53 Chevy Bel Air paint question

9 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

DSCN3880-vi.jpg

Would like opinions please. I've had to strip it once since paint wouldn't lay correctly. I'm thinking about two tone; roof and Bel Air panel on rear fenders same colors. Would you paint roof and panel a non-metallic and rest of body metallic; or do you think it all should be the same finish? I'm thinking medium gray and black, or even primer gray and flat black with some flat clear. If you look, please post a response. Thanks for you opinions ahead of time.

Edited by o-man

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Posted · Report post

Black works with anything. I see no problem with the medium grey metallic and black. It sounds like a great choice.

I love satin colors and primer rods so your other ideas sound good too.

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Posted · Report post

Depends if you are going for a stock look or not. Look up real colors, I did mine in the factory blue and white, look for post under glass, shows picture of real car as well. THe blue had some metallic to it, not much, was Regatta Blue from Scale Finished and the white has not metallic at all.

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post-2871-0-43088000-1386367404_thumb.jp

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Posted · Report post

I think all your options mentioned will look fine. It might only cause pause if the top and panel were, say, flat and the rest glossy. That said, I rarely critique artistic choices because there's room for all interpretations.

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Posted · Report post

I'm thinking the factory two-tone Dusk and Driftwood Gray would be a nice combination.

http://www.tcpglobal.com/aclchip.aspx?image=1953-Chevrolet-pg01.jpg

Dusk Gray on the '52 chip set: http://www.tcpglobal.com/aclchip.aspx?image=1952-Chevrolet-pg01.jpg

Be sure to seal that red plastic thoroughly.

Uusually, I recommend silver paint over gray sealer-primer for the best results, as the paint will block the leeching colorant and not show too much discoloration. Top-coat that with white primer to be sure you're getting a good base color-wise to start with, given how light the Driftwood Gray is.

Charlie Larkin

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I'm thinking the factory two-tone Dusk and Driftwood Gray would be a nice combination.

http://www.tcpglobal.com/aclchip.aspx?image=1953-Chevrolet-pg01.jpg

Dusk Gray on the '52 chip set: http://www.tcpglobal.com/aclchip.aspx?image=1952-Chevrolet-pg01.jpg

Be sure to seal that red plastic thoroughly.

Uusually, I recommend silver paint over gray sealer-primer for the best results, as the paint will block the leeching colorant and not show too much discoloration. Top-coat that with white primer to be sure you're getting a good base color-wise to start with, given how light the Driftwood Gray is.

Charlie Larkin

Interesting, given that I've never had a primer "leach" its color into the finish (and I've been painting model cars for at least 54 years now. Part of the problem with color coats can be that they are mixed from a combination of pigments and "toners", the latter of which are transparent, very much like dyes, and can bleed at times into color coats (reds are, in my experience the worst offenders at this). True primers, on the other hand, generally don't have toners in them, the most common, red oxide, white, gray and black, are, I believe, all pigment, with no toners or dyes in them. Of course, whenever I use anything as a primer, it is that, just that: primer, made and packaged as such.

Now, with colored plastic, red being the prime offender, often times styrene gets "colored" with dyes, particularly reds and yellows, and those will bleed through most paints at times, although I have never had that experience (I dunno why--either I've been lucky, or the red plastic demons are scared of my disposition?) This situation does require a sealer of some sort or another, in order to prevent bleed-through.

Art

Edited by Art Anderson

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Posted · Report post

Actually, Art, I was referring to the colorant leaching out of the plastic, not the primer. I've tried the block-coat method and have had reasonable success with it. I brought it up as I noticed Oscar's car was molded in red.

Charlie Larkin

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Posted · Report post

Thanks guys for at least responding! Despite clearing body before painting, it did bleed through first paint job. Top picture, body has two or three coats of flat clear. Hit it with gray primer after that. Decided to go two tone gray. Body wasn't cleared when this picture was taken.

DSCN3942-vi.jpg

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Posted · Report post

Looking good so far, Oscar.

Charlie Larkin

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