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Ace-Garageguy

Alternate-Reality 1935 Allison-powered LSR car

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... Are you keeping the fenders separate from the body?

Those bulges are cool too - like mighty, bulging biceps.

The fender lines will stay as they are, but I really don't know how the rest of them will be resolved yet. The aero guys at the time knew that huge open fenders made huge drag, so some kind of closing in of the rears of the fronts will happen, but they'll probably remain separate from the main body.

I've always wanted to do something with hood bulges like the old Schneider Trophy airplanes, and this seemed the one to let loose on.

As an aside, the aircraft built for the Schneider Trophy competition in the 1920s and '30s rapidly advanced the understanding of aerodynamics and powered flight, with very reluctant government financial involvement. The Supermarine S6B, designed by Reggie Mitchell and the ultimate winner of the Trophy for England, was however the direct progenitor of the famous Spitfire fighter of WWII (also designed by Mitchell).

The Italian Macchi M.C.72, which was unable to compete in the final Schneider race in 1931 due to mechanical problems, went on to set the world speed record for piston-engine seaplanes in 1934, at 440 mph. The record still stands. 300px-Macchi_M.C.72.jpg

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Boy I wish that the Piaggio-Pegna PC.7 had gotten the chance to fly "in anger". That was a wild design.

Have you the bulges on the nose of Miss Ashley II? Beautiful plane. R.I.P., Gary Levitz.

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What a great project! Artillery-style wheels might look good. I seem to remember the Allison was supercharged to cope with high altitudes; I wonder how running at the Salt Flats would affect it.

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Thanks for all the interest and comments on this one, everybody. I was hoping to do something kinda quick that I wouldn't get bogged down with details on, but as usual...

I think in those "would it really work" terms too. My rationale is that German metallurgy, and steel in particular (big ol' Merc gears and axles) was really good back then, the big ol 'Mercs had gobs of torque AND weighed as much as 6000lbs...so with a gentle throttle foot and steady acceleration instead of dumping the clutch, the rear-end ought to take it. A LOT of early Ford-based cars ran really fast on the lakes that way, with notoriously weak rear-ends. B)

Glad your dad recovered and was able to fly again after that. To stretch the old saying a bit, any landing you live through is a good one. <_<

Thanks Bill! Your rationale makes sense, steel was a generally lot 'cleaner' in those days, and Mercs were built for strength!

If you're interested in some flying stuff check this link: wunjopress.com/anevilboy.htm

There is one surviving Macchi M.C.72, in the Italian Air Force museum near Rome.

Edited by DonW

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I love the period-esque look. Fairing in the wheels following the fender shapes would be slippery and sexy. I see airfoil shaped supports to attach them to the body.

This is really nice.

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Brilliant! Mind you, that Merc diff. is going to be struggling with all that power...

Rather off-topic, my Dad broke his back in a P-51 (powered by a Packard-built Merlin)during the war - he was coming in for a hot landing and banged the flaps down at around 150 mph - but only one of them came down and the Mustang flipped on it's back into the ground. We have picture of the wreck, lots of little pieces in the desert! He did fly fighters again after a few months in a body cast.

Back to the build - I for one can't wait to see more progress.

Did your dad recover eventually?

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Bill,

Here are a couple of inspirational drawings thought you'd like:

The CUC Caswell Track Nose

CUC_CaswellTrackNose.thumb.jpg.c6ca05b04

And, the Mayabb Lockhart Boattail

MayabbLockhartBoattail.thumb.jpg.2b50574

Keep us up to date on your beautiful build! -KK

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I remember this on from TRaK.  I'm stll looking forward to seeing this one finished.   If ytou want airplane style hood bulges, there's always the Golden Arrow, though it ran a W-12, hence the three bulges.  It also ran woth tanks full of ice instead of a radiator.

http://www.landspeedrecord.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/golden-arrow-henry-segrave.jpg

 

Malcolm Campell's 1933 Bluebird  which ran a v-12, and the bulges are a little smoother.

http://ginacampbellqso.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Daytone-1933-copy.jpg

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That Falcon has been known by a few names. Here's another pic referenced as the 'Thunderbowl Comet'. Check out how large it is compared to the folks standing behind it. 

ThunderbowlComet_700-700x484.jpg

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Malcolm Campell's 1933 Bluebird  which ran a v-12, and the bulges are a little smoother.

http://ginacampbellqso.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Daytone-1933-copy.jpg

Thanks for the inspiration,...

Next years Cannon Ball 2018 .....Inline 12..Maybe the Batplane as a base,...lol

Edited by Belugawrx
BULK QUOTE

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Yeah, a slightly split personality.

 

In reality, I've been kinda interested that in a lot of early race cars, driver comfort was the absolute last consideration. I wonder who figured out first that a comfortable driver could push a car a lot harder.

This is just before he became Lefty,...obviously...lol

I see alot of filler involved on this one Bill

Cheers

 

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This looks so cool, keep it going want to see more,

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Did your dad recover eventually?

Yes, he was flying again within several months and flew Spit 8s out in Burma in '44 then later was a test pilot for Rolls Royce amongst others, on Meteors, Canberras, Javelins and anything else he could get his hands on. 'Can I have a go in that, old boy?'!

He died some years back, in his mid eighties. If you're interested check out wunjopress.com/anevilboy.htm

Thanks for asking.

Now back to the topic - good to see this one again Bill!

Cheers,

-Don.

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