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Putty suggestions.


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I have only tried Tamiya and i`m not very pleased with it,maby i use it wrong,not sure. Find it to sink

way to much,also it`s like it does not go completely rock hard. I usually wait 24 hours before working

on it. So it`s really annoying when tiny little bits fall off on edges,even with a very thin layer.

Is there any putty who are easy to shape,but also dont dry too fast and go rock hard?

Any suggestions are welcome,but it would be best for me if it maby is avaliable on Ebay

or other online hobbyshops who do ship worldwide.

Tommy

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This 2-part (you have to mix it, but it's not difficult) putty is becoming the standard among many more experienced builders. Amazon stocks it, and does ship to Norway (but check if this particular item can ship to you).

http://www.amazon.com/Bondo-801-Professional-Glazing-Putty/dp/B004BYKICG

It's also available from ebay UK for more money...

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Bondo-Professional-Glazing-Spot-Putty-801-3-0-oz-BND-801-BRAND-NEW-/121141705353

Edited by Ace-Garageguy
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I've never looked beyond Humbrol modelling putty for smoothing scratches, dings etc, and adhesion to plastic, and Milliput 2-part white "superfine" for building up larger volumes. Squadron white and and green are coarse-grained compared to the Humbrol. Revell Plasto seems to be much the same as Humbrol, but the latter is easier to find near me...

bestest,

M.

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3M makes several 2-part polyester finishing-glaze products similar to the Bondo product I suggested. The problem is that the size of the containers from 3M will give you more filler that you'll likely be able to use before it goes bad...unless you do a LOT of model building.

Your local full-scale car body-shop supply should be able to recommend something to you, maybe in a smaller package.

3M also makes a 1-part glazing putty, but all it is is thick lacquer primer, basically the same as the model-specific putties, and it will have the same problems they do.

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I guess it depends on what you want it for. IMHO 2-part 1:1 auto body filler is a sledgehammer to crack a nut for filling the odd sink mark and seam on a plastic car kit. I agree that the Tamiya isn't great (which is unusual for Tamiya tools and accessories) -- I have a variety of Tamiya filler products, and the regular plastic filler is just way too thin and "sloppy", so it's no surprise it shrinks a lot as it dries. Their UV curing "putty" is probably for RC models, since it's slightly soft and very resilient when cured, but no good for sanding, and the two-part epoxy putty is OK, but no better than Milliput or Citadel/Games Workshop.

I've never had issues with shrinkage using Humbrol filler (let's face it, you'll almost certainly have to do any serious filling twice -- once on bare plastic, and again after you've primered, sanded back and spotted where it isn't pristine).

I tend to use filler for sink marks and ejector pin dings, but if I want a seam to disappear (and I do this on aircraft in bare metal finish paint, which is a much less forgiving task than a car body which will be under primer, Zero base coat, and then a good layer of Zero 2-pack clear) then I apply "runny" plastic cement (ie not tube glue, and not thin liquid like MekPak) such as Revell Contacta or Humbrol Liquid Poly to both sides of the joint, let it sit for a minute, and squeeze it together hard. You get a "bead" of melted plastic squishing out. Leave it to dry until tomorrow, and then you can take it off with a sharp knife, sand the seam with a four-way nail care "buffer", and it's completely invisible -- the whole surface is just styrene.

bestest,

M.

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3M makes several 2-part polyester finishing-glaze products similar to the Bondo product I suggested. The problem is that the size of the containers from 3M will give you more filler that you'll likely be able to use before it goes bad...unless you do a LOT of model building.

Your local full-scale car body-shop supply should be able to recommend something to you, maybe in a smaller package.

3M also makes a 1-part glazing putty, but all it is is thick lacquer primer, basically the same as the model-specific putties, and it will have the same problems they do.

I only mentioned 3M due to them being the parent company of Bondo. They bought them out from RPM (the same folks that own Testors) a few years ago.

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I only mentioned 3M due to them being the parent company of Bondo. They bought them out from RPM (the same folks that own Testors) a few years ago.

