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1948 Ford flathead wiring

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I'm loving the quality of parts in the Monogram 48 Ford Woody kit. But I'm real hesitant to start drilling the "crab style" distributor. Any tips on how to wire this up?

Thanks!

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It would be helpful if you had a picture of the engine, I am familiar with the flathead Ford and the Aftermarket Crab style distributor, But not the specific one that is in the 48 Woody

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For starters, the ignition wiring of a stock 1932-48 Ford V8 is probably the simplest there is, as it's truly not necessary to be concerned about the firing order! The reason for this is that the plug leads are all "sorted" out underneath the rather large, "two-eared" dust cover--the 4 plug leads for the right side cylinder bank all coming out of the right hand "branch" dust cover, and the wires for the left cylinder bank exiting the left "branch". From their respective branches, the wires are bundled, 4 wires to each cylinder head, inside a curved, tubular steel "conduit", each wire exiting this conduit ajacent to its respective spark plug.

Here's the layout, so you can see:

Flathead_Distributor_1945to48-vi.jpg

Note:

"How did I find this drawing"? Simple! I used Google Chrome for the browser, went to Google Advanced Search, typed in "1948 Ford V8 Distributor", went to the next page, and clicked on "images" at the top of the search page. Just a couple of rows of pics down the page turned up this exploded view drawing!

Google Advanced Search has become my "go to" for finding reference information, easy to use, and as quick as any other method of research I've ever used.

Art

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Thanks! My Google search showed a couple of actual engines that had the crab style distributor. But the model kit really looks like it only has the dust cover. Not sure it's worth it to try and wire this one.

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Thanks! My Google search showed a couple of actual engines that had the crab style distributor. But the model kit really looks like it only has the dust cover. Not sure it's worth it to try and wire this one.

Actually, doing the plug wires on a '48 Ford V8 should be quite easy, as well as adding a real detailing dimension to the engine. Consider that the only truly visible plug leads are the portions that extend from holes in the sides and ends of the conduits, and arching up and over to the top of each plug. As for the conduit, that doesn't even need to be hollow--I'd consider 1/16" Evergreen Styrene rod stock for that, just bent to shape, and drilled to accept the plug wires.

Art

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Thanks. I think I'll give it a shot.

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This is a "crab style" cap (cause it looks like a crab!!)maa-221a_w.jpgThe one Art shows is not.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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And there lies the problem. The distributor in the kit is rather simple looking. I could drill holes in the sides, but there's not a lot of wiggle room there.

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I've got that kit on the shelf in the studio. I'll look at it in the morning and get back to you. :)

PS. I build real period-hot-rods for a living, so I promise to give you correct information.

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This is a "crab style" cap (cause it looks like a crab!!)maa-221a_w.jpgThe one Art shows is not.

and, the distributor in the Revell '48 Woodie that I checked to see what it had, isn't an aftermarket "crab style" either--rather it is the last series Ford "one cap" design, which is what is in the drawing I posted earlier.

In the bottom line, I suppose it all comes down to whether one wants to build a factory stock engine, or a flathead with a bit of "warming up"?

Art

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I'm not so much into having to build a certain correct style. I just like this model, like the way the paint turned out, and I want to build it as nice as I can

post-10106-0-31159300-1396697039_thumb.j

post-10106-0-48363200-1396697011_thumb.j

Thanks for your input!

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I looked in the box last night, and Art is correct in that the distributor cap represented in this kit is not the "crab" style you mentioned in the opening post, but rather a simplified version of the style the drawing shows in Art's post #3, as part #12105, more or less.

The wire loom assembly, part #12280, is not represented with the kit-supplied parts, and that's what you'll have to scratch build if you want a stock appearance.

This is about what you should end up with. 1948_Ford_V8.JPG

The wiring loom assemblies are light-gage steel tubes with the plug wires running inside. The ends of the tubes are connected to the distributor cap with flexible rubber sections, as shown in the photo immediately above.

IMG00090-20110302-2128.jpg

The easiest way to represent this on a model is to make the "tubes" out of approximately .050" styrene rod, bent to shape. Use about .013" wire to represent the actual plug wires, and use a pin-vise with about a .015" drill bit to drill your "tubes" in appropriate places for the "plug wires" to come out.

Photos taken from open internet sources, reproduced here under the "fair use" definition in copyright law.

SIDE NOTE: As these cars were serviced over time, a lot of the steel wiring loom tubes got left off because lazy mechanics or shade-tree guys thought they were too much trouble to mess with. Also, as hotter ignition systems were substituted for more performance, having the plug wires so close to each other inside the looms was found to be a source of mis-firing, as a current could be induced in the WRONG wire by one adjacent to it, leading to popping out the carb or backfiring as well.

The point is, if your model represents an older car that's been in service for a while, you can wire it more conventionally and still be right. You would have to cut the tabs off the ears on the kit distributor, and drill each ear with a hole to accommodate your plug wires coming out, 4 on each side.

hrdp_9812_05_o%2Bmike_partis_1927_ford_m

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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It would be helpful if you had a picture of the engine, I am familiar with the flathead Ford and the Aftermarket Crab style distributor, But not the specific one that is in the 48 Woody

Yeah, Just Go with what Bill& Art say.

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Thanks! You guys have been a great help!

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Hello, all. Just wanted to show you what I ended up with.

I took one of the wires used to secure models to the base of some acrylic showcases, and pulled most of the hard wire out from its sheathing. Then I inserted plug wires into some holes I drilled. I painted some of the sheathing white to simulate the plugs.

Thanks again for your help!

post-10106-0-58685100-1397474354_thumb.j

post-10106-0-91356300-1397474379_thumb.j

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