weathering

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Posted · Report post

this is related to my weld topic,same car...

I'm trying my hand at building a rat rod and weathering,one idea I found was to use chalk pastels

the other was buying a kit,ranging from 3 colors ($10) to many colors ($22 to $50)

I'm all about doing stuff on the cheap when possible,any input on this is greatly appreciated...

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Posted · Report post

Searching this site will give you more info on weathering than you can believe ... click this .. MCM Weathering topics

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Posted · Report post

Here's the set I use. I just sent you an eBay link to buy this same set for $5.

$T2eC16ZHJIUFHHOKNsUyBSJ+TldqQg~~60_57.J

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Posted · Report post

Hey bud. I go to a dollar store and buy the ladies eye shadow kits. A buck and you can get 8-12 colors. It is just like the chalks but in powder form.

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Posted · Report post

thanks again guys...

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Posted · Report post

Pastels are the way to go..

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Posted · Report post

Here's the set I use. I just sent you an eBay link to buy this same set for $5.

$T2eC16ZHJIUFHHOKNsUyBSJ+TldqQg~~60_57.J

Tom whats the link

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Posted · Report post

Tom whats the link

Brad- the link was for one set and I emailed it to Michael. Just search eBay for the same set. There's always a few of them there.

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Posted · Report post

The cheap pastels, do I need to clear coat after, or will it stick on enough to just leave it how it is?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

The cheap pastels, do I need to clear coat after, or will it stick on enough to just leave it how it is?

It depends on how you use them. In all cases, you will need to sand the stick down to create dust. I do that right in the plastic holder and let the dust sit under where the stick was. Some guys just take a dry brush and 'dust' the powder onto their model. Some then cover it, and others don't but complain that the chalk will wear in time with handling.

I have my own method. I call it the Two Brush Method. I take some Testors Dullcote from the spray can and spray it into a small cup. Then I paint a bit of it onto my model with a brush (call it the wet brush), then take the other brush (the dry brush) and dip it in the chalk dust and blot it into the wet Dullcote. You can also paint with the mixture as the chalk will melt in the Dullcote, so you can brush it for coverage, just be careful not to get brush strokes. This finish is strong enough to hold up without covering it. Sometimes I do though. You can continue to add dust on top of this to get some texture and depth. It's all a touch and feel thing that you will develop your own technique as you practice.

MVC007S-vi.jpg

Light weathering with the two brush method to represent a typical used car.

IMG_3266-vi.jpg

Heavy rusting with texture. This is done by repeat applications over the same area and pressing the dust into the wet Dullcote.

Edited by Tom Geiger

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Posted · Report post

Tom Geiger, that is some great work on weathering.

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Posted · Report post

It depends on how you use them. In all cases, you will need to sand the stick down to create dust. I do that right in the plastic holder and let the dust sit under where the stick was. Some guys just take a dry brush and 'dust' the powder onto their model. Some then cover it, and others don't but complain that the chalk will wear in time with handling.

I have my own method. I call it the Two Brush Method. I take some Testors Dullcote from the spray can and spray it into a small cup. Then I paint a bit of it onto my model with a brush (call it the wet brush), then take the other brush (the dry brush) and dip it in the chalk dust and blot it into the wet Dullcote. You can also paint with the mixture as the chalk will melt in the Dullcote, so you can brush it for coverage, just be careful not to get brush strokes. This finish is strong enough to hold up without covering it. Sometimes I do though. You can continue to add dust on top of this to get some texture and depth. It's all a touch and feel thing that you will develop your own technique as you practice.

Great info, thank you :)

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