Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

What adhesive for chopping up a diecast?

14 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

I have a crazy project idea for a customized diecast, but I have no idea what to use for putting it back together. What adhesive can hold it together and be strong enough to be handled during body work?

Thanks. Lee

Edited by LDO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

JB Weld.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

e75-5.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Have you guys used it for this? I know that stuff has gained (non-existant) super powers. I once read a post from a Ferrari owner asking if he could use JB to patch a hole in the transaxle of his Testarossa.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I have used it, but I like regular two part epoxy better. I use the 5 min stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Lee

for a temporary hold on the model you can use goop clear plumbing cement. just clamp or hold it in place a couple of minutes and you can continue on. you can just peel it off if you need to and start over with no mess at all. i actually use this on all of my models for both temporary and permanent holds. you can get it at home depot or Lowes for about $4.00 tube. blue tube usually in the paint dept. goop also makes clear craft glue which is the same thing just costs more.lol this stuff works on metal or plastic with the same results. this might not be for everyone but it works for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I've gotta chime in here, having had much professional experience with a wide range of adhesives.

First, you'll probably have pretty good luck with JB Weld if it's fresh, and mixed right (but entirely dependent on the area of the bond). I've used it successfully, on the road, to glue a fitting into a radiator on a car that HAD to go another several hundred miles. It was exposed to fairly high temperatures and a little pressure (16psi) and held for years. Thoroughly sand (180 grit) and than clean the area to be joined with 90% isopropyl alcohol for best results (which goes for any epoxy based product).

5 minute epoxy, in my experience, has almost zero strength, and it's really only good for temporary holding while a real adhesive is prepared.

If you want to actually glue diecast-potmetal together permanently, and have sufficient strength to do bodywork (and all the sometimes rough handling that implies), which I think is the actual question you're asking...the minimum you're going to need is model aircraft 30-minute epoxy, and you'll need to reinforce the joints inside with some fine fiberglass cloth.

In general, the LONGER any epoxy product takes to cure, the STRONGER it will be. AND, un-reinforced epoxy has very little shear-strength when used on a butt-joint, such as you get when chopping up a model. JB Weld can be disappointing if the bond area is small, as on a butt-joint.

I personally use a high-strength epoxy made for structural repairs on real aircraft, which I have access to for free after it's gone out of date (still works fine, but can't be used on aircraft). The longer-is-stronger relationship is why I recommend the 30-minute RC airplane stuff as a minimum. It's generally the strongest stuff you can get at the LHS...and it will have to be reinforced with some very fine glass cloth on the backsides of the joints if you really want to insure against disappointment.

I don't know about you, but nothing ruins my day faster than having a crack appear in finished bodywork.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Can styrene sheet be used as a seam backing instead of fiberglass?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Marine Tex ain't no slouch neither.

and JB Weld KWIK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

5 minute epoxy, in my experience, has almost zero strength, and it's really only good for temporary holding while a real adhesive is prepared.

I have been using 5 min for probably 15 years with good luck. I put the two halves of a diecast tractor together once and and realized the next day I forgot to put in the steering shaft. I broke the diecast trying to get it pried apart. This was a thin butt joint with no reinforcing.

Can styrene sheet be used as a seam backing instead of fiberglass?

I have used styrene with good results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

I agree with Bill Engwer. Overall I think JB Weld is best because it is strong, easy to get, and cheap. Sometimes I will drill holes into each piece being glued and pin them together before gluing. A little piece of piano wire is pretty strong!

5 minute epoxy is pretty useless.

Edited by Modelmartin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Forgive me if it's a real dumb question, but can these diecast bodies be soldered together? Or can it be used as filler like lead was on 1/1 car bodies?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Forgive me if it's a real dumb question, but can these diecast bodies be soldered together? Or can it be used as filler like lead was on 1/1 car bodies?

Not really. The diecast zinc alloy doesn't work very well soldering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0