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fractalign

1935 Ford "Dearborn" C.O.E ,Bogie Drive Car Hauler.

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Hey Guys.

I was trawling through google images a few weeks back looking for a new project and I came across this. I Have always had a soft spot for early trucks, pre war mostly and I wanted to do a build that stood out from the rest. I have also been lucky enough to own a few full size ones in my time although they were little more than gutted shells I was able to get measurements and ideas for future builds.

While I like the later trucks I figured it was time to get an early build started, one with a difference. This is a 1935 Ford COE, as far as I know these were the first of the Ford COE trucks, correct me if I am wrong ! These came in a number of configurations from a 112 inch wheel base right up to about 157 inches.

Anyway here is the concept, as I stated previously this will be one with a difference. The truck will basically look like the one in the image below, only with a longer chassis and a tandem drive rear end, possible a Timkin set up.

Here is where it gets interesting though, it won't just be one truck, but three. The main truck will be a semi with a trailer. On the trailer there will be two more, one will be another COE and the other will be a conventional version, all 35 Fords. I have seen various images of trucks carrying trucks and I thought it would be a cool project to kick off. The truck in the colour image below this one is appears to have a different trim on the hood, its flat, I actually prefer the beak shaped trim on the first one which is why it will be the lead truck.

35COE_zps5a74c361.jpgP8043032_zps7c223d0d.jpgP8043032_zps7c223d0d.jpg

Edited by fractalign

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The hardest thing with a build like this is finding the correct wheels. After trying to track down resin versions, no luck and scratch building my own, no good, I bit the bullet and got a Unique Replicas Die cast 124 : scale 1934 BB Ford Truck. It was a less than accurate model. The lugs on the die cast wheels were off centre of the holes so these could not be used for this build. The tyres were also wrong, the tread was too far apart and chunky. I moulded the wheel, sanded down the lugs and drilled new holes for the lugs evenly spaced either side of the rim holes, I also reshaped the rim holes at the corners so that they were more rounded. The tyres I am using are from the MPC 1933 Chrysler roadster. You can see the difference between the die cast wheel and my version.

The fenders arches have been enlarged to take the larger wheel and the cab is in the process of being transformed around the wind screen area, I should add that this is not the cab I will be using for the COE truck, this one will be for the conventional truck on the back.

The other cab still has the paint and decals on it that need to be removed. I will be using this cab as a guide to build the lower part of the cab for the other one and once that is done I will start to work on it as well.

P8043049_zpsc26a3f3c.jpg

P8043040_zpsc55244bb.jpg

Edited by fractalign

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The chassis has been cut through and the running boards shortened. That section at the back is not the chassis I will be using but a left over part from another build. I will break it up and use it for the chassis for this one. The grill from the other kit is being converted into the 35 version because I figured that if i wrecked this one I would still have the good one to fall back on. I will be using fine plastic tubing to make up the mesh. To keep the tubing evenly spaced I will be using a running board from the Monogram 37 Tudor kit as a jig. The lengths of tubing will be taped into the grooves and the ends will have a balsa wood cross beam to hold them together.

P8043042_zps9b55af01.jpg

Edited by fractalign

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The first rail has been shaped and will be ready to attach to the front half once the other side has been created. The chassis next to it is from a 1932 BB Ford, I am using this chassis a guide for the lay out of the cross members for this one. The BB chassis will also double as a jig for when I put this one together.

Next task will be continue working on the cab, namely the lower part that will give it the height.

P8043046_zps2126f292.jpg

Edited by fractalign

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What a cool project. It looks like your determined to have all of the details right, and have the knowledge to do that. Ill be watching this one

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These cab-overs from the 30's are SO cool, but they look really gawky and "top heavy", but you won't find too many around, for sure!

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This is an interesting build...looking good so far!

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An interesting old rig that is for sure. I did a '38 COE and found that the Yat Ming tires and wheels were good for the year I was doing. The wheels were dead on. Nice to see others doing some scratch building! A suggestion if I may. Try using some "chrome" plated wire (doesn't have to be if you are painting the grill) for the vertical grill bars. They seem to work better for that rather than using the plastic rods. Less "fuzz" and a little finer. Great work and I will be watching your progress!

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post-10426-0-92923800-1407190843_thumb.jRobert i think you did a great job on the wheels, but have you checked modelhaus? the offer early 2 ton truck wheels, it may not be what you are looking for but i thought i'd throw it out there for ya!

