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Well I see I have a lot to learn. I was just going to ask what type if paint to use on a model car. I can see that people are very serious on detail here. I just built a model fire truck for my brother inlaw's memorial and had many problems trying to paint it. I used regular spray paint for the main parts but when I used the testors enamel paints I was unhappy with the results ie brush strokes and such. I guess my question is what will I need to use on my next project which I think will be 1956 Chevy Bel Air two tone model. Any advise will be much appreciated.

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Posted · Report post

You're going to get a million different answers, because there are a million different brands and types of paint out there, and everyone has their own favorite.

Since you're a beginner, I'd say keep it simple... you always have time to experiment down the road, but for a beginner to have the best chance of success I'd say try Tamiya sprays. I have also had good results with DupliColor automotive touch-up sprays (found at auto parts stores).

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Posted · Report post

Welcome to the forum.

Harry's advice on Tamiya paint is good. I like the TS line from them. Nice colors and it dries quick.

My second kit after returning to the hobby as an older adult was a '39 Chevy I tried in two tone paint and it bombed. My advice is to get a few more models under your belt before trying this. It requires some tips and tricks regarding types of masking tape and surface preparation.

Dale

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Posted · Report post

I used regular spray paint for the main parts but when I used the testors enamel paints I was unhappy with the results ie brush strokes and such.

For that very reason I don't brush paint anything. I don't use an air brush either, everything I do comes from spray cans. Whether you use Testors, Tamiya or Duplicolor auto paints, just take all those small parts, and mount them up for a quick spray. I like to use Styrofoam (from packaging) as bases, and I'll mount small parts onto toothpicks, or even lay down a loop of masking tape and lay the parts on it. No more brush strokes!

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Posted · Report post

Thanks everyone that replied so far. This could be a very be expensive hobby right? I do like a challenge though. How do we post pics of our models here would like some feedback so I won't make same mistakes again. Thanks Bruce

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Posted · Report post

This could be a very be expensive hobby right? I do like a challenge though.

A lot of what you buy initially will last a very long time. Buy decent tools and they'll last a life time. With paints, the first few models will get expensive, but the paint will stretch out over your model building for the next few years. I put a date on my cans and I have some that are a dozen years old and still work fine.

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Posted · Report post

I was surprised to notice that we don't really have a pinned section in Tips, Tricks and Tutorials about painting. A new thread like this will return a zillion different opinions, but here's a good place to start:

http://www.italianhorses.net/Tutorials/Primer/primer.htm

http://italianhorses.net/Tutorials/PerfectPaint/paint.htm

Many other excellent tips here:

http://www.italianhorses.net/Tutorials/tutorials.htm

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Posted · Report post

Considering the cost of some other hobbies it really isn't that bad. The initial outlay can be high but thats true of almost anything.

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Posted · Report post

Considering the cost of some other hobbies it really isn't that bad. The initial outlay can be high but thats true of almost anything.

Your first couple of kits can be a bit costly since you will need to acquire a bunch of supplies, different paints, glues, putties etc. But these will last a long time. I have paints that are a dozen years old that I'm still using. I have Evergreen plastic packs that are twenty years old, so those initial purchases will last a long time.

Tools are the same thing. You can start out with an eXacto knife and a nail file. I use 3M brand auto sandpapers, and buy the packs and cut down the sheets into little 2x2 squares. I have a half dozen grits, a pack of each, that have lasted me 10 years.

You can then add a tool per build. If you feel the need, you can buy a small drill set for $15 and a pin vise to work them for $5. A small set of files is also cheap. I don't use an airbrush or even a Dremel, I'm more of a spray can and hand tool kinda guy. You can get a panel scriber, flexi files, a good pair of photo etch sheers and other bits as you go along,

Some of my favorite tools... round toothpicks at $1 a box. I use them for applying glue, and holding parts to paint. I've even whittled small parts like arm rests out of them. I also keep a box of small Dixi bathroom cups handy. I spray paint into the for brushing and touch up. I sort parts in them, I turn them upside down, stab toothpicks through them to use as paint stands. A $3 investment for a year. I also am addicted to straight pins. I believe I bought a box a few years ago and still have plenty. I cut them to short lengths (with metal sheers from my garage) to use as assembly pegs. There's a lot of cheap stuff.

The hobby can be cheap or expensive depending on how deep you get into it and your available funding. It's easy to blow big money on mills and lathes, but that's a choice you can make way down the road. Good luck.

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