And I was only trying to be helpful, as I have absolutely no idea what's available in Norway, but the OP said they did have 3M. Not all 3M owned products are in all markets, and to the best of my knowledge, the Bondo "Professional" glazing putty is about the only product on the market (here) that comes in modeler-friendly packaging sizes. It's also about the finest-grained stuff I've seen so far, and it works exceptionally well even over primer...which I tend to cringe from using most polyester 2-part products (on 1:1 cars).

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I'm not really sure what's available over there either. I tried looking, but their site wouldn't let me search Norway in English, and unfortunately, I don't read/speak Norwegian. I was more thinking perhaps they might have the same product as the Bondo "Professional" over there under a different brand name. Seems that the Bondo site only shows North American markets that it's available in.

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There's also the original "model car body putty" from the now ancient times of the late 1950's! Back then, we early model car builders, in order to have a putty that worked on plastic (stuck to styrene), was sandable and paintable in the bargain, made our own:

Tube glue, such as Testors (or whatever tube styrene cement is available where one lives), with ordinary talcum powder mixed into it (baby powder makes a really sweet-smelling putty job!) to a paste-like consistency, can be spread on styrene, and once dry, can be sanded and finished very much like any commercially available putties.

Art

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I use what everybody tells me is junk. Testors Contour Putty in the gray tube. The stuff is dirt cheap, and works great if it's not too old. I've had no major problems with it. I've not noticed any shrinking. It dries fast enough you me. Sands well. And years later, the models I've used it on still look good. One of the few Testors products I've got no complaints about.

Scott

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Several people have said they've had acceptable results with the one-part putties. Any pictures?

I still use one-part (AKA lacquer-based putty for small fills, where I have to be careful to not compromise any nearby surface details. On the '38 Opel Admiral I'm building (progress pics go up this weekend), I used little dabs of the stuff to correct things such as ejection-pin marks, a small sink mark here and there, a couple of file "dings". One thing I have taken to doing when using one-part (or air dried) putty is to cure it out in my food dehydrator--in an hour or two, those little spots of putty are as dry and hard as they would be if they were let dry in the open air for at least a couple of weeks.

Art

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Yes, I still use it for very minor fills, but I do a lot of heavy mods and bodywork, and the air-dry stuff just won't get it. That's why I'm asking for pix of "years" old models that have no visible shrinkage.

I've bought heavily-customized gluebombs where the old filler has shrunk and warped and cracked and made an awful mess, and even on some of my 2-year old builds, I can see primer shrinking into sand-scratches under the right light.

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Several people have said they've had acceptable results with the one-part putties. Any pictures?

If you go into "All of the Rest" section and look for 50's Space Travel, the first model you'll see used the Testors putty. A month or two I also posted pictures of an AMT '55 Nomad kit where I built it as the "ElCamino" version. I used the same putty on the roof of that kit.

Scott

Edited by unclescott58
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Tommy, go here: http://www.squadron.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=putty&Submit= Get yourself a tube of the Squadron white. I've used it for almost fifteen years without a single problem. It dries quickly (30 minutes) on typical flaws and sands easily. I won't use anything else.

Most of other members of our local model car club (the MCCM) use Squadron putty too. And seem very happy with the stuff.

Scott

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Norway is not a 3rd world nation. Tommy, I'm sure if you went into a good auto body paint and supply store you could find a suitable two-part polyester filler that would work well and be of equal quality to anything here in the States. In European nations there is U-pol,

Spieshecker (sp) and BASF to name a few. And Tamiya makes a great 2-part filler in a small and large tube, I'm just not crazy about the cured color.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for the feedback and suggestions. Yes there is no problem to get supply for the 1:1,i was just curious on good stuff

intended for models. I`ll check out the 2-part filler Michael. Color is no big deal as it will be primed.

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Can the putty's you mentioned here be used for forming such as for "frenched" headlights or are they just for fillers? I'm in need of something I can mold such as some of the older kits used to come with fins for the rear fenders.

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