the tip.

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Posted · Report post

No problem I haven't tried it myself, but that has been posted over on another site by many people in the know.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

MrObsessive recommends a barrier coat of Future to seal reds, notorious for bleed through.

Molding the kit in purple was probably one of those decisions made A) to appeal to the market segment that won't ever paint a model anyway, or B) because someone's brother-in-law had a hopper car full of purple styrene pellets for a real steal of a price.

Here's a link to a discussion of the problem...ZoomZoom at the bottom is Bob Downie, a well known builder, and frequent contributor to model mags.

http://www.automotiveforums.com/t877996-bleeding_through_impossible_to_stop.html

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Wow, "AMT/Ertl" there's a name I haven't heard in a while... And purple plastic, yeah what were they thinking? Good thing the days of AMT/Ertl and Racing Champions/RC2 are long gone. Long live Round 2!!!

B-I-N sealer (available at home improvement stores) makes a good bleed-through stopper, but its spray nozzle sucks, so I decant it and thin it a little w/ Denatured Alcohol and airbrush it.

315c939a-1aab-4b32-8b91-130c085f44e9_300

Edited by Brett Barrow

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Posted · Report post

Silver as a barrier. Works 100% for me.

The color molded kits were for mass merchandisers like chain craft stores. Not for fringe like us.

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Posted · Report post

In addition to what both Dave and Junior mentioned , Let me pass on a tip I learned years ago . In the event you decide to do a car in a Vibrant White , ALWAYS undercoat it with a coat of Silver underneath . The end result WILL enhance White paint ................

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Posted · Report post

flat black also works great to seal colored plastic.

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Posted · Report post

The only color plastic I've had a problem with is red. I actually believe it has more to do with the white paint than it does with the red plastic. I was building a Monogram kit ('81 Turbo T/A) molded in red and I went over it with my normal Plasti Kote gray sandable primer. I really didn't care if the red bled through since I was planning on painting it red anyway. To my surprise, after the third coat of primer was on and dry, there was no hint of red at all! So, I thought hmmm change of plans. I then decided to paint it white with a red interior to make it really pop. I decided to sand the gray slick and shoot one good wet coat of PlastI Kote White and begin spraying my Tamiya Pure White. As soon as I began spraying the white primer, the red bled through! I think the white primer or paint draws the red out because there was absolutely no hint of red with the gray primer. I have a Monogram '56 T-Bird molded in red that I plan on doing some testing with.

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Posted · Report post

Molding the kit in purple was probably one of those decisions made A) to appeal to the market segment that won't ever paint a model anyway, or B) because someone's brother-in-law had a hopper car full of purple styrene pellets for a real steal of a price.

Ding Ding Ding Ding! Correct!

Some of the first and probably a lot of the second.

I used to work in a place that molded plastic. If you get a good deal on the pellets and the customer doesn't care.

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Posted · Report post

I forget which kit it was or the company that made it ( I want to say it was Revell, but I could be wrong ) but it was moulded in plastic that was multiple colours, sort of what your dog or cat would throw up. It was absolutely hideous looking.

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Posted · Report post

Why, in the name of God, did you mold the 1955 Chevy Stepside Street Machine model in dark purple?

Just out of curiosity, where did you find that kit molded in purple???? I've only seen it molded in gray or light tan.

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Posted · Report post

Were they all like that?

I'm thinking I had one when they first came out and it was that generic light gray color.

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Posted · Report post

Were they all like that?

I'm thinking I had one when they first came out and it was that generic light gray color.

The original ones were. A few years back they reissued it and it was molded in color- I think it came with a few pots of acrylic paint, a brush, and some non toxic glue as well. Not only was the plastic purple, it was also really brittle.

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Posted · Report post

The only color plastic I've had a problem with is red. I actually believe it has more to do with the white paint than it does with the red plastic. I was building a Monogram kit ('81 Turbo T/A) molded in red and I went over it with my normal Plasti Kote gray sandable primer. I really didn't care if the red bled through since I was planning on painting it red anyway. To my surprise, after the third coat of primer was on and dry, there was no hint of red at all! So, I thought hmmm change of plans. I then decided to paint it white with a red interior to make it really pop. I decided to sand the gray slick and shoot one good wet coat of PlastI Kote White and begin spraying my Tamiya Pure White. As soon as I began spraying the white primer, the red bled through! I think the white primer or paint draws the red out because there was absolutely no hint of red with the gray primer. I have a Monogram '56 T-Bird molded in red that I plan on doing some testing with.

Clear can do the same thing. Which is even worse as you think you've got away with it, blow on some clear and BANG it's a blotchy ('cause you've obviously used filler) pink gloss finish.

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Posted · Report post

The original ones were. A few years back they reissued it and it was molded in color- I think it came with a few pots of acrylic paint, a brush, and some non toxic glue as well. Not only was the plastic purple, it was also really brittle.

That's the one. I also remember the generic grey version, pretty sure I built it way back when.

Got this kit as a gift from my wife's cousin, he saw I was building models and he had it just sitting somewhere at his house.

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Posted · Report post

That's the one issue of that kit I never picked up. I didn't know that they did any of the kits from that series molded in color, I have both the LRE and the Scout from that line, both were molded in gray.

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Posted · Report post

Went to the LHS and picked up a new can of fine primer, some silver, and some more white.

Lets give it another shot!

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