Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

Panel Lines Tutorial


cruz

Recommended Posts

38 minutes ago, W Humble said:

I also use my pin vise to hold a sharpened bit of steel (baling?) wire, which has some advantages.  Being able to hold onto the tool very close to the tip seems to me to be helpful, but then I'm not as adroit with fine handwork as I once (think) I was!  On a 'custom' with lots of new scribes, perfection of curve, depth, and line sure help to 'sell' the re-design!  Wick

I have also used a pin vise with a drill bit mounted backwards in it.  The drill bit has the advantage of many sizes available, but a light touch is required because they are brittle (good use for already broken ones🙂). I find going around corners easier, as it is not as directional as the #11 blade.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Twenty plus years ago, when I first started scribing panel lines, I used the backside of the number eleven blade. The issues I had using it was, A. it was prone to slip. B. it was prone to making the panel lines wide/wider.

I later switched to using my razor saw. It worked much better. But, really tight rounded corners were a problem. Luckily, those were rare. I still use it to make new panel lines as it's easier for me to control.

I now use a dental pick that I modified with a Dremel and files. It works excellent! No wandering, no slips, no wider lines and tight corners are no problem. It will follow even the faintest line. I can scribe so many more things with it than I could with any of the previous tools. I don't think I could have scribed the gas door on this Mercury with anything else.

20210328_181623-1.jpg.edc3193b3c839c1889e77b1ec8b8b211.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, W Humble said:

I first bought the BMF line scriber, with the slight hook at the tip, and it worked best when it was relatively new. 

I was using the BMF scriber for some time prior to the #11 blade, but my main gripes with it were that it's far too wide for scribing deeply, (due to it's tapered shape), and it's way too slow for me.

I scribed "everything" on the '64 Bonny with a x-acto blade, including every piece of trim, (including the wheel well trim and front quarter badges) and yes, the fuel door too.

 

I was very impressed with the speed of the x-acto blade for scribing and cutting when I used it, (backwards of course) to cut out the hood on an extremely thick Johan 1961 Dodge body in about 15 minutes!

So quick and easy, that for the first time, I'm seriously thinking about opening the trunk lid and at least the driver's side door on that project.

One of those things that I just never did because it was just too much of a PITA!

 

image.jpeg.3871c429cf252cd9680e99875a0ea73a.jpeg

image.jpeg.d23101f485345994e1113d7bcd3ac721.jpeg

 

 

 

 

Steve

Edited by StevenGuthmiller
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Plowboy said:

I now use a dental pick that I modified with a Dremel and files

How did you modify the pick? I like the part about no wandering outside the panel lines. I'm comfortable scribing most panel lines but the more tightly radiused corners do pose a challenge for me at times. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom; don't mind me butting in.  I also tried the modified pick, but haven't gotten the cut-down point smooth enough; it is very sharp and does a good job of digging a trench (good for opening up doors, etc.) but like most tools, hard to control for consistent width.  And those very important corners; like I mentioned, a good metal template is required, and the only one I have is a brass book-mark (also had a likeness of Mark Twain) that has tight radii that I find very useable.  It's smallish, and hard to hold in place, tho.  I'd hoped to find a re-scriber that had some method (side flanges or ??) of controlling depth of cut.  I guess this process separates the men from the boys, huh?  Some beautiful examples posted -- wow!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, AMT68 said:

How did you modify the pick? I like the part about no wandering outside the panel lines. I'm comfortable scribing most panel lines but the more tightly radiused corners do pose a challenge for me at times. 

I just ground it down until it was almost as thin as a razor saw. Then I finished with a metal file. I have it so that it's the same thickness from the point to the first eighth inch or so. What I like about it best is that it will cut both directions. I can push or pull. I have a photo of it somewhere. I'll try to find it or take a new one. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Plowboy said:

I have it so that it's the same thickness from the point to the first eighth inch or so

Thanks Roger, there's no need to post a photo I can understand how to modify the pick from your description. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steven,

The JoHan '61 Dodge body: coincidentally, this kit was the last bod that I opened the hood on, and only a month ago!  I put it on a '60 Plymouth body that -- no kidding-- had been converted long ago to a '61 replica, to prove that only the 'front clip from Mars' of the Plymouth was the only thing keeping it from being a pretty car.  That front went back onto a '61 Dodge 2dr HT body, which I will present free to anyone who wants to build up a bizarre looking MoPar!.  (Photos soon).  And it sure is thick!! And brittle!  Wick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/17/2022 at 10:08 AM, afx said:

I cut the head off a straight pin and installed it in a mechanical pencil.  I find it easier to control than the back edge of an Exacto blade to scibe panel lines and body trim.

DSCN2148

Now THAT is innovation! :)

I'll have to try that. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My two cents: I only scribe panels that represent something that opens. All the others are filled on real cars and not that deep. I see models where panel lines, say, between the top of the trunk lid and back window, or the front fender caps are scribed as deeply as opening doors. Looks weird to me. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forgive me, I'm old.  If I posted this previously... well, I guess I posted it again! This is how I used the edge of the 'chrome strip' to allow me to draw a parallel scribed line on a faked '61 Plymouth (started out as a '60, you know, with the world champ fins?) using a pair of dividers from my high school mechanical drawing class days.  A bit of plastic rod in the pencil lead side, and the usual pokey-pin in it's usual place.  Worked first time out!  I'd built the horizontal edges with quarter-round strip, but what might have passed for an 'edge' that I could have used as boundary for the BMP was filled in with the prime coats.  Setting the guiding rod and the point about 1/16-in apart gave a decent line that I could improve with a scriber tool.    Sorry about pic quality; taken with my laptop cam.  Wick

WIN_20220915_14_49_30_Plodge trim scribe.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh heck!  PS: the trunk edge lines were done from 'scratch' (sorry for pun!) with various sharp thingies.  Does the old feller look like he's focused?? 

This is my Phantom Plodge, Plymouth with '61 Dodge front clip.  Photos soon!  Wick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Guys, the reason for your slips is simple, you have not started VERY LIGHTLY with the scriber. Again, the word VERY LIGHTLY is the magic here, I cannot stress it enough. Once that scriber forms that line, then you can continue with the blade with this one very lightly at the start as well.... 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a worn Iwata airbrush needle that is scary-sharp, also a modified crochet needle; my best is still the Micromark hooked one.  No scriber is perfect when going through styrene, then filler, and back again!  Agree about the light touch, and patience -- aaugh!  Still, a metal radius template is my most desired tool; an eraser guide has too much radius; corners look silly.  My go-to is still a PE brass bookmark of Mark Twain (not scribing his face, oc) but the tight-radii of the corners -- but it is small and hard to hold steady.  Did I post my drawing-conpass idea for following edges?  Wick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Not sure if someone brought this up before... I used to have a challenge with creating panel lines where there were none, but should be. By coincidence, I found that there is a product called scribing tape. It has the right balance between being strong enough to guide the scribing tool steadily and being flexible enough to allow for an (intended) slight curve. Plus it has very good adhesion so it can be used a second time in most cases.

This is the stuff. It comes in several dimensions. Works great for me.

https://www.migjimenez.com/en/home/5845-scribing-tape-straight-edge-5mm-x-3m--8432074082460.html

 

Edited by Tommy124
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...