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Plastheniker

1969 Mack F Daycab (AITM) with Flatbed Trailer - Plus Tutorial: Glazing Resin Cabs without Glue

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Jürgen... very nice tutorial. I'm sure the truck builders here appreciate al the time and effort you're putting into this.

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Thanks for this. This is such a big help for when I get a couple of aitm cabs. Cheers

Ben

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MORE MORE MORE!

Just curious.

I have used the glass that goes on the top part of microscope slides when doing model trains decades ago. Yes, cutting it is a pain with a high percentage breaking, but it is so thin and the effects were incredible. Obviously it limits you to flat glass and I have been rolling this around and the framing technique you describe makes it sound plausible.

Thank you so very much for sharing.

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i found by using the scratch protectors that you would put on your cell phone work great. they cut easy and are flexable. and with the rest of the hog wash, if we cant teach and learn from each other this hobby wouldnt be nearly as popular as it is. trust me , i will hack and cut any kit no matter the cost to fix its short comings, and explain why and how i did it....................keep up the great work. john

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that is very clear and good teachin jurgen

like the builds you have shown here

have several resin cabs of aitm so i look very close how to do this system , put now some machinery out tne closet [ i didnt know that i have it , was there al some yerars ]

and don,t forgett the dustmask! thank you meister

and can i see some work of you in jabbeke [ belgium ] in march?

i go to that truckmodeling show and contest

jacobus

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Hi Jürgen,

This is great, thank you so much for this and for taking the time to show us, I for one very much appreciate it...

Thank you again...

Andy...

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i found by using the scratch protectors that you would put on your cell phone work great. they cut easy and are flexable. and with the rest of the hog wash, if we cant teach and learn from each other this hobby wouldnt be nearly as popular as it is. trust me , i will hack and cut any kit no matter the cost to fix its short comings, and explain why and how i did it....................keep up the great work. john

John, I would really like to learn more about it. I will follow your next topics. Will we read more about it and see some results?

that is very clear and good teachin jurgen

like the builds you have shown here

have several resin cabs of aitm so i look very close how to do this system , put now some machinery out tne closet [ i didnt know that i have it , was there al some yerars ]

and don,t forgett the dustmask! thank you meister

and can i see some work of you in jabbeke [ belgium ] in march?

i go to that truckmodeling show and contest

jacobus

AITM uses an almost ideal resin. It is lightweight, easy to work and easy to glue.

On the other hand, however, it becomes extremely messy when you use a rotary tool. Without precautions you generate an incedible amount of tiny wheightless flakes that spread all over the room and adhere to everything (probably your lungs, too).

I use this simple and inexpensive device that sucks in 99% of the flakes:

From a 20 litre translucent plastic water canister I cut off the bottom third and dispose the rest. I cut a hole into the bottom of this canister third with the diameter of the tube of my vacuum cleaner. I fix the long side of the canister third onto my workbench provisionally with two clamps, insert the tube of the vacuum cleaner and put on a wide nozzle.

Run the vacuum cleaner at maximum power and almost no flake will leave the canister. If you feel the necessity use a mask additionally.

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Curved Windscreens

Curved windscreens imply a particular problem: Any kink or any undulation of the „glass“ will

distort all reflections dramatically and spoil the appearance of the model. Therefore it is indispensable to make the curvature of the windscreen opening as clean as possible when preparing the cab.

Prepare the cab as described in my first post. When removing resin around the windscreen with your rotary tool try to make the curvature as good as possible. Improve the curvature manually. Nevertheless the inner edges of the windscreen opening will be more or less a serpentine line.

Cut a copy of the „cardboard window pane“ from thicker cardboard that is just flexible enough to follow the general curvature of the windscreen opening (but not the unintended small ups and downs of the serpentine line).

From the inside lay a plane piece of thin styrene sheet (0.3mm or 0.5mm) onto the window opening (but do not glue it yet!). From the inside of the cab press the thick copy of the „cardboard window pane“ against the sheet. Fix the thick cardboard copy in this position provisionally but firmly. Now the styrene sheet should form a perfect curvature. Then glue sheet and fill the gaps between resin and sheet with super glue or plastic strips as usual. After drying restore the window opening and sand it flush. Now you should have a perfectly curved inner edge.

The moment of truth comes when you insert the clear window pane. Check very carefully if there are any distorted reflections. If this is the case do not hesitate to touch up the curvature.

Because the clear windscreen is cut from plane sheet its bottom edge (that is not fixed by a groove) refuses more or less to follow the curvature. Gluing this bottom edge into the curvature may be visible on the finished model – and this shall be avoided by my technique.

As you probably recognized on my pictures I use the same order of assembly that we know from most styrene kits: I insert a sub-assembly (cab floor + interior lininings below the windows + fire wall + dashboard) into the glazed cab.

Simply make the windscreen edge of the dashboard follow the curvature so snugly that it presses the bottom of the clear windscreen into the curvature.

Good luck!

***

Besides the Mack F and the GMC 9500 I used the technique on these models already shown in the MCM forum:

All windows

1937 Mercedes-Benz L 10000 Scratchbuilt 1/24

http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=75830

Scratch Built 1951 Büssing 12000 U13 6x4 Underfloor Engine Truck

http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=82042

1937 Bugatti Atlantic 57 S - Mother of all Sports Cars?

http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=80287

Side and rear windows

1950 Krupp Titan with Hanomag Trailer

http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=79775

1941 Chevrolet AK Pickup

http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=80531

Dodge L-700 with short flatbed trailer

http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=81522

Edited by Plastheniker

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I started the glazing tutorial announced in this topic in post #42 using a semi-finished AITM Mack W-71 cab and coloured paper instead of clear sheet for better visibility on the pictures.

