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Porsche-martini

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Finally finished the decals after a day and a half of cutting and intense labor! Doubt that I am getting paid enough for this but the other two are easier so I guess it all evens out....

The suggestion of painting the base dark blue was a good one (another thread) and ultimately saved what little hair I have left.

I have to say that the decals are of the highest quality, which I have EVER worked with!!! Not to mention that they give you two sets of decals just incase you screw one up... which is highly probable.

The Fisher resin body was cast beautifully with very few flaws needing correcting and the directions thus far are very helpful (and slightly humorous)! This is a highly recommended kit.

P1011292-vi.jpg

This is what I started with....

P1011282-vi.jpg

By the way, that is the chassis next to the body in the first pic. The interior was a solid chunk of resin since this is a curbside kit so I vacuum formed a new one to give room for the slot car chassis.

More pictures as this project progresses.

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Posted · Report post

Jairus,

Very nicely done. Decals look like they went down nicely. That was the area I had problems with when I did that kit. How much carving out did you have to do to get the slot car chassis to fit? If I knew it was going to be a slot car, I would have said to charge more. (from another thread)

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Posted · Report post

How many martinis does it take to apply Martini decals? Nice work!

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Brendan, the chassis fits without having to cut anything away from the body. Since the sides are fairly thick...

P1011294-vi.jpg

... I simply screwed the body mounts directly into the resin with #2 screws. The chassis is manufactured by "Motor Modern", which is out of Germany. It is very precise and fully adjustable from 1/32 scale to 1/24th. The motor is a little anemic but people who want cars like this don't really want to go that fast....

P1011295-vi.jpg

Interior was the only major change from the kit. I used the kit interior and raised the floor slightly with evergreen sheet styrene. Then the front and rear of the "chassis" were removed. The interior was then used as a master and a new interior vacuformed over the old. It is thin... but once glued into the body and with the chassis installed... it's not going anywhere!

P1011296-vi.jpg

How many Martini's Bob? Just one.... one BIG one! The decals took 6 to 8 hours to apply over 3 days. Big secret was to cut them apart, apply one or two pieces with decal set and then GO AWAY! Over time the decal settles down very nicely. The body is about to receive about three or four coats of Tamiya clear which will be rubbed out to a glassy sheen.

P1011293-vi.jpg

:rolleyes:

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Posted · Report post

VERY nice! That decal job is flawless. And it still looks like a daunting and intimidating task.

Question: I don't know much about slot cars but it seems that's a heavyweight for a racer since it's a resin body. Is that an issue? Will it race or just "cruise" ?

Thanks,

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Posted · Report post

Nice work, but the 21 on the 'boot' looks a little cock eyed to me. :lol:

How long will you let the decals set up before you clearcoat them? Do you use a dehumidifier?

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Posted · Report post

Ismael, no just cruise! You would be suprised how heavy some of the older vintage cars actually were! A lot of guys would use weight to their advantage while building up the motor for more power. The greater weight keeps the car on the track!

James, No extra steps... just let it sit for a few days. Actually, I am building three of those cars (Ferrari 512 Lemans and a Ford GT 40) so with so much to do, the body has already sat for three days! :lol:

I realize that James was just kidding about the "cocked" number on the rear, as he knows good and well why this was done. However, there may be some on this forum who do not understand that this was done on purpose. This car ran at LeMans which was a 24 hour race! Back in the early 70's laps for the cars were counted by people who sat at a desk with a clipboard and pencil. Their job was to count the laps of the cars day and night. Many times the "lap counters" were the driver’s wives and girl friends, at least three persons all the time. The cocked number was for their benefit so they could see each cars number as the car went by. The side number flashed way too fast but the number on the back was in their vision for a longer period... and turned toward the lap counters stand at track side! Also, the rear numbers were always lit by little license plate lights during the night phase of each race.

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Ismael, no just cruise! You would be suprised how heavy some of the older vintage cars actually were! A lot of guys would use weight to their advantage while building up the motor for more power. The greater weight keeps the car on the track!

Interesting. Thanks! See? I told you I was ignorant on this subject :lol:

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Posted · Report post

Hey Jairus, pretty impresive decal job indeed!...Like you told, the secret for any hard decaling like this it's just to let the decals sit for a couple of days. Sometimes a hair dryer work too. I remember to had seen this fisher models in a slot track page in Japan.

Simón P. Rivera Torres

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