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I LOVE working trucks, COEs, and anything oddball. This is a wild one...I've never seen that configuration before. Great project, sir.

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Thanks for the feedback guys.

The plastic tubing I am using is perfect for the grill as its just the right size. Modelhaus does some fine wheels but unfortunately the truck wheels are actually slightly different to the ones I am using. But any advice and feedback is more than welcome.

Cheers.

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Those aren't Ford factory jobs- Ford did not produce COEs themselves until 1938. The trucks in those pictures appear to be conversions by a company called Dearborn, though there were other companies which did the conversions as well. At any rate, I'll be keeping an eye on this one!

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Hey Guys.

As Chuck so rightly pointed out these COE's were conversions by a company called Dearborn. I also found another image to use for my build.

The truck in the image was shortened to 112 inches. This profile view enabled me gain the much need proportions for my build. The rear of the door appears to line up with the front edge of the running board. Based on that observation I was able to work out where mine would need to moved.

P8053057_zpsed3f54a9.jpg

Edited by fractalign

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The first task was to build a balsa wood frame to keep the cab square. As you can see the balsa wood cross beam is in line with the front edge of the running board. This is also where the rear edge of the door will be.

P8053059_zps72dd3de9.jpg

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The rest of the frame was built inside the cab with two more lengths of balsa wood attached vertically to the bottom of the cab at the rear door edges.These are the pillars and the bottoms were tapered to match the flow of the fenders. Between these pillars another cross beam was attached. The purpose of the this cross beam was to sit in front of the beam attached to the fender assembly.

P8053062_zps1fe6432c.jpgP8053061_zpsca9f8c84.jpg

Edited by fractalign

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With cab sitting properly the cross beams were glued together to secure the cab and i was able to focus on the next task. The other purpose of the balsa wood frame is a buck for the lower part of the cab. The sides of the balsa wood pillars were narrowed to allow the template to sit flush with the bottom of the cab, it was then traced ready for cutting. The upper part was easy but the lower edge was a real challenge.

P8053065_zpsde7fc9f7.jpg

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The result is a little rough but I am not too worried as I will probably be lowering the cab slightly so the bottom edge will be free of any gaps when I do.

P8053067_zpse6bea562.jpg

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With the sides done, I turned my attention to the rear. The most obvious solution to the rear panel would have been to cut up the spare cab but since the spare one is the one I will be using in place of this one that was not an option. I had an old resin cab lying around that was gathering dust so I sliced through the rear and readied it for its new home. Checking the fit and it was pretty close.

P8053068_zps16e46a9e.jpg

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The next task was to get it to line up and sit flush with the top of the running boards. To do this a rectangular section need to be removed so I got the panel and held it up to the bottom edge of the spare cab and traced around the bottom edge of the spare cab onto the new panel.

P8053069_zps0d8c6cf8.jpg

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With that done I proceeded to remove the section but i did not discard it because the top of the panel would need to replicate the bottom edge of the cab. I attached the section to the top of the panel.

P8053071_zps3a1c2710.jpg

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The final image shows the cab on the other side. The reason this side panel is not flush is because I have not trimmed the rear edge or curved it. Once I do this I will be able to assemble the sides top the rear panel. The next task will be to do this and move onto the front of the panel.

P8053070_zpsbad76178.jpg

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Hey Guys.

Just a quick update. I have not had much time to work on the truck because I have been caught up with a scratch building project on the automotive workbench forum. Anyway I am really keen to get back into this one so I made a few decisions to kick the project along. One thing I have decided is that I do not want to scratch build a chassis for this one. The image shows the BB chassis sitting under the truck and this will do fine. Since most of this chassis is scratch built it will make sense to finish it off and get a few cast for this project. If you look carefully you will notice the area behind the cab that has been marked for removal. That is the floor that I will use for the conventional truck, I will most likely combine this floor with the one in the interior to make a single unit.

P8083115_zps09cd0377.jpg

Edited by fractalign

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As far as the interior goes, its a little basic. It ok but not really to my liking. The first thing that will have to go is the bench seat. The Ford trucks of the thirties had the petrol tank below the seat and to make access easer to tank the base of the seat was split into two sections.

P8083117_zpsa019448b.jpg

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