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Raw material-Metals

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Trying to build my first engine block. I found a source, that has in "Raw material-Metals," in sizes as small as 1/8" and 1ft long. Styles are endless.

They must have four different aluminums.

When you go the site, go to raw materials. Hope this is helpful....

www.mcmaster.com

Ron Berke

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I've always found the prices for raw materials at McMaster-Carr to be outrageous. Most major cities will have a few metal stores that are willing to cut pieces to the small sizes that we work with regularly.

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Look up your local industrial Technology programs at the local high school and community college. Their machine tech programs should have aluminum scrap. They would appreciate a small donation in exchange.

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Look up your local industrial Technology programs at the local high school and community college. Their machine tech programs should have aluminum scrap. They would appreciate a small donation in exchange.

Being in a HS tech prog, I can tell you donations would be excellent B)

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Mcmaster Carr worked for me. I thought it would be helpful.

Ron

It's good that they work for you; no one said they weren't a good supplier. OnlineMetals.com is also a good supplier and are about 40% less expensive. There are even cheaper ways of getting your metal. There are large machine shops that actually sell their scrap on ebay and, yes, it's cheap.

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one thing: NEVER refer to the leftover bits and pieces they sell you as "scrap". in the trade, it is called "cutoffs", and knowing that, may make the difference between buying it for full value or possibly being given a few pieces too small to bill out cost-effectively. some shops call it "drop-off".

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one thing: NEVER refer to the leftover bits and pieces they sell you as "scrap". in the trade, it is called "cutoffs", and knowing that, may make the difference between buying it for full value or possibly being given a few pieces too small to bill out cost-effectively. some shops call it "drop-off".

It's scrap. If people want to get offended by that word, that's their problem. Scrap doesn't necessarily mean garbage, or something you throw away. if you want to call it something else, fine, but being bothered by someone using a universally known term is just silly.

We fabricate granite and stone tops. We use the cutouts from sinks and tubs, and we use the leftover bits for other projects. It's scrap. It's an undesirable term, people think we have "scrap" laying around that we are going to throw away, or that it has somehow lost it's value because it's smaller than it used to be. Remnants, scrap, extra (that one's hilarious), or whatever it may be.

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I did go to a small tool shop in the Buffalo, NY area. He recommened McMaster-Carr. Special Shapes could not help, and On-Line Metals was not one that was suggested to me. Although I purchased from them in the past. I found the on-line catalog of McMaster Carr much more user-friendly.

I know there are different grades of aluminum, from my late-Dad's days at Bell Aerospace as a Rocket Engineer. I wanted the softest possible. Which is 2011. I thought the easiest way to get this was to purchase this, rather than, run around looking for scrap cutoff or going to tech. schools, and not know what the metal was.

Ron

"Very Easy-to-Machine 2011 Aluminum

Alloy 2011 has the best machinability of all aluminum alloys. It is the most widely selected aluminum for screws, tube fittings, hose parts, and other items that require extensive machining. It is nonmagnetic and heat treatable. Maximum temperature is 212° F; minimum temperature is not rated".

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Well it may not be the easiest but probably quicker than waiting for shipping!

Maybe sometime I should make an engine block.

Maybe sometime I should learn to finish builds, but that's beside the point :D

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When you go the site, go to raw materials. Hope this is helpful....

Every link to a supplier is helpful... if for no other reason than another place to compare with other suppliers. B)

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My model cars are not judged buy the time it takes me to complete them, but my first intention was only to assist fellow

builders with this link.

Ron

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"Very Easy-to-Machine 2011 Aluminum

Alloy 2011 has the best machinability of all aluminum alloys. It is the most widely selected aluminum for screws, tube fittings, hose parts, and other items that require extensive machining. It is nonmagnetic and heat treatable. Maximum temperature is 212° F; minimum temperature is not rated".

While 2011 is easy to machine, it's not very resistant to corrosion, so be careful with what chemicals (coolant while cutting, paint, cleaners and primers later) Nothing is worse than making a beautiful scale part, only to have a tiny bit of corrosion ruin everything!

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Ron that is a good link you posted. They carry a great deal of stuff for our hobby. This is one place that a pattern shop would buy from back in the day. They may not be the cheapest but that is for the buyer to decide. They always carried quality products before. That says more to me than a cheap product that does not last. Thanks for posting the link.

Edited by 1930fordpickup

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Thanks for your comments Joe and Andy. The only motor tools I use are my Dremel and a Grinder. The rest is virtually by hand with my late dads vintage file set. Here is a pik. of my garage workspace.

post-7058-0-95005800-1412820941_thumb.jp

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looks good. folks sometimes underestimate the value of a heavy vise until they get the habit to use one. nice mount so long stuff can go to the floor (I've seen them mounted square in the middle of the bench, which may be good for single purpose, but not too versatile).

hope there's a file card & block of chalk stashed in that drawer if you're doing a lot of aluminum work.

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