I am going to show the meanwhile finished model soon in a topic that will be called

1953 Mack W-71 Integral Sleeper (AITM) & Canvas Top Trailer (Scratch Built).

If you followed the glazing tutorial an assessment of the final result will then be possible.

So if you are interested please keep the upcoming topic in mind.

Thanks!

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Gentlemen thanks for the info: I'm didn't have a lot of experience on built a model truck and I really appreciate your help about how to work on resin. I have a few Macks and a Broadway to built in the future but it seems that I need to work on scratch build first ( interiors) and then work on the cabs and they aren't pretty and needs a lot of work! That's a great built I love it!!!

Jesus

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Very nice model. And a great tutoral on making the windows. Thanks Jurgen!

Be Well

Gator

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Jurgen: I agree with your criticisms. And I don't find them offensive. In order to achieve good results sometimes a lot of adjustment needs to be done and it does a dis-service to the modeling community not to point out shortcomings when it will help someone else avoid difficulties.

Good looking models are the result of study and reflection of the real thing and the application of building techniques that will enhance the quality of what you start with so you can achieve the look of the real thing in miniature.

The fact that some AITM castings are heavy in no way is a negative criticism. Look at what we would all be missing if companies like AITM did not exist! We still might be just building out of the box.

We all learn from personal experience and the trials and errors of others who sometimes have solved the same problems we are dealing with.

Keep up the good work Jurgen. I enjoy your work.

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Your builds are Excellent!! Thanks for the tip on the windows. I used a somewhat similar technique on my Bighorn.

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Sorry, Anthony, but I completely disagree with your views on this. Pointing out problems with a model, whether an injection-molded kit or an aftermarket resin kit, is an inherent part of a model building forum.

I don't think Jürgen was listing the model's shortcomings in order to promote himself. His talents as a modeler are obvious and he has no need to blow his own horn. His work speaks for itself. He was merely commenting on the kit in an effort to inform others who may have an interest in building this particular model what they can expect.

If we can't be honest here about a model's shortcomings, then the whole point of a forum is lost.

just saying its good to say something about the short comings of a model do to the fact the a manufacture may look at forms such as this to see if they can make the product better think about it

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Thank you for the window tutorial :) It's always a pleasure to view your builds!

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I really like that one! Very nice work!!

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Thanks for the recent comments!

Jurgen: I agree with your criticisms. And I don't find them offensive. In order to achieve good results sometimes a lot of adjustment needs to be done and it does a dis-service to the modeling community not to point out shortcomings when it will help someone else avoid difficulties.
Good looking models are the result of study and reflection of the real thing and the application of building techniques that will enhance the quality of what you start with so you can achieve the look of the real thing in miniature.
The fact that some AITM castings are heavy in no way is a negative criticism. Look at what we would all be missing if companies like AITM did not exist! We still might be just building out of the box.
We all learn from personal experience and the trials and errors of others who sometimes have solved the same problems we are dealing with.
Keep up the good work Jurgen. I enjoy your work.

just saying its good to say something about the short comings of a model do to the fact the a manufacture may look at forms such as this to see if they can make the product better think about it

Total consent!

IMO one of the main benefits of modeling forums is information free from any commercial interest.

What is it good for when a modeler buys any modeling product whose shortcomings exceed his (present) abilities?

The modeler is annoyed because his money is lost. Very probably he will buy a product of the same manufacturer never again, but he certainly will tell his fellow modelers about his disappointment.

In the long run this will also damage the manufacturer's reputation and bussiness.

Ultimately honest information is useful for the modeler as well as for the manufacturer.

I think Steven hits the nail.

Formerly the LHS collected modelers' praise and criticism and gave this feedback to the manufacturers.

Since LHS are disappearing more and more, forums are the free source for manufactures to know what modelers think about their products and which shortcomings should be eliminated.

Experience shows that all manufacturers who ignored the shortcomings of their products failed sooner or later.

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Very nice model, and thanks for showing your method of making the windows with a great explanation and pictures.

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Thanks for the recent comments!

Total consent!

IMO one of the main benefits of modeling forums is information free from any commercial interest.

What is it good for when a modeler buys any modeling product whose shortcomings exceed his (present) abilities?

The modeler is annoyed because his money is lost. Very probably he will buy a product of the same manufacturer never again, but he certainly will tell his fellow modelers about his disappointment.

In the long run this will also damage the manufacturer's reputation and bussiness.

Ultimately honest information is useful for the modeler as well as for the manufacturer.

I think Steven hits the nail.

Formerly the LHS collected modelers' praise and criticism and gave this feedback to the manufacturers.

Since LHS are disappearing more and more, forums are the free source for manufactures to know what modelers think about their products and which shortcomings should be eliminated.

Experience shows that all manufacturers who ignored the shortcomings of their products failed sooner or later.

i agree completely i have an academy 1/35 scale m1a1 abrams tank that when i opened it i saw it was above what iam able to to right know so for the time being it is going to sit but i will build it on